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Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115926
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:183
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ekaterina V Fedorova
Roman V Skochilov
Robert Heimer
Patricia Case
Leo Beletsky
Lauretta E Grau
Andrey P Kozlov
Alla V Shaboltas
Author Affiliation
The Biomedical Center, 8, Viborgskaya Street, St. Petersburg 194044, Russia. ekaterina_fedorova@yahoo.com
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:183
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Commerce - methods
Female
HIV Infections - etiology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Pharmacies - classification - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Syringes - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city's estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg.
965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts--one central and one peripheral--that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts.
No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten.
Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists' willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes in the federal list of mandatory medical products sold by pharmacies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23452390 View in PubMed
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Analgesic medication--communication at pharmacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71227
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2003 Oct;51(2):155-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Pär Skoglund
Dag Isacson
Karin I Kjellgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2003 Oct;51(2):155-61
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Communication
Community Pharmacy Services
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Education
Patient Participation - psychology
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Role
Sweden
Tape Recording
Abstract
Treatment conducted in co-operation with the client is decisive for a successful result i.e. adherence to medication, satisfaction and improved health outcome. The aim of this study was to capture the communication between clients and pharmacists when dispensing prescriptions of analgesics in community pharmacies. The study was based on 42 authentic audio-recordings of clients' communication with pharmacists. Most clients had a passive role and the analysis testify to a short and asymmetric communication between the interlocutors. On average, the clients asked three questions. One-third of these questions were related to medication, i.e. dose, effect, written information, symptoms or disease. Of the questions asked by pharmacists, 2% were open in character. The study confirms previous research in other settings on caregiver dominance in consultations. Concordance in pharmaceutical care assumes a much more active client. Therefore facilitating a more active role for the clients at pharmacies is of the outmost importance.
PubMed ID
14572945 View in PubMed
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An online knowledge resource and questionnaires as a continuing pharmacy education tool to document reflective learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122890
Source
Am J Pharm Educ. 2012 Jun 18;76(5):82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-18-2012
Author
Jason W Budzinski
Barbara Farrell
Pierre Pluye
Roland M Grad
Carol Repchinsky
Barbara Jovaisas
Janique Johnson-Lafleur
Author Affiliation
Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Pharm Educ. 2012 Jun 18;76(5):82
Date
Jun-18-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Pharmacy, Continuing - methods
Educational Measurement
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internet
Motivation
Needs Assessment
Pharmacists - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
To assess the use of an electronic knowledge resource to document continuing education activities and reveal educational needs of practicing pharmacists.
Over a 38-week period, 67 e-mails were sent to 6,500 Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) members. Each e-mail contained a link to an e-Therapeutics+ Highlight, a factual excerpt of selected content from an online drug and therapeutic knowledge resource. Participants were then prompted to complete a pop-up questionnaire.
Members completed 4,140 questionnaires. Participants attributed the information they learned in the Highlights to practice improvements (50.4%), learning (57.0%), and motivation to learn more (57.4%).
Reading Highlight excerpts and completing Web-based questionnaires is an effective method of continuing education that could be easily documented and tracked, making it an effective tool for use with e-portfolios.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22761523 View in PubMed
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Assessing safety culture in pharmacies: the psychometric validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in a national sample of community pharmacies in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144322
Source
BMC Clin Pharmacol. 2010;10:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Annika Nordén-Hägg
J Bryan Sexton
Sofia Kälvemark-Sporrong
Lena Ring
Asa Kettis-Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. annikanordn.h@telia.com
Source
BMC Clin Pharmacol. 2010;10:8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Organizational Culture
Pharmacies - standards
Pharmacists - psychology - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Students, Pharmacy - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Safety culture assessment is increasingly recognized as an important component in healthcare quality improvement, also in pharmacies. One of the most commonly used and rigorously validated tools to measure safety culture is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; SAQ. This study presents the validation of the SAQ for use in Swedish pharmacies. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented
The original English language version of the SAQ was translated and adapted to the Swedish context and distributed by e-mail. The survey was carried out on a national basis, covering all 870 Swedish community pharmacies. In total, 7,244 questionnaires were distributed. Scale psychometrics were analysed using Cronbach alphas and intercorrelations among the scales. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted.
SAQ data from 828 community pharmacies in Sweden, including 4,090 (60.22%) pharmacy personnel out of 6,683 eligible respondents, were received. There were 252 (28.97%) pharmacies that met the inclusion criteria of having at least 5 respondents and a minimum response rate of 60% within that pharmacy.The coefficient alpha value for each of the SAQ scales ranged from .72 to .89. The internal consistency results, in conjunction with the confirmatory factor analysis results, demonstrate that the Swedish translation of the SAQ has acceptable to good psychometric properties. Perceptions of the pharmacy (Teamwork Climate, Job Satisfaction, Perceptions of Management, Safety Climate, and Working Conditions) were moderately to highly correlated with one another whereas attitudes about stress (Stress Recognition) had only low correlations with other factors. Perceptions of management showed the most variability across pharmacies (SD = 26.66), whereas Stress Recognition showed the least (SD = 18.58). There was substantial variability ranging from 0% to 100% in the percent of positive scores for each of the factors across the 252 pharmacies.
The Swedish translation of the SAQ demonstrates acceptable construct validity, for capturing the frontline perspective of safety culture of community pharmacy staff. The psychometric results reported here met or exceeded standard guidelines, which is consistent with previous studies using the SAQ in other healthcare settings and other languages.
Notes
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Apr;12(2):112-812679507
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Cites: Ergonomics. 2006 Apr 15-May 15;49(5-6):503-1616717007
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:4416584553
Cites: J Perinatol. 2006 Aug;26(8):463-7016775621
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Cites: Health Serv Res. 2006 Aug;41(4 Pt 2):1599-61716898981
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Cites: Anesthesiology. 2006 Nov;105(5):877-8417065879
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2007 Jan;35(1):165-7617110876
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PubMed ID
20380741 View in PubMed
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Assessment of a fax document for transfer of medication information to family physicians and community pharmacists caring for hemodialysis outpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169777
Source
CANNT J. 2006 Jan-Mar;16(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karen D Riley
Lori D Wazny
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON.
Source
CANNT J. 2006 Jan-Mar;16(1):24-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Community Pharmacy Services - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care
Drug Information Services
Drug Therapy - contraindications - standards
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Medical Records - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Pharmacists - psychology
Physicians, Family - organization & administration - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Renal Dialysis
Telefacsimile - standards
Abstract
Studies have clearly identified the outpatient dialysis population as one that is at high risk for drug-related problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a fax document was useful for community pharmacies and family physicians to notify these health care providers that their patient was receiving hemodialysis, to update medication and allergy records, provide dosing information on antibiotics and drugs to avoid, facilitate communication from the hemodialysis unit, and to decide if this was a worthwhile project to continue on an on-going basis.
Fax documents were sent to community pharmacists and family physicians of 70 hemodialysis patients from two different hemodialysis satellite units. The fax document consisted of a brief cover letter with contact numbers, a copy of the patient's medication and allergy list, a table of appropriate antibiotic doses and medications to avoid in dialysis, and a survey to evaluate this project's usefulness. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant differences between the family physician and community pharmacist responses.
The survey response rate was 37%. Ninety-five per cent (20/21) of family physicians and 81% (22/27) of community pharmacists who responded to the survey would use the medication profile to update their records. Ninety-five per cent of family physicians and 93% of community pharmacies thought the fax document was an improvement in communication from the dialysis unit. Ninety per cent of family physicians and 85% of community pharmacies thought that the fax document was a worthwhile project for the dialysis unit to continue. No significant differences were found between family physician and community pharmacist responses.
Implementation of a fax document for the transfer of medication information to family physicians and community pharmacists caring for hemodialysis patients aids in updating medication and allergy profiles, improves communication fom the dialysis unit and is considered a worthwhile project to continue on an ongoing basis.
PubMed ID
16615703 View in PubMed
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Attitudes and behaviours of hospital pharmacy staff toward near misses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132205
Source
Healthc Q. 2011;14(3):48-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Colette B Raymond
Donna M M Woloschuk
Nick Honcharik
Author Affiliation
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Regional Pharmacy Program. craymond@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2011;14(3):48-56
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Manitoba
Medical Errors
Pharmacists - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Abstract
Near misses may be early warning signals for errors. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes and behaviours of Manitoba hospital pharmacists and technicians toward near misses and reporting. A web-based survey of pharmacy staff at hospitals (all have non-punitive paper-based incident reporting systems) was conducted in 2009. Survey respondents were asked via a validated survey about experience with and attitudes and behaviours toward near misses. Factor analysis and Cronbach's a were used to determine internal consistency reliability. Differences between pharmacists and technicians were compared using Fisher's exact test for categorical data and t tests for survey scales. Of 37 hospitals, one large tertiary care hospital declined to participate. Of approximately 500 pharmacy staff, 122 (24%) responded. The majority (54.1%) were pharmacists, and most worked in Winnipeg (73.8%). The majority of respondents (62% overall--48% of technicians and 73% of pharmacists (p=.008)--had experienced at least one near miss within the previous three months. However, only 27% had reported a near miss with occurrence-reporting forms. There was no difference in the reporting behaviours scale (eight items, Cronbach's a=.824) between pharmacists and technicians (pharmacist score 30.9 ± 4.8, technician score 29.6 ± 6.0; p=.215). There was no difference in the attitudes scale (23 items, Cronbach's a=.873) between pharmacists and technicians (pharmacist score 81.9 ± 9.4, technician score 80.2 ± 10.6; p=.388). We observed similar behaviours and attitudes between hospital pharmacists and technicians, although reporting of near misses was low. Education of pharmacy staff and managers about near misses may help to encourage reporting.
PubMed ID
21841377 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of Finnish community pharmacists toward concordance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178074
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2004 Nov;38(11):1946-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Heli M Kansanaho
Inka I Puumalainen
Maaret M Varunki
Marja Sa Airaksinen
Parisa Aslani
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, Division of Social Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. heli.kansanaho@helsinki.fi
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2004 Nov;38(11):1946-53
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Pharmacy Services
Counseling
Educational Status
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
Concordance is a new model of interaction between healthcare professionals and patients. The work of pharmacists and patients in the consultation is a negotiation between equals, and the aim is therapeutic alliance between them.
To assess Finnish community pharmacists' attitudes toward concordance and its perceived impact on pharmacist-patient consultations during a 4-year Finnish project (TIPPA Project 2000-2003) aimed at promoting patient counseling.
A survey of a random sample of 734 community pharmacists in Finland was conducted in 2002. The questionnaire included an attitudinal scale and 2 open-ended questions on the impact of the TIPPA Project on patient counseling. Attitudes toward concordance were measured using a modified version of the LATCon scale. The construct validity and internal consistency of the scale were evaluated using factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. Mean summative factor scores (MSS) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each factor. The responses to the open-ended questions were content analyzed.
A response rate of 51% (n = 376) was obtained. Almost 80% of the respondents strongly agreed that the highest priority in patient counseling was to establish a therapeutic alliance between the pharmacist and patient. Factor analysis of the attitudinal scale yielded 3 primary factors explaining 37.6% of the variance, interpreted as respecting patients' beliefs (alpha = 0.60; MSS = 1.90; 95% CI 2.25 to 2.40), establishing a therapeutic alliance (alpha = 0.65; MSS = 1.36; 95% CI 1.31 to 1.40), and sensitivity to patients' reactions (alpha = 0.66; MSS = 2.33; 95% CI 1.83 to 1.96). Results of the open-ended questions indicated that the TIPPA Project had a positive impact on pharmacists' attitudes toward concordance.
Respondents to our survey were supportive of concordance. The TIPPA Project elicited a positive impact on pharmacists' attitudes toward counseling. Pharmacist education through programs such as TIPPA can aid in the implementation of a concordance-based counseling practice.
PubMed ID
15466906 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of pharmaceutical opinions written in a Quebec community pharmacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223673
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 1992 Jun;26(6):835-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
J. Dumas
J. Matte
Author Affiliation
Ecole de pharmacie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 1992 Jun;26(6):835-9
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Pharmacy Services - economics
Counseling
Data Collection
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Patient Education as Topic
Pharmacists - psychology
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health
Abstract
To describe the characteristics of pharmaceutical opinions written in a community pharmacy and to estimate the possible effects of these opinions on patient drug profiles.
Retrospective survey.
The community pharmacy where these opinions were written is located in a rural area of the province of Quebec. Only health-related items are sold and no merchandise is displayed in this pharmacy.
Ten pharmacists worked at this pharmacy during the period of the study.
Pharmacists were paid when they sent advice to a patient or a physician about the patient's drug profile or about the therapeutic value of a prescribed treatment. This survey included recommendations made from 1978 to 1983. A sample of 600 opinions was drawn at random from a total of 1992 opinions that had been written at the site of the study.
The impact of each opinion was assessed by analyzing patient drug profiles for three months after the opinion was written to determine if the recipient had followed the pharmacist's recommendation.
Pharmacists, on their own initiative, sent 97.9 percent of the opinions. Only 1.7 percent of the opinions were requested by patients and 0.4 percent by physicians. Most opinions were addressed to patients (86.7 percent) rather than to physicians (13.3 percent). Almost four of five recommendations sent to patients were about compliance (45.1 percent) or were suggestions for improving the therapeutic effect of a medication or replacing a drug with nondrug treatment (33.4 percent). The three most common recommendations sent to prescribers were to replace one drug with another (25 percent), to change the dose or dosing schedule of a drug (16.3 percent), and to discontinue drug treatment (16.3 percent). Chemical stability, underuse or overuse of a medication, and adverse effects were the most frequent causes of recommendations sent to patients. Adverse effects, interactions, and the underuse of a medication were the most frequent reasons for recommendations sent to physicians. The proportion of recommendations that were implemented was 77.7 percent for patients and 58.1 percent for physicians.
The pharmaceutical opinion seemed to be a good means of communicating with patients and prescribers on a wide variety of problems encountered in a community pharmacy. It allowed pharmacists to be paid for their expertise even if a drug was not dispensed. Also, the pharmaceutical opinion could compensate for the loss of income when the pharmacist recommended replacing a prescribed medicine with nondrug treatment.
PubMed ID
1611169 View in PubMed
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Community pharmacists as educators in Danish residential facilities: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291049
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2017 Aug; 25(4):282-291
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Anna Mygind
Mira El-Souri
Kirsten Pultz
Charlotte Rossing
Linda A Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Pharmakon, Danish College for Pharmacy Practice, Hillerød, Denmark.
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2017 Aug; 25(4):282-291
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Pharmacy Services - organization & administration
Denmark
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Intersectoral Collaboration
Learning
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Patient Safety
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Staff Development - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Engagement
Abstract
To explore experiences with engaging community pharmacists in educational programmes on quality and safety in medication handling in residential facilities for the disabled.
A secondary analysis of data from two Danish intervention studies where community pharmacists were engaged in educational programmes. Data included 10 semi-structured interviews with staff, five semi-structured interviews and three open-ended questionnaires with residential facility managers, and five open-ended questionnaires to community pharmacists. Data were thematically coded to identify key points pertaining to the themes 'pharmacists as educators' and 'perceived effects of engaging pharmacists in competence development'.
As educators, pharmacists were successful as medicines experts. Some pharmacists experienced pedagogical challenges. Previous teaching experience and obtained knowledge of the local residential facility before teaching often provided sufficient pedagogical skills and tailored teaching to local needs. Effects of engaging community pharmacists included in most instances improved cooperation between residential facilities and community pharmacies through a trustful relationship and improved dialogue about the residents' medication. Other effects included a perception of improved patient safety, teaching skills and branding of the pharmacy.
Community pharmacists provide a resource to engage in educational programmes on medication handling in residential facilities, which may facilitate improved cooperation between community pharmacies and residential facilities. However, development of pedagogical competences and understandings of local settings are prerequisites for facilities and pharmacists to experience the programmes as successful.
PubMed ID
27632944 View in PubMed
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Community pharmacists' attitudes toward and professional interactions with users of psychiatric medication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177154
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2004 Dec;55(12):1434-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Vinay Phokeo
Beth Sproule
Lalitha Raman-Wilms
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2004 Dec;55(12):1434-6
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Mental Disorders - drug therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pharmacies
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Abstract
Consumers of psychiatric medications or services may be stigmatized by health care providers. The authors surveyed community pharmacists (N=283) in the greater Toronto area to determine their attitudes toward and professional interactions with patients who used psychiatric medications and those who used cardiovascular medications. Despite generally positive attitudes, pharmacists reported feeling more uncomfortable discussing symptoms and medications with patients who have mental illness than with patients who have cardiovascular problems. Patients with mental illness appeared to receive fewer pharmacy services than patients with cardiovascular disorders. Barriers to receipt of counseling included a lack of privacy and inadequate training. Adequate training in mental health may be key in improving the professional interactions of community pharmacists toward patients who use psychiatric medication.
PubMed ID
15572574 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.