Skip header and navigation

Refine By

184 records – page 1 of 19.

25 years of pharmacoepidemiologic innovation: the Saskatchewan health administrative databases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138275
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2011;18(2):e245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

Acid-suppressing drugs and gastroesophageal reflux disease as risk factors for acute pancreatitis--results from a Swedish Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172609
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Anders Sundström
Kerstin Blomgren
Lars Alfredsson
Bengt-Erik Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden. Anders.Sundstrom@Mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antacids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - drug therapy
Histamine H2 Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study risk factors for acute pancreatitis, here with emphasis on gastro-intestinal diseases and their treatments.
Population based case-control study covering four areas in Sweden encompassing 2.2 million inhabitants. Included were 462 incident cases of acute pancreatitis aged 20-85 years, hospitalized from 1 January 1995-31 May 1998, and 1,781 unmatched controls randomly selected from the study base using a population register. Information was captured from medical records and structured telephone interviews.
Current use of H(2) antagonists starting within 6 months of index-date was associated with acute pancreatitis with an adjusted OR of 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15), and current use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95%CI 1.4-7.4). For both drug classes, the ORs tended to be higher at higher doses. Gastritis/gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) within the last 12 months not treated with PPIs or H(2)-antagonists and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) not treated with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs were associated with development of acute pancreatitis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.9 (95%CI 1.2-3.0) and 5.1 (95%CI 2.0-13) respectively.
Current IBD without treatment and gastritis/GERD without treatment were found to be associated with increased risks to develop acute pancreatitis but the nature of the latter association needs to be further evaluated. On balance, we judge that the observed associations between current use of H(2)-antagonists and PPIs and increased risk of acute pancreatitis are unlikely to be explained by bias.
PubMed ID
16200654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence, therapeutic intensity, and the number of dispensed drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131359
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Dec;20(12):1255-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Bo Hovstadius
Göran Petersson
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. bo.hovstadius@pwc.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Dec;20(12):1255-61
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology - methods
Prescription Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate non-adherence in relation to the therapeutic intensity (TI) and the number of dispensed drugs per individual and study whether the TI can be used as an estimator of non-adherence with an increasing number of drugs.
The study comprised an individual-based register of all dispensed outpatient prescriptions in Sweden in 2006, including 6.2 million individuals. The applied definition of drug was the chemical entity or substance comprising the fifth level in the World Health Organisation's Anatomic, Therapeutic, Chemical classification. The defined daily dosage per individual during 12 months was applied as an indicator of the TI.
We found a positive linear relation between the TI and the increasing number of dispensed drugs per individual, both for men and women. We found a slightly diminishing TI with an increasing number of drugs only for the age groups above 70 years, at a level above 13 drugs per individual.
The linear relationship between the TI and the increasing number of dispensed drugs per individual provides poor support for using decreasing TI as an estimator of non-adherence. The low rate of cost-related non-adherence in Sweden might contribute to explaining the linear relationship.
PubMed ID
21913278 View in PubMed
Less detail

Administrative claims data analysis of nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149161
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Andrea L Murphy
Ruth Martin-Misener
Charmaine Cooke
Ingrid Sketris
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. andrea.murphy@dal.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - economics - nursing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study to identify the patterns of prescribing by primary health care nurse practitioners for a cohort of older adults.
The older adult population is known to receive complex pharmacotherapy. Monitoring prescribing to older adults can inform quality improvement initiatives. In comparison to other countries, research examining nurse practitioner prescribing in Canada is limited. Nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults is relatively unexplored in the international literature. Although commonly used to study physician prescribing, few studies have used claims data from drug insurance programmes to investigate nurse practitioner prescribing.
Drug claims for prescriptions written by nurse practitioners from fiscal years 2004/05 to 2006/07 for beneficiaries of the Nova Scotia Seniors' Pharmacare programme were analysed. Data were retrieved and analysed in May 2008. Prescribing was described for each drug using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code classification system by usage and costs for each fiscal year.
Antimicrobials and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs consistently represented the top ranked groups for prescription volume and cost. Over the three fiscal years, antimicrobial prescription rates declined relative to rates of other groups of medications. Prescription volume per nurse doubled and cost per prescription increased by approximately 20%.
Prescription claims data can be used to characterize the prescribing trends of nurse practitioners. Research linking patient characteristics, including diagnoses, to prescriptions is needed to assess prescribing quality. Some potential areas of improvement were identified with antimicrobial and non-steroidal antiinflammatory selection.
PubMed ID
19674174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult height in women with childhood asthma--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15463
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Mar-Apr;10(2):121-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Norjavaara
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
B. Lindmark
Author Affiliation
AstraZeneca R&D Lund, Sweden. maria.gerhardsson@astrazeneca.com
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Mar-Apr;10(2):121-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - epidemiology
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pharmacoepidemiology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study adult height in children that grew up with asthma before inhaled steroids became first-line therapy. METHODS: Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register (self-reported asthma) and the Hospital Discharge Register (first hospitalization for asthma) were used, to compare adult height for asthmatic and non-asthmatic pregnant women. The analysis was restricted to women in their first full-term pregnancy, born in Sweden between 1960-1974 and of Swedish citizenship. RESULTS: The mean height of all the women in the study population was 166.7 cm (SD = 8.8, n = 287,750) and of the women who reported asthma 166.5 cm (SD = 6.1, n = 13,059, p
PubMed ID
11499850 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse drug reactions causing hospitalization can be monitored from computerized medical records and thereby indicate the quality of drug utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83234
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
von Euler Mia
Eliasson Erik
Ohlén Gunnar
Bergman Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Mia.voneuler@karolinska.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):179-84
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Drug Therapy - adverse effects
Drug Toxicity - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - utilization
Humans
Internal Medicine
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology - methods
Pilot Projects
Prescriptions, Drug - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To use computerized medical records to study the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR) as a cause for acute admission to a university hospital. METHODS: Computerized medical records in 168 consecutively acutely admitted cases to a short-term internal medicine ward at a university hospital were retrospectively evaluated to see if an ADR could have caused the admission. RESULTS: In 18 cases (11%), an ADR was judged to be the reason for acute admission to the hospital. Augmented pharmacological effects (type A reactions) accounted for 89% of the cases. An additional eight cases (5%) were intentional intoxications with prescription drugs. ADR-associated hospital admissions were age-related (average age 72 compared to 65 in patients admitted for other reasons) and also associated with poly-pharmacy (8.3 drugs compared to 5.2). The ADR was considered to arise from a drug-drug interaction in four cases (22%). Although all ADRs fulfilled the criteria for mandatory reporting, none of them were reported to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (SADRAC). CONCLUSIONS: The observed frequency of ADR-related acute hospital admissions in this pilot study is similar to earlier reported data from Sweden and abroad. Almost all of these reactions were known pharmacological (type A) reactions and many therefore theoretically preventable. In contrast to many prospective and costly studies, this retrospective analysis of computerized medical records offered a simple method that can be used in routine health care and also serve as an indicator of the quality of drug use.
PubMed ID
16184621 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aggregated and individual pharmacy record data. Association between antibiotic and antihypertensive drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154756
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jan;65(1):107-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009

Alopecia associated with treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81812
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Oct;15(10):719-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Hedenmalm Karin
Sundström Anders
Spigset Olav
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. karin.hedenmalm@mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Oct;15(10):719-25
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alopecia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bayes Theorem
Citalopram - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Sertraline - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the association between alopecia and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) by estimating reporting rates and by making association comparisons within databases of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). METHODS: All reports of alopecia with marketed SSRIs until the end of 2004 were identified in SWEDIS, the national Swedish database for spontaneously reported ADRs, and in Vigibase, the international ADR database of the World Health Organization. Total SSRI sales volumes in Sweden until the end of 2004 were obtained from the National Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies. The Bayes' Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) method was used to estimate associations between alopecia and each of the SSRIs within the two databases. RESULTS: A total of 27 reports of alopecia were identified in SWEDIS. As two reports concerned the use of two SSRIs, there was a total of 29 drug-ADR combinations. All except three reports concerned women (88.9%). The reporting rate of alopecia in Sweden was significantly higher with sertraline compared with citalopram; 20.1 (95%CI 10.7-34.4) reports per million patient-years versus 4.5 (95%CI 1.8-9.3) reports per million patient-years. No significant differences in reporting rates were noted for the remaining SSRIs. Sertraline also showed a statistically significant association with alopecia in both SWEDIS and Vigibase. Citalopram was significantly associated with alopecia in Vigibase, but not in SWEDIS. No statistically significant associations were found for any of the other SSRIs. CONCLUSIONS: Alopecia appears to be a rare ADR to SSRIs. The risk of alopecia seems to vary between the different SSRIs, and might be higher in women than in men.
PubMed ID
16783834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysing duration of episodes of pharmacological care: an example of antidepressant use in Danish general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83059
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Gichangi Anthony
Andersen Morten
Kragstrup Jakob
Vach Werner
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. anthony@stat.sdu.dk
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):167-77
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Episode of Care
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacoepidemiology - methods
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Analysing duration of treatment episodes has become a standard task in many pharmacoepidemiological studies. However, such analyses are often carried out in a rather simplistic manner and more subtle issues are often ignored. In this paper, methods of analysing duration treatment episodes beyond simple analyses allowing investigation of the risk for certain events over time are demonstrated. In particular, the use of cumulative incidence functions, cause-specific hazard functions, hazard rate models and expected mortality in analysing duration of episodes is presented. We used these statistical techniques in analysing the early treatment history of patients who started a regular treatment with antidepressant drugs in the primary health care sector in Denmark. We have extracted some important features: The risk of discontinuing and switching treatment was very high around 10 weeks after starting treatment. After discontinuing the first treatment period, many patients soon started a second treatment period depending on the duration of the first treatment period with highest risk around 10 weeks. The mortality rate among the patients in treatment was about three times higher than the expected mortality. The risk of dying immediately after stopping treatment was about twice the expected mortality. The analysis suggests that: (1) there is a critical period for a first discontinuing, switching and restarting treatment around 10 weeks, (2) the GPs prescribing habits have more influence on the patterns than patient or drug characteristics, (3) over time Danish GPs tend to prolong the duration of first treatment period and avoid longer treatment breaks.
PubMed ID
16315340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Another piece of the inhaled corticosteroids-in-COPD puzzle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193526
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Aug 15;164(4):514-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2001

184 records – page 1 of 19.