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[Academician Nikolai Pavlovich Kravkov: on his 150th birthday].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264379
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2015;78(3):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
D G Uzbekova
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2015;78(3):3-8
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Military Medicine - education - history - organization & administration
Pharmacology - education - history - organization & administration
Portraits as Topic
Russia
Abstract
The article outlines the life and activities of academician N. P. Kravkov (1865-1924), the founder of pharmacology in Russia. During his 25 years of service as Head of the Department of Pharmacology at the Military Medical Academy in St. Petersburg, N. P. Kravkov established a large national school of pharmacological science. He was the author of a number of fundamental discoveries, which enriched the Russian and world science.
PubMed ID
26036003 View in PubMed
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Assessment of objectives of post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195753
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Epstein
A. Tejani
P. Glassman
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada.
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Dental
Canada
Clinical Competence
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Education, Dental, Graduate - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Endodontics - education
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Oral Medicine - education
Organizational Objectives
Orthodontics - education
Pathology, Oral - education
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Periodontics - education
Pharmacology - education
Practice Management, Dental
Preventive Dentistry - education
Primary Health Care
Prosthodontics - education
Public Health Dentistry - education
Questionnaires
Surgery, Oral - education
United States
Abstract
Objectives of hospital-based post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada were assessed by questionnaire. Seventy percent (14 of 20) of the program directors responded. Educational goals and objectives were assessed in professional skills and practice management, public health and preventive dentistry, oral medicine and pathology, special needs patient care, trauma and emergency care, restorative/prosthodontic care, endodontics, orthodontics/pediatric dentistry, oral surgery, periodontics, pharmacology, and functioning in a hospital. High rankings of proficiency were related to primary care, restorative/prosthodontic, endodontic, and surgical care. Emergency care, sedation, and pharmacology were also ranked highly. Lower rankings of proficiency were reported in orthodontics, aspects of public health dentistry, practice management, and advanced oral and maxiliofacial surgery. When the results of the Canadian survey were compared with those of a survey of US post-doctoral general dentistry programs, substantial similarity was seen. The findings support continuing reciprocity in accreditation standards between the Canadian and American Commissions on Dental Education and Dental Accreditation.
PubMed ID
11203897 View in PubMed
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Commentary on Grandell-Niemi H, Hupli M, Leino-Kilpi H & Puuka P (2005). Finnish nurses and nursing students' pharmacological skills. Journal of Clinical Nursing14, 685-694.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163425
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Jun;16(6):1188-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Gerry Armitage
Author Affiliation
Nursing Division, School of Health Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK and Award Holder, National Researcher Development Award, Department of Health, UK. g.armitage@bradford.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Jun;16(6):1188-91
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Finland
Humans
Nursing Education Research - standards
Nursing Staff - education
Pharmacology - education
Research Design - standards
Students, Nursing
Notes
Comment On: J Clin Nurs. 2005 Jul;14(6):685-9415946276
PubMed ID
17518895 View in PubMed
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Feedback on prescribing rate combined with problem-oriented pharmacotherapy education as a model to improve prescribing behaviour among general practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46114
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jan-Feb;56(11):843-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Nilsson
P. Hjemdahl
A. Hässler
S. Vitols
N H Wallén
I. Krakau
Author Affiliation
Department of Information Technology and Informatics, Health Care Provision Region, Stockholm County North, Sollentuna, Sweden. gunnar.nilsson@nvso.sil.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jan-Feb;56(11):843-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Family Practice
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Pharmacoepidemiology
Pharmacology - education
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pilot Projects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To develop a working model with which prescribing behaviour among general practitioners might be influenced. DESIGN: Intervention based on feedback on prescribing rates and problem-oriented educational outreach visits, using educational material and local opinion leaders. Randomised study with three parallel intervention groups of general practitioners, which also served as controls for each other. The pharmacotherapeutic fields chosen were hypertension, peptic ulcer/dyspepsia and depression. Prescription data were retrieved from the electronic patient records for periods of 1 year before and after the intervention. SETTING: Six health care centres and three continuing medical education groups in Stockholm. SUBJECTS: Forty general practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Drug prescribing rates and patterns before and after the intervention. RESULTS: In the hypertension field, desired trends in fractional prescribing (favouring diuretics and beta blocking agents) were recorded, with a significant (P
PubMed ID
11294376 View in PubMed
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Finnish nurses' and nursing students' mathematical skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172476
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2006 Feb;26(2):151-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Heidi Grandell-Niemi
Maija Hupli
Pauli Puukka
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Finland. heidi.grandell-niemi@postikaista.net
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2006 Feb;26(2):151-61
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Drug Therapy - nursing
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - standards
Educational Measurement - methods - standards
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Medication Errors - nursing
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Pharmacology - education
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
The health care environment requires that practitioners have sufficient mathematical skills to perform accurate, safe and effective medication administration. This is a highly responsible and nursing task, which is performed daily. In this study 364 nurses and 282 graduating nursing students in Finland completed the Medication Calculation Skills Test (MCS Test). According to the findings students lacked accurate mathematical skills, while nurses attained higher scores in the test. Nurses with an upper secondary school education managed better with the calculation problems than nurses with a lower basic education. Students who had an excellent mark (9-10) in mathematics, had studied mathematics longer at high school and were more satisfied with the amount of medication calculation instructions and scored higher in the MCS Test than others. The differences between the nurses' and students' mathematical skills were significant. The MCS Test could be used to measure one's own skills and to give information of the mathematical skill level for constructing a nursing curriculum or additional training for clinical practice.
PubMed ID
16216391 View in PubMed
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Finnish nurses' and nursing students' pharmacological skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174364
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Jul;14(6):685-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Heidi Grandell-Niemi
Maija Hupli
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Pauli Puukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. heidi.grandell-niemi@postikaista.net
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Jul;14(6):685-94
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Drug Therapy - nursing
Education, Nursing - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Pharmacology - education
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES: The purposes of this study were to investigate the pharmacological skills of Finnish nurses and graduating nursing students, to determine how pharmacological skills are related to background factors and to identify differences between nurses and students and, finally, to examine how the instrument used, the Medication Calculation Skills Test, works.
Pharmacology is a relevant and topical subject. In several studies, however, pharmacological skills of nurses and nursing students have been found insufficient. In addition, pharmacology as a subject is found to be difficult for both nursing students and nurses.
The study was evaluative in nature; the data were collected using the Medication Calculation Skills Test, developed for the purposes of this study. The instrument was used to gather information on background factors and self-rated pharmacological and mathematical skills and to test actual skills in these areas.
Results concerning pharmacological skills are reported in this paper. The maximum Medication Calculation Skills Test score was 24 points. The mean score for nurses was 18.6 and that for students 16.3. Half of (50%) the students attained a score of 67% and 57% of nurses attained a score of 79%.
Nurses and students had some deficiencies in their pharmacological skills. Nurses had better pharmacological skills than students according to both self-ratings and actual performance on the test.
It is vitally important that nurses have adequate pharmacological skills to administer medicines correctly. This study showed that the Medication Calculation Skills Test seems to work well in measuring pharmacological skills, even though it needs further evaluation. Findings from this study can be used when planning the nursing curriculum and further education for Registered Nurses.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2007 Jun;16(6):1188-9117518895
PubMed ID
15946276 View in PubMed
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The first historical movements of kinesiology: scientification in the borderline between physical culture and medicine around 1850.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100508
Source
Int J Hist Sport. 2010;27(11):1892-1919
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anders Ottosson
Author Affiliation
Department of History, Gothenburg University.
Source
Int J Hist Sport. 2010;27(11):1892-1919
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Gymnastics - education - history - physiology - psychology
History of Medicine
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Kinesiology, Applied - education - history
Pharmacology - education - history
Physical Education and Training - history
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Physical Therapy (Specialty) - education - history
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The kinesiology concept is used worldwide and by many different professional groups with scientific aspirations. Yet nobody seems to know much about where it comes from and why it came into existence. This article traces the origins of the concept back to one of Sweden's greatest cultural exports of the nineteenth century - Swedish gymnastics - and the efforts of especially Swedish physiotherapists and physical educators to spread its scientific doctrines throughout the world. Primarily their goal was to convert the representatives of conventional medicine (pharmacology) into a more mechanical mode of understanding and curing illness (physiotherapy). While following in the footsteps of one physiotherapist/physical educator -'the father of kinesiology'- and examining the ideological and historical conditions his so-called 'mission' was ruled by, the social construction of knowledge and science is made visible in a way seldom highlighted in the history of medicine and physical education.
PubMed ID
20653114 View in PubMed
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Impact of problem-based learning in a large classroom setting: student perception and problem-solving skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129129
Source
Adv Physiol Educ. 2011 Dec;35(4):408-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Andis Klegeris
Heather Hurren
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, Canada. andis.klegeris@ubc.ca
Source
Adv Physiol Educ. 2011 Dec;35(4):408-15
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biochemistry - education
British Columbia
Comprehension
Educational Measurement
Group Processes
Humans
Motivation
Perception
Pharmacology - education
Problem Solving
Problem-Based Learning
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Retention (Psychology)
Students
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Problem-based learning (PBL) can be described as a learning environment where the problem drives the learning. This technique usually involves learning in small groups, which are supervised by tutors. It is becoming evident that PBL in a small-group setting has a robust positive effect on student learning and skills, including better problem-solving skills and an increase in overall motivation. However, very little research has been done on the educational benefits of PBL in a large classroom setting. Here, we describe a PBL approach (using tutorless groups) that was introduced as a supplement to standard didactic lectures in University of British Columbia Okanagan undergraduate biochemistry classes consisting of 45-85 students. PBL was chosen as an effective method to assist students in learning biochemical and physiological processes. By monitoring student attendance and using informal and formal surveys, we demonstrated that PBL has a significant positive impact on student motivation to attend and participate in the course work. Student responses indicated that PBL is superior to traditional lecture format with regard to the understanding of course content and retention of information. We also demonstrated that student problem-solving skills are significantly improved, but additional controlled studies are needed to determine how much PBL exercises contribute to this improvement. These preliminary data indicated several positive outcomes of using PBL in a large classroom setting, although further studies aimed at assessing student learning are needed to further justify implementation of this technique in courses delivered to large undergraduate classes.
PubMed ID
22139779 View in PubMed
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[Incidence and prevention of lethal undesirable drug effects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182711
Source
Internist (Berl). 2003 Jul;44(7):889-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
J U Schnurrer
J C Frölich
Author Affiliation
Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover.
Source
Internist (Berl). 2003 Jul;44(7):889-95
Date
Jul-2003
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems
Drug Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Medication Errors - classification - mortality - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmacology - education
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Abstract
About every second decision of a medical doctor concerns drug therapy. On the basis of a representative Norwegian study, which analyzed fatal drug reactions in stationary patients of internal medicine wards by autopsy and plasma drug concentrations, in Germany 58,000 fatalities are occurring in this patient population. The treating physicians classified only 6% of drug induced fatalities as such. Therefore, the risk of drug therapy is grossly underestimated. In half of the cases medication errors were causative and therefore these could potentially all be avoided. In addition to improved pre- and postgraduate education in clinical pharmacology the use of computer-based expert systems would be a decisive step to optimize drug therapy.
PubMed ID
14631585 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.