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45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5-7 October 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283198
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2017 Feb;39(1):208-341
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2017

[900 tons of drugs are returned to pharmacies annually. A questionnaire study on unused drugs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180861
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Mar 4;101(10):898-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2004
Author
Kerstin Hulter Asberg
Author Affiliation
Medicinskt centrum, Lasarettet i Enköping. kerstin.hulter.asberg@lul.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Mar 4;101(10):898-900
Date
Mar-4-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - economics
Pharmacies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Refusal
PubMed ID
15055052 View in PubMed
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The 1982 Hoechst Lecture: "Cost effectiveness--the emerging 'bottom line' for pharmacy?!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243460
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1982 Mar-Apr;35(2):39-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
J A Marshman
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1982 Mar-Apr;35(2):39-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Efficiency
Humans
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - economics
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - economics
Abstract
In the current climate of budgetary restraint in the health care system, cost effectiveness is a concept which surfaces with increasing frequency, especially in reference to health care services funded by government. Since significant elements of pharmacy services in Canada are thus funded (including in most provinces, hospital pharmacy services, and prescription drug plans for senior citizens), it is important that pharmacy "tune into" the concept, and recognize it as an essential criterion to be met in the maintenance of existing services and in the development of new services. Prerequisite to a consideration of cost effectiveness is, of course, consideration of effectiveness; and a statement about the effectiveness; and a statement about the effectiveness of a service implies a potential for measurement of effect or outcome. In the 1980s, as pharmacy focuses its efforts on patients rather than products, that effect must surely be defined in "people" terms. One of the important dimensions of today's patient-focussed pharmacy services is patient counselling, more broadly, patient education.
PubMed ID
10309676 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
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The access to contraception and sterilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36230
Source
Entre Nous Cph Den. 1993 Jun;(22-23):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
C. Blayo
A E Leitao
Source
Entre Nous Cph Den. 1993 Jun;(22-23):4
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Contraception
Delivery of Health Care
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Services
Health planning
Health Services Accessibility
Organization and Administration
Pharmacies
Sterilization, Reproductive
Abstract
The various countries of Europe have similar conditions of access to contraceptive methods. In eastern Europe, however, the supply of contraceptive pills, coils, spermicidal products, and condoms is less than the demand (except for Hungary and the Czech and Slovak republics), particularly in Poland, in the former Soviet Union, and in Romania. Sweden and Turkey have authorized midwives to prescribe contraceptive pills or to insert coils. In Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, and in the former Soviet Union, the dispensing of pills without prescription is tolerated. Spermicidal products can generally be dispensed in pharmacies without a prescription. Condoms are sold even in Ireland. France dose not allow the advertising of contraceptives in nonmedical journals, while Denmark encourages such advertising. Today a number of European countries regulate contraceptive surgery. In Finland, a minimum of 3 children is the prerequisite and age conditions are set (over 18 years in Turkey, over 25 years in Austria, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, and Sweden, over 30 years in Finland, and over 35 years in Croatia and Slovenia). Sterilization for contraceptive purposes constitutes a statutory offense of mutilation in France, Ireland, Austria, Greece, Malta, and Poland. Sterilization is carried out in Spain and Italy, less so in Ireland and Malta, and there is slow progress in this regard in Belgium and France. Voluntary sterilization is legally allowed in Hungary and Romania, practiced on a small scale in Albania, and prohibited in Bulgaria. The Netherlands has the highest number of couples protected by sterilization. Most often the public family planning services are integrated in other services, such as community clinics, hospitals, and pre- and postnatal clinics. In Europe as compared with the developing countries, a very large number of private practitioners have the responsibility of informing and prescribing.
PubMed ID
12222243 View in PubMed
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Access to new cardiovascular therapies in Canadian hospitals: a national survey of the formulary process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186545
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Feb;19(2):173-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Stephen J Shalansky
Roohina Virk
Margaret Ackman
Cynthia Jackevicius
Heather Kertland
Ross Tsuyuki
Karin Humphries
Author Affiliation
Pharmacy Department, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. shalansk@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Feb;19(2):173-9
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiovascular Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Dalteparin - economics - therapeutic use
Data Collection
Drug Utilization
Enoxaparin - economics - therapeutic use
Formularies, Hospital - standards
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hematologic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments - economics - therapeutic use
Peptides - economics - therapeutic use
Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee - economics - organization & administration - standards
Ticlopidine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Access to new therapies in hospitals depends upon both clinical trial evidence and local Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) committee approval. The process of formulary evaluation by P&T committees is not well-understood.
To describe the formulary decision-making process in Canadian hospitals for cardiovascular medications recently made available on the Canadian market.
Postal survey of hospital pharmacy directors in all Canadian hospitals with more than 50 beds. Target drugs included abciximab, enoxaparin, dalteparin, clopidogrel, eptifibatide and tirofiban.
Of 428 surveys mailed, responses were received from 164 P&T committees representing 350 hospitals for an effective response rate of 82%. While physicians make up the largest proportion of committee membership, pharmacists play an influential role. Information most commonly cited as influencing formulary decisions included published clinical trials (97%), regional guidelines (90%), pharmacoeconomic data (84%), decisions at peer hospitals (73%) and local opinion leaders (60%). However, this information was often not required on formulary applications. Approval timelines varied widely for target medications but there were no regional, hospital or P&T committee characteristics that were independent predictors of early formulary application or approval.
There is wide variability in the time taken for Canadian institutions to adopt new cardiovascular therapies, which is not explained by regional, hospital or P&T committee characteristics. Standardization of the formulary application and evaluation processes, including sharing of information amongst institutions, would lead to broader understanding of the applicable issues, more objectivity and improved efficiency.
PubMed ID
12601443 View in PubMed
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Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115926
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:183
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ekaterina V Fedorova
Roman V Skochilov
Robert Heimer
Patricia Case
Leo Beletsky
Lauretta E Grau
Andrey P Kozlov
Alla V Shaboltas
Author Affiliation
The Biomedical Center, 8, Viborgskaya Street, St. Petersburg 194044, Russia. ekaterina_fedorova@yahoo.com
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:183
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Commerce - methods
Female
HIV Infections - etiology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Pharmacies - classification - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Syringes - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city's estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg.
965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts--one central and one peripheral--that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts.
No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten.
Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists' willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes in the federal list of mandatory medical products sold by pharmacies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23452390 View in PubMed
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Access to syringes in three Russian cities: implications for syringe distribution and coverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158518
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anya Sarang
Tim Rhodes
Lucy Platt
Author Affiliation
Russian Harm Reduction Network, Ilimskaya Street, 4-1-38, 127576 Moscow, Russia. anyasarang@gmail.com
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Data Collection
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needle-Exchange Programs - economics - utilization
Pharmacies - organization & administration
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Risk-Taking
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Syringes - supply & distribution
Urban Health Services - supply & distribution
Abstract
We report findings from a multi-method study investigating drug injectors' access to needles and syringes in three large Russian cities (Moscow, Volgograd, Barnaul).
We undertook 209 qualitative interviews among drug injectors, and supplemented these with baseline data from a community-recruited survey of 1473 drug injectors.
Almost all (93%; 1277) injectors used pharmacies as their main source of clean injecting equipment, and only 7% (105) reported ever having had contact with city syringe exchange projects. Good access to syringes has coincided with the expansion of private pharmacies. Key factors contributing to pharmacy access included: geographic proximity; low cost; and the restrictive policies of exchange instituted at local syringe exchanges. A fear of police interference surrounded the use of pharmacies and syringe exchanges, and fed a reluctance to carry used needles and syringes, which in turn acted as a disincentive to syringe exchange attendance. The perceived benefits of syringe exchanges over pharmacies included the additional health services on offer and the social support provided, but these benefits were over-shadowed by disadvantages. Multivariable analyses of survey data in two cities show no differences on account of risk behaviour among injectors sourcing equipment from pharmacies compared to syringe exchanges.
HIV prevention coverage indicators need to include measures of pharmacy-based syringe distribution and not only measures of syringe exchange coverage. There is an urgent need to pilot pharmacy-based distribution and exchange projects in Russia as well as other forms of secondary syringe distribution. Alongside expanding the reach of dedicated syringe exchange projects, pharmacy-based syringe distribution, and exchange, may help improve coverage of cost effective HIV prevention measures targeting drug injectors.
PubMed ID
18313910 View in PubMed
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Access to the morning-after pill in BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198164
Source
CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-2000
Author
B. Osmond
Source
CMAJ. 2000 May 30;162(11):1554
Date
May-30-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Contraceptives, Postcoital
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Legislation, Pharmacy
Pharmacists
Notes
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Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):876-710750481
PubMed ID
10862224 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the municipal hospital pharmacy in Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111733
Source
Sven Farm Tidskr. 1966 Aug 20;70(23):558-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1966
Source
Sven Farm Tidskr. 1966 Aug 20;70(23):558-9
Date
Aug-20-1966
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Sweden
PubMed ID
5964651 View in PubMed
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786 records – page 1 of 79.