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Acid-suppressing drugs and gastroesophageal reflux disease as risk factors for acute pancreatitis--results from a Swedish Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172609
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Anders Sundström
Kerstin Blomgren
Lars Alfredsson
Bengt-Erik Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden. Anders.Sundstrom@Mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antacids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - drug therapy
Histamine H2 Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study risk factors for acute pancreatitis, here with emphasis on gastro-intestinal diseases and their treatments.
Population based case-control study covering four areas in Sweden encompassing 2.2 million inhabitants. Included were 462 incident cases of acute pancreatitis aged 20-85 years, hospitalized from 1 January 1995-31 May 1998, and 1,781 unmatched controls randomly selected from the study base using a population register. Information was captured from medical records and structured telephone interviews.
Current use of H(2) antagonists starting within 6 months of index-date was associated with acute pancreatitis with an adjusted OR of 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15), and current use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95%CI 1.4-7.4). For both drug classes, the ORs tended to be higher at higher doses. Gastritis/gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) within the last 12 months not treated with PPIs or H(2)-antagonists and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) not treated with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs were associated with development of acute pancreatitis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.9 (95%CI 1.2-3.0) and 5.1 (95%CI 2.0-13) respectively.
Current IBD without treatment and gastritis/GERD without treatment were found to be associated with increased risks to develop acute pancreatitis but the nature of the latter association needs to be further evaluated. On balance, we judge that the observed associations between current use of H(2)-antagonists and PPIs and increased risk of acute pancreatitis are unlikely to be explained by bias.
PubMed ID
16200654 View in PubMed
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Administrative claims data analysis of nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149161
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Andrea L Murphy
Ruth Martin-Misener
Charmaine Cooke
Ingrid Sketris
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. andrea.murphy@dal.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - economics - nursing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study to identify the patterns of prescribing by primary health care nurse practitioners for a cohort of older adults.
The older adult population is known to receive complex pharmacotherapy. Monitoring prescribing to older adults can inform quality improvement initiatives. In comparison to other countries, research examining nurse practitioner prescribing in Canada is limited. Nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults is relatively unexplored in the international literature. Although commonly used to study physician prescribing, few studies have used claims data from drug insurance programmes to investigate nurse practitioner prescribing.
Drug claims for prescriptions written by nurse practitioners from fiscal years 2004/05 to 2006/07 for beneficiaries of the Nova Scotia Seniors' Pharmacare programme were analysed. Data were retrieved and analysed in May 2008. Prescribing was described for each drug using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code classification system by usage and costs for each fiscal year.
Antimicrobials and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs consistently represented the top ranked groups for prescription volume and cost. Over the three fiscal years, antimicrobial prescription rates declined relative to rates of other groups of medications. Prescription volume per nurse doubled and cost per prescription increased by approximately 20%.
Prescription claims data can be used to characterize the prescribing trends of nurse practitioners. Research linking patient characteristics, including diagnoses, to prescriptions is needed to assess prescribing quality. Some potential areas of improvement were identified with antimicrobial and non-steroidal antiinflammatory selection.
PubMed ID
19674174 View in PubMed
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Adult height in women with childhood asthma--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15463
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Mar-Apr;10(2):121-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Norjavaara
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
B. Lindmark
Author Affiliation
AstraZeneca R&D Lund, Sweden. maria.gerhardsson@astrazeneca.com
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Mar-Apr;10(2):121-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - epidemiology
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pharmacoepidemiology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study adult height in children that grew up with asthma before inhaled steroids became first-line therapy. METHODS: Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register (self-reported asthma) and the Hospital Discharge Register (first hospitalization for asthma) were used, to compare adult height for asthmatic and non-asthmatic pregnant women. The analysis was restricted to women in their first full-term pregnancy, born in Sweden between 1960-1974 and of Swedish citizenship. RESULTS: The mean height of all the women in the study population was 166.7 cm (SD = 8.8, n = 287,750) and of the women who reported asthma 166.5 cm (SD = 6.1, n = 13,059, p
PubMed ID
11499850 View in PubMed
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Aggregated and individual pharmacy record data. Association between antibiotic and antihypertensive drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154756
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jan;65(1):107-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009

Alopecia associated with treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81812
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Oct;15(10):719-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Hedenmalm Karin
Sundström Anders
Spigset Olav
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. karin.hedenmalm@mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Oct;15(10):719-25
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alopecia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bayes Theorem
Citalopram - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Sertraline - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the association between alopecia and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) by estimating reporting rates and by making association comparisons within databases of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). METHODS: All reports of alopecia with marketed SSRIs until the end of 2004 were identified in SWEDIS, the national Swedish database for spontaneously reported ADRs, and in Vigibase, the international ADR database of the World Health Organization. Total SSRI sales volumes in Sweden until the end of 2004 were obtained from the National Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies. The Bayes' Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) method was used to estimate associations between alopecia and each of the SSRIs within the two databases. RESULTS: A total of 27 reports of alopecia were identified in SWEDIS. As two reports concerned the use of two SSRIs, there was a total of 29 drug-ADR combinations. All except three reports concerned women (88.9%). The reporting rate of alopecia in Sweden was significantly higher with sertraline compared with citalopram; 20.1 (95%CI 10.7-34.4) reports per million patient-years versus 4.5 (95%CI 1.8-9.3) reports per million patient-years. No significant differences in reporting rates were noted for the remaining SSRIs. Sertraline also showed a statistically significant association with alopecia in both SWEDIS and Vigibase. Citalopram was significantly associated with alopecia in Vigibase, but not in SWEDIS. No statistically significant associations were found for any of the other SSRIs. CONCLUSIONS: Alopecia appears to be a rare ADR to SSRIs. The risk of alopecia seems to vary between the different SSRIs, and might be higher in women than in men.
PubMed ID
16783834 View in PubMed
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Another piece of the inhaled corticosteroids-in-COPD puzzle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193526
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Aug 15;164(4):514-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2001

[Antibiotic treatment of acute otitis in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33159
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Aug 10;119(18):2649-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1999
Author
T. Myrbakk
A. Giaever
O. Olsvik
T. Flaegstad
Author Affiliation
Det medisinske fakultet, Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Aug 10;119(18):2649-52
Date
Aug-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug
Abstract
Treatment of acute otitis is one of the most common reasons for prescribing antibiotics for children. Recent studies have shown no, or only a small, effect of antibiotic treatment of this condition. We examined the files from the City of Tromsø's Emergency Department, which catchment area includes about 12,300 children under the age of 15. During the period from March 1997 to May 1998, 784 children presented with acute otitis, 91.5% of whom received antibiotic treatment. The most frequently drug used drug was penicillin V. Even if there are no or only a small effect of antibiotic treatment of this condition, most children receive such treatment. This study will give baseline data for new studies aimed at reducing the use of antibiotics.
PubMed ID
10479977 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic use profile at paediatric clinics in two transitional countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180663
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2004 Mar;13(3):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Goran Palcevski
Vladimir Ahel
Vera Vlahovic-Palcevski
Svetlana Ratchina
Vesna Rosovic-Bazijanac
L. Averchenkova
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital Centre Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia. goran.palcevski@ri.tel.hr
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2004 Mar;13(3):181-5
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amoxicillin - therapeutic use
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Azithromycin - therapeutic use
Ceftriaxone - therapeutic use
Cefuroxime - therapeutic use
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Croatia
Data Collection
Developing Countries
Doxycycline - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization Review - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Gentamicins - therapeutic use
Hospital records
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Leucomycins - therapeutic use
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Abstract
In this study, we evaluated antibiotic utilisation pattern at two paediatric clinics in different European (transitional) countries: Croatia (Rijeka) and Russia (Smolensk).
Antibiotic utilisation during the year 2000 was observed using the ATC/defined daily doses (DDD) methodology (ATC code-J01). Drug-usage data was expressed in numbers of DDD/100 bed-days and the DU90% profile.
In Rijeka, 35 different systemic antibiotics were used and in Smolensk 22. The overall consumption of antibiotic drugs in Rijeka was more than three times higher than in Smolensk (28.96 vs 8.3 DDD/100 bed-days). The top five antibiotic drugs used in Smolensk were amoxicillin, mydecamicin, ampicilin, doxycylin, gentamicin; and in Rijeka cefuroxime axetil, ceftriaxone, azytromycin, ceftibuten and amoxicillin.
Differences in antibiotic prescribing patterns are greater than expected. The pattern of antibiotic utilisation in both countries implies that regional control measures and guidelines for antibiotic use in children should be urgently established.
PubMed ID
15072118 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medications and risk for cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20211
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S O Dalton
C. Johansen
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
J K McLaughlin
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):171-6
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Antidepressants appear to promote tumor growth in experimental studies; however, results from epidemiologic studies are inconclusive. We used a population-based cohort study to estimate the incidence of cancer after antidepressant treatment in 39,807 adult users of antidepressants identified in the Prescription Database of the County of North Jutland, Denmark between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1995. Information on cancer occurrence was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. We categorized exposure according to use of tricyclic antidepressants, tetracyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. In the follow-up period beginning 1 year after first known prescription, there were 966 cancers among users of antidepressants; our population estimate suggested an expected number of 946 for an overall standardized incidence ratio of 1.0 (95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.1). Users of tricyclic antidepressants had an excess of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, with the risk increasing with the number of prescriptions of tricyclic antidepressants. The standardized incidence ratio was 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.2) for those with five or more prescriptions. Our results provide little evidence that antidepressants promote cancer at other sites, except for a possible effect of tricyclic antidepressants and tetracyclic antidepressants on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
PubMed ID
11021615 View in PubMed
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Antiepileptic drugs and risk of suicide: a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99422
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 May;19(5):518-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Peter Riis Hansen
Jesper Erdal
Steen Zabell Abildstrøm
Peter Weeke
Emil Loldrup Fosbøl
Henrik Enghusen Poulsen
Gunnar H Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. jo@heart.dk
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 May;19(5):518-24
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticonvulsants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with epilepsy or psychiatric diseases have increased risk of suicide, but whether the risk is influenced by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is unclear. Studies have suggested that AEDs in general increase the risk of suicidal behaviour shortly after initiation. This study investigated possible differences in suicide risk associated with different AEDs. METHODS: The use of AEDs in the Danish population from 1997 to 2006 was determined by prescription claims. The risk of suicide associated with use of AEDs was estimated by case-crossover analyses, where each case serves at its own control during different periods. For sensitivity, the risk of suicide was estimated by a time-dependent Cox proportional-hazard analysis in AED treatment-naïve patients. RESULTS: There were 6780 cases committing suicide in the 10-year study period, of which 422 received AED treatment at the time of suicide. The case-crossover analysis estimated AED treatment initiation to increase the risk of suicide (odds ratio (OR): 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36-2.49). Clonazepam (OR: 2.01, CI: 1.25-3.25), valproate (OR: 2.08, CI: 1.04-4.16), lamotrigine (OR: 3.15, CI: 1.35-7.34) and phenobarbital (OR: 1.96, CI: 1.02-3.75) were associated with a significant increased risk, while the remaining examined AEDs did not significantly influence the risk. In the cohort comprising of 169 725 AED treatment-naïve patients, the Cox proportional-hazard analysis yielded similar results. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that clonazepam, valproate, lamotrigine and phenobarbital relatively shortly after treatment initiation may increase the risk of suicide. The increased risk of suicide associated with these AEDs appears to be a consistent finding.
PubMed ID
20235081 View in PubMed
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128 records – page 1 of 13.