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Antineoplastic agent workplace contamination study: the Alberta Cancer Board Pharmacy perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171328
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2005 Sep;11(3):101-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Heidi Schulz
Susan Bigelow
Roxanne Dobish
Carole R Chambers
Author Affiliation
Cross Cancer Institute Site, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. heidis@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2005 Sep;11(3):101-9
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Antineoplastic Agents - analysis
Cancer Care Facilities
Cyclophosphamide - analysis
Drug Packaging
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Feasibility Studies
Gloves, Protective - standards
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Pharmacies - standards
Pharmacy - standards
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Safety Management
Abstract
To investigate the feasibility of routine monitoring for workplace antineoplastic agent contamination in the Alberta Cancer Board (ACB) pharmacy practice environment.
The ACB in the Canadian province of Alberta, which includes two public tertiary centres and 17 associated community satellite sites based around the province in existing hospitals.
Obtained organizational support and input prior to launching the feasibility study (Phase I). Samples were analysed for a common cytotoxic agent - cyclophosphamide. Surfaces chosen were within the biological safety cabinets, workplace counter tops and on external surfaces of vials provided by manufacturers. Blank samples and known contaminated controls were included in Phase I to reconfirm the methodology in a previously published study. Feasibility aspects of logistics and financial expenses were examined. A second phase (Phase II) was completed to test other areas of the pharmacy and vials, with blank samples included to reconfirm previously mentioned methodology.
The results determined that the samples tested were below acceptable detection limits with the exception of the known contaminated sample (Phase I) and exterior surfaces of vials (Phase II).
This project has increased staff awareness of the sources for antineoplastic agent workplace contamination. Some practice changes were instituted during the project itself. Logistics and expenses were realistic for routine monitoring to be adopted.
PubMed ID
16390598 View in PubMed
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Assessing safety culture in pharmacies: the psychometric validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in a national sample of community pharmacies in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144322
Source
BMC Clin Pharmacol. 2010;10:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Annika Nordén-Hägg
J Bryan Sexton
Sofia Kälvemark-Sporrong
Lena Ring
Asa Kettis-Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. annikanordn.h@telia.com
Source
BMC Clin Pharmacol. 2010;10:8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Organizational Culture
Pharmacies - standards
Pharmacists - psychology - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Students, Pharmacy - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Safety culture assessment is increasingly recognized as an important component in healthcare quality improvement, also in pharmacies. One of the most commonly used and rigorously validated tools to measure safety culture is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; SAQ. This study presents the validation of the SAQ for use in Swedish pharmacies. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented
The original English language version of the SAQ was translated and adapted to the Swedish context and distributed by e-mail. The survey was carried out on a national basis, covering all 870 Swedish community pharmacies. In total, 7,244 questionnaires were distributed. Scale psychometrics were analysed using Cronbach alphas and intercorrelations among the scales. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted.
SAQ data from 828 community pharmacies in Sweden, including 4,090 (60.22%) pharmacy personnel out of 6,683 eligible respondents, were received. There were 252 (28.97%) pharmacies that met the inclusion criteria of having at least 5 respondents and a minimum response rate of 60% within that pharmacy.The coefficient alpha value for each of the SAQ scales ranged from .72 to .89. The internal consistency results, in conjunction with the confirmatory factor analysis results, demonstrate that the Swedish translation of the SAQ has acceptable to good psychometric properties. Perceptions of the pharmacy (Teamwork Climate, Job Satisfaction, Perceptions of Management, Safety Climate, and Working Conditions) were moderately to highly correlated with one another whereas attitudes about stress (Stress Recognition) had only low correlations with other factors. Perceptions of management showed the most variability across pharmacies (SD = 26.66), whereas Stress Recognition showed the least (SD = 18.58). There was substantial variability ranging from 0% to 100% in the percent of positive scores for each of the factors across the 252 pharmacies.
The Swedish translation of the SAQ demonstrates acceptable construct validity, for capturing the frontline perspective of safety culture of community pharmacy staff. The psychometric results reported here met or exceeded standard guidelines, which is consistent with previous studies using the SAQ in other healthcare settings and other languages.
Notes
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Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2007 Nov;33(11):699-703, 64518074719
Cites: J Crit Care. 2008 Jun;23(2):207-2118538214
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:19118808693
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 May;200(5):492.e1-819249729
PubMed ID
20380741 View in PubMed
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Assessment of ePrescription quality: an observational study at three mail-order pharmacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90289
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Astrand Bengt
Montelius Emelie
Petersson Göran
Ekedahl Anders
Author Affiliation
Apoteket AB, and School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences, University of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden. bengt.astrand@hik.se
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Prescribing - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Observation
Pharmacies - standards
Postal Service
Prescription Drugs
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The introduction of electronic transfer of prescriptions (ETP) or ePrescriptions in ambulatory health care has been suggested to have a positive impact on the prescribing and dispensing processes. Thereby, implying that ePrescribing can improve safety, quality, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness. In December 2007, 68% of all new prescriptions were transferred electronically in Sweden. The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of ePrescriptions by comparing the proportions of ePrescriptions and non-electronic prescriptions necessitating a clarification contact (correction, completion or change) with the prescriber at the time of dispensing. METHODS: A direct observational study was performed at three Swedish mail-order pharmacies which were known to dispense a large proportion of ePrescriptions (38-75%). Data were gathered on all ePrescriptions dispensed at these pharmacies over a three week period in February 2006. All clarification contacts with prescribers were included in the study and were classified and assessed in comparison with all drug prescriptions dispensed at the same pharmacies over the specified period. RESULTS: Of the 31225 prescriptions dispensed during the study period, clarification contacts were made for 2.0% (147/7532) of new ePrescriptions and 1.2% (79/6833) of new non-electronic prescriptions. This represented a relative risk (RR) of 1.7 (95% CI 1.3-2.2) for new ePrescriptions compared to new non-electronic prescriptions. The increased RR was mainly due to 'Dosage and directions for use', which had an RR of 7.6 (95% CI 2.8-20.4) when compared to other clarification contacts. In all, 89.5% of the suggested pharmacist interventions were accepted by the prescriber, 77.7% (192/247) as suggested and an additional 11.7% (29/247) after a modification during contact with the prescriber. CONCLUSION: The increased proportion of prescriptions necessitating a clarification contact for new ePrescriptions compared to new non-electronic prescriptions indicates the need for an increased focus on quality aspects in ePrescribing deployment. ETP technology should be developed towards a two-way communication between the prescriber and the pharmacist with automated checks of missing, inaccurate, or ambiguous information. This would enhance safety and quality for the patient and also improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness within the health care system.
PubMed ID
19171038 View in PubMed
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Canada: pharmacy tobacco sales to mentally ill people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164335
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Apr;16(2):75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007

Coding accuracy of administrative drug claims in the Ontario Drug Benefit database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184346
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2003;10(2):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Adrian R Levy
Bernie J O'Brien
Connie Sellors
Paul Grootendorst
Donald Willison
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Evaluation & Outcome Sciences, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. alevy@cheos.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2003;10(2):67-71
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems - standards
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Medical Audit
Ontario
Pharmacies - standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Every year in Ontario, the records of over 42 million prescriptions dispensed to persons eligible for Ontario Drug Benefit (ODB) benefits are transmitted to a central database. The ODB database is the second largest database of medications in Canada, containing records on almost half of all medications dispensed in Ontario. There is no information about the reliability of the coding on the ODB drug claims database and, therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate the reliability of coding of the Drug Identification Number, and the date, quantity and duration of the dispensation on claims sent to the ODB.
To meet this objective, approximately 100 randomly selected prescriptions dispensed from each of 50 pharmacies in southern Ontario between July 1, 1998 and December 31, 1999 were audited. For each claim, the written information on the prescription was compared with the electronic information submitted to the ODB database. Logistic regression was used to test the association between coding errors and the location, owner affiliation, and productivity of each pharmacy (defined as the annual volume of dispensations divided by the annual number of hours worked by all pharmacists and pharmacy assistants).
Of the 183 pharmacies owners invited to participate, consent to abstract information was obtained in 50, yielding a participation rate of 27%. Of the 5155 dispensed prescriptions, 37 errors were found, yielding an overall error rate of 0.7% (95% CI 0.5% to 0.9%). None of the characteristics of pharmacies that were examined (location, owner affiliation, productivity) was associated with coding errors.
Pharmacists almost always dispense the medication that is prescribed and this information is reliably transmitted to the ODB drug claims database. This means that any conclusions drawn by researchers using these data are not likely to be compromised by low coding reliability.
PubMed ID
12879144 View in PubMed
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Community pharmacy incident reporting: a new tool for community pharmacies in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139973
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:16-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Certina Ho
Patricia Hung
Gary Lee
Medina Kadija
Author Affiliation
Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario. cho@ismp-canada.org
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:16-24
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - organization & administration
Canada
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Pharmacies - standards - statistics & numerical data
Program Development
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Incident reporting offers insight into a variety of intricate processes in healthcare. However, it has been found that medication incidents are under reported in the community pharmacy setting. The Community Pharmacy Incident Reporting (CPhIR) program was created by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada specifically for incident reporting in the community pharmacy setting in Canada. The initial development of key elements for CPhIR included several focus-group teleconferences with pharmacists from Ontario and Nova Scotia. Throughout the development and release of the CPhIR pilot, feedback from pharmacists and pharmacy technicians was constantly incorporated into the reporting program. After several rounds of iterative feedback, testing and consultation with community pharmacy practitioners, a final version of the CPhIR program, together with self-directed training materials, is now ready to launch. The CPhIR program provides users with a one-stop platform to report and record medication incidents, export data for customized analysis and view comparisons of individual and aggregate data. These unique functions allow for a detailed analysis of underlying contributing factors in medication incidents. A communication piece for pharmacies to share their experiences is in the process of development. To ensure the success of the CPhIR program, a patient safety culture must be established. By gaining a deeper understanding of possible causes of medication incidents, community pharmacies can implement system-based strategies for quality improvement and to prevent potential errors from occurring again in the future. This article highlights key features of the CPhIR program that will assist community pharmacies to improve their drug distribution system and, ultimately, enhance patient safety.
PubMed ID
20959726 View in PubMed
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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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Drug information from pharmacies: desire for more spontaneous information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220350
Source
Med Care. 1993 Sep;31(9):846-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993

The ethics of Canadian entry-to-practice pain competencies: how are we doing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115877
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2013 Jan-Feb;18(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy Watt-Watson
Elizabeth Peter
A John Clark
Anne Dewar
Thomas Hadjistavropoulos
Pat Morley-Forster
Christine O'Leary
Lalitha Raman-Wilms
Anita Unruh
Karen Webber
Marsha Campbell-Yeo
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. j.watt.watson@utoronto.ca
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2013 Jan-Feb;18(1):25-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Dental - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Education, Nursing - standards
Education, Pharmacy - standards
Education, Professional - standards
Ethics, Clinical - education
Health Personnel - standards
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Pain
Physical Therapy Specialty - standards
Abstract
Although unrelieved pain continues to represent a significant problem, prelicensure educational programs tend to include little content related to pain. Standards for professional competence strongly influence curricula and have the potential to ensure that health science students have the knowledge and skill to manage pain in a way that also allows them to meet professional ethical standards.
To perform a systematic, comprehensive examination to determine the entry-to-practice competencies related to pain required for Canadian health science and veterinary students, and to examine how the presence and absence of pain competencies relate to key competencies of an ethical nature.
Entry-to-practice competency requirements related to pain knowledge, skill and judgment were surveyed from national, provincial and territorial documents for dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology and veterinary medicine.
Dentistry included two and nursing included nine specific pain competencies. No references to competencies related to pain were found in the remaining health science documents. In contrast, the national competency requirements for veterinary medicine, surveyed as a comparison, included nine pain competencies. All documents included competencies pertaining to ethics.
The lack of competencies related to pain has implications for advancing skillful and ethical practice. The lack of attention to pain competencies limits the capacity of health care professionals to alleviate suffering, foster autonomy and use resources justly. Influencing professional bodies to increase the number of required entry-to-practice pain competencies may ultimately have the greatest impact on education and practice.
Notes
Cites: Anaesth Intensive Care. 2011 Jan;39(1):11-421375085
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2011 Mar-Apr;16(2):77-8021499581
Cites: J Pain. 2011 Jul;12(7):725-4621435953
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2002 Winter;7(4):179-8412518174
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jan 9;287(2):226-3511779266
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2011 Sep;15(8):789-9521330174
Cites: Pain. 2004 May;109(1-2):73-8515082128
Cites: Pain. 2004 Jul;110(1-2):140-815275761
Cites: Lancet. 2006 May 13;367(9522):1618-2516698416
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2007 Spring;12(1):39-4717372633
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2007 Jul;105(1):205-2117578977
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2007 Aug;29(5):561-80; discussion 581-817548894
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2008 Apr;34(4):285-9618375683
Cites: Pain Med. 2009 Apr;10(3):506-2019254336
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2009 May-Jun;14(3):211-619547760
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2009 Nov-Dec;14(6):439-4420011714
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2010 Apr;112(4):957-6920234307
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 2010 Jun;57(6):539-4820393821
PubMed ID
23457683 View in PubMed
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Feedback in patient counselling training--pharmacy students' opinions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159719
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Mar;70(3):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Marja-Leena Hyvärinen
Paavo Tanskanen
Nina Katajavuori
Pekka Isotalus
Author Affiliation
Language Centre, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland. marjaleena.hyvarinen@uku.fi
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Mar;70(3):363-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Communication
Counseling - education
Education, Pharmacy - standards
Feedback, Psychological
Finland
Guidelines as Topic - standards
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - standards
Interprofessional Relations
Mentors - education - psychology
Pharmacies
Professional Competence - standards
Qualitative Research
Students, Pharmacy - psychology
Abstract
The aims were to analyse Finnish pharmacy students' opinions of feedback given to them in patient counselling training during their internship period, and to evaluate the guidelines used.
The study was based on reports written by 136 students, analysed qualitatively. To examine the significance of the guidelines and the perceived quality of the feedback, students were categorised into groups. Correlations were assessed by frequencies and cross-tabulations.
A statistically significant correlation was found (p
PubMed ID
18093791 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.