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3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
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A 10 year asthma programme in Finland: major change for the better.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168103
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
T. Haahtela
L E Tuomisto
A. Pietinalho
T. Klaukka
M. Erhola
M. Kaila
M M Nieminen
E. Kontula
L A Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P O Box 160, FIN-00029 HUS, Finland. tari.haahtela@hus.fi
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Communication
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Insurance, Disability - economics
Interprofessional Relations
National Health Programs - economics - trends
Pharmaceutical Services - standards
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A National Asthma Programme was undertaken in Finland from 1994 to 2004 to improve asthma care and prevent an increase in costs. The main goal was to lessen the burden of asthma to individuals and society.
The action programme focused on implementation of new knowledge, especially for primary care. The main premise underpinning the campaign was that asthma is an inflammatory disease and requires anti-inflammatory treatment from the outset. The key for implementation was an effective network of asthma-responsible professionals and development of a post hoc evaluation strategy. In 1997 Finnish pharmacies were included in the Pharmacy Programme and in 2002 a Childhood Asthma mini-Programme was launched.
The incidence of asthma is still increasing, but the burden of asthma has decreased considerably. The number of hospital days has fallen by 54% from 110 000 in 1993 to 51 000 in 2003, 69% in relation to the number of asthmatics (n = 135 363 and 207 757, respectively), with the trend still downwards. In 1993, 7212 patients of working age (9% of 80 133 asthmatics) received a disability pension from the Social Insurance Institution compared with 1741 in 2003 (1.5% of 116 067 asthmatics). The absolute decrease was 76%, and 83% in relation to the number of asthmatics. The increase in the cost of asthma (compensation for disability, drugs, hospital care, and outpatient doctor visits) ended: in 1993 the costs were 218 million euro which had fallen to 213.5 million euro in 2003. Costs per patient per year have decreased 36% (from 1611 euro to 1031 euro).
It is possible to reduce the morbidity of asthma and its impact on individuals as well as on society. Improvements would have taken place without the programme, but not of this magnitude.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16877690 View in PubMed
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Adherence to statin therapy under drug cost sharing in patients with and without acute myocardial infarction: a population-based natural experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164224
Source
Circulation. 2007 Apr 24;115(16):2128-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2007
Author
Sebastian Schneeweiss
Amanda R Patrick
Malcolm Maclure
Colin R Dormuth
Robert J Glynn
Author Affiliation
Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont St, Suite 3030, Boston, MA 02120, USA. schneeweiss@post.harvard.edu
Source
Circulation. 2007 Apr 24;115(16):2128-35
Date
Apr-24-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Cost Sharing - economics - statistics & numerical data
Deductibles and Coinsurance - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Costs
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Insurance Coverage - economics - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
National Health Programs - economics - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
As medication spending grows, Medicare Part D will need to adapt its coverage policies according to emerging evidence from a variety of insurance policies. We sought to evaluate the consequences of copayment and coinsurance policies on the initiation of statin therapy after acute myocardial infarction and adherence to therapy in statin initiators using a natural experiment of all British Columbia residents aged 66 years and older.
Three consecutive cohorts that included all patients who began statin therapy during full drug coverage (2001), coverage with a $10 or $25 copay (2002), and coverage with a 25% coinsurance benefit (2003-2004) were followed up with linked healthcare utilization data (n=51,561). Follow-up of cohorts was 9 months after each policy change. Adherence to statin therapy was defined as > or = 80% of days covered. Relative to full-coverage policies, adherence to new statin therapy was significantly reduced, from 55.8% to 50.5%, under a fixed copayment policy (-5.4% points; 95% CI, -6.4% to -4.4%) and the subsequent coinsurance policy (-5.4% points; 95% CI, -6.3% to -4.4%). An uninterrupted increase in the proportion of patients initiating statin therapy after an acute myocardial infarction (1.7% points per quarter) was observed over the study period, similar to a Pennsylvania control population with full coverage. Sudden changes to full out-of-pocket spending, similar to Medicare's Part D "doughnut hole," almost doubled the risk of stopping statins (adjusted odds ratio, 1.94, 95% CI, 1.82 to 2.08).
Fixed patient copayment and coinsurance policies have negative effects on adherence to statin lipid-lowering drug therapy but not on their initiation after myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
17420348 View in PubMed
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Administrative claims data analysis of nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149161
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Andrea L Murphy
Ruth Martin-Misener
Charmaine Cooke
Ingrid Sketris
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. andrea.murphy@dal.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - economics - nursing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study to identify the patterns of prescribing by primary health care nurse practitioners for a cohort of older adults.
The older adult population is known to receive complex pharmacotherapy. Monitoring prescribing to older adults can inform quality improvement initiatives. In comparison to other countries, research examining nurse practitioner prescribing in Canada is limited. Nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults is relatively unexplored in the international literature. Although commonly used to study physician prescribing, few studies have used claims data from drug insurance programmes to investigate nurse practitioner prescribing.
Drug claims for prescriptions written by nurse practitioners from fiscal years 2004/05 to 2006/07 for beneficiaries of the Nova Scotia Seniors' Pharmacare programme were analysed. Data were retrieved and analysed in May 2008. Prescribing was described for each drug using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code classification system by usage and costs for each fiscal year.
Antimicrobials and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs consistently represented the top ranked groups for prescription volume and cost. Over the three fiscal years, antimicrobial prescription rates declined relative to rates of other groups of medications. Prescription volume per nurse doubled and cost per prescription increased by approximately 20%.
Prescription claims data can be used to characterize the prescribing trends of nurse practitioners. Research linking patient characteristics, including diagnoses, to prescriptions is needed to assess prescribing quality. Some potential areas of improvement were identified with antimicrobial and non-steroidal antiinflammatory selection.
PubMed ID
19674174 View in PubMed
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Adoption of celecoxib and rofecoxib: a nationwide database study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175412
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2005 Apr;30(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
A. Helin-Salmivaara
R. Huupponen
A. Virtanen
T. Klaukka
Author Affiliation
Centre for Pharmacotherapy Development, Helsinki, Finland. arja.helin-salmivaara@rohto.fi
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2005 Apr;30(2):145-52
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Child
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug Utilization Review - methods
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - trends - utilization
Lactones - therapeutic use
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing - economics - methods
Pyrazoles - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Specialization
Sulfonamides - therapeutic use
Sulfones - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Abstract
Cyclooxygenase 2-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, coxibs) are recommended primarily for patients at high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, most of them being elderly. Our objective was to describe and analyse patient- and physician-related factors affecting the adoption of celecoxib and rofecoxib 2 years after their launch in Finland.
Retrospective analysis of the nationwide Prescription Register. Physicians who had issued at least 200 reimbursed prescriptions in 2002 (n = 12 033, 80% of working-age Finnish physicians) were involved in the analysis.
Excluding patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), almost one-fifth (18%) of NSAIDs prescriptions were for coxibs. In patients with RA the share was 25%. The share of coxib prescriptions of all NSAIDs increased with age of the patient. Over one half (58%) of coxib prescriptions were issued for patients under 65 years of age. Specialists in physical and rehabilitation medicine were the fastest adopters of coxibs: one-third of their NSAID prescriptions in 2002 were for coxibs. Primary care physicians were the most conservative both in adopting and favouring coxibs.
Coxibs have gained the status of standard prescription NSAIDs within a few years. Their use should be restricted to patients who could benefit most from the use. Routine prescribing of expensive new drugs increases the drug bill without additional health gain.
PubMed ID
15811167 View in PubMed
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Advent of mail-order pharmacy causes concern among some pharmacists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215208
Source
CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1485-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1995
Author
D. Spurgeon
Source
CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1485-6
Date
May-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Pharmacies - utilization
Pharmacists
Postal Service
Professional-Patient Relations
Quebec
Societies, Pharmaceutical
Abstract
MEDITrust, a major mail-order pharmacy, promises low drug prices and dispensing fees for people who order drugs via mail. Its arrival has created some strong opposition in Quebec. The Canadian Pharmaceutical Association says the arrival of mail-order companies may give community pharmacists an opportunity to promote the benefits of face-to-face contact with pharmacists. The CMA's Dr. Anne Carter says there will always be a need for community pharmacists, who can provide drugs on short notice and provide personal counselling for patients.
PubMed ID
7728698 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug reaction reporting: how can drug consumption information add to analyses using spontaneous reports?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294818
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Apr; 74(4):497-504
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Kristian Svendsen
Kjell H Halvorsen
Solveig Vorren
Hilde Samdal
Beate Garcia
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital of North Norway, N-9038, Tromsø, Norway. kristian.0411@gmail.com.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Apr; 74(4):497-504
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Atorvastatin Calcium - adverse effects
Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Drug Utilization Review
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Male
Methylphenidate - adverse effects
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Services
Pharmacovigilance
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Simvastatin - adverse effects
Abstract
Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is a cornerstone in pharmacovigilance. However, information about the underlying consumption of drugs is rarely used when analysing spontaneous reports. The purpose of this study was to combine ADR reports with drug consumption data to demonstrate the additional information this gives in various scenarios, comparing different drugs, gender-stratified sub-populations and changes in reporting over time.
We combined all Norwegian ADR reports in 2004-2013 from the EudraVigilance database (n?=?14.028) with dispensing data from the Norwegian Prescription Database (more than 800 million dispensed prescriptions during 2004-2013). This was done in order to calculate drug-specific consumption-adjusted adverse drug reaction reporting rates (CADRRs) by dividing the number of reports for each drug with the number of users of the drug during the same time period.
Among the ten drugs with the highest number of ADR reports and the ten drugs with the highest CADRR, only four drugs were in both categories. This indicates that drugs with a high number of reports often also have a high number of users and that CADRR captures drugs with potentially relevant safety issues but a smaller number of users. Comparing reported ADRs in females and males using methylphenidate, we found that the two groups report different ADRs. Finally, we showed that changes in ADR reporting for simvastatin and atorvastatin during 2004-2013 were due to changes in consumption and that atorvastatin had a higher CADRR but fewer reports than simvastatin.
CADRR provides additional information compared with number of reports alone in studies using spontaneous reports. It is important for researchers to adjust for consumption whenever possible in pharmacovigilance studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29255992 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with prescription drug cost-sharing among poor and elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195424
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 24-31;285(4):421-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Tamblyn
R. Laprise
J A Hanley
M. Abrahamowicz
S. Scott
N. Mayo
J. Hurley
R. Grad
E. Latimer
R. Perreault
P. McLeod
A. Huang
P. Larochelle
L. Mallet
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital Site, Ross Pavilion, Room 4-12, 687 Pine Ave W, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1A1.
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 24-31;285(4):421-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cost Sharing - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Prescriptions - economics
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Poisson Distribution
Poverty
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec
Self Administration - economics - statistics & numerical data
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Rising costs of medications and inequities in access have sparked calls for drug policy reform in the United States and Canada. Control of drug expenditures by prescription cost-sharing for elderly persons and poor persons is a contentious issue because little is known about the health impact in these subgroups.
To determine (1) the impact of introducing prescription drug cost-sharing on use of essential and less essential drugs among elderly persons and welfare recipients and (2) rates of emergency department (ED) visits and serious adverse events associated with reductions in drug use before and after policy implementation.
Interrupted time-series analysis of data from 32 months before and 17 months after introduction of a prescription coinsurance and deductible cost-sharing policy in Quebec in 1996. Separate 10-month prepolicy control and postpolicy cohort studies were conducted to estimate the impact of the drug reform on adverse events.
A random sample of 93 950 elderly persons and 55 333 adult welfare medication recipients.
Mean daily number of essential and less essential drugs used per month, ED visits, and serious adverse events (hospitalization, nursing home admission, and mortality) before and after policy introduction.
After cost-sharing was introduced, use of essential drugs decreased by 9.12% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7%-9.6%) in elderly persons and by 14.42% (95% CI, 13.3%-15.6%) in welfare recipients; use of less essential drugs decreased by 15.14% (95% CI, 14.4%-15.9%) and 22.39% (95% CI, 20.9%-23.9%), respectively. The rate (per 10 000 person-months) of serious adverse events associated with reductions in use of essential drugs increased from 5.8 in the prepolicy control cohort to 12.6 in the postpolicy cohort in elderly persons (a net increase of 6.8 [95% CI, 5.6-8.0]) and from 14.7 to 27.6 in welfare recipients (a net increase of 12.9 [95% CI, 10.2-15.5]). Emergency department visit rates related to reductions in the use of essential drugs also increased by 14.2 (95% CI, 8.5-19.9) per 10 000 person-months in elderly persons (prepolicy control cohort, 32.9; postpolicy cohort, 47.1) and by 54.2 (95% CI, 33.5-74.8) among welfare recipients (prepolicy control cohort, 69.6; postpolicy cohort, 123.8). These increases were primarily due to an increase in the proportion of recipients who reduced their use of essential drugs. Reductions in the use of less essential drugs were not associated with an increase in risk of adverse events or ED visits.
In our study, increased cost-sharing for prescription drugs in elderly persons and welfare recipients was followed by reductions in use of essential drugs and a higher rate of serious adverse events and ED visits associated with these reductions.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2001 May 9;285(18):2328-911343477
PubMed ID
11242426 View in PubMed
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Aggregated and individual pharmacy record data. Association between antibiotic and antihypertensive drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154756
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jan;65(1):107-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009

Agreement between self-reported and pharmacy data on medication use in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145028
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marianne Haapea
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Lindeman
Matti Joukamaa
Hannu Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. marianne.haapea@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported (SR) medication use and pharmacy data for major psychoactive medications and three classes of medications used for different indications, and to determine the socio-economic factors associated with the congruence.
Postal questionnaire data collected in 1997 were compared with the register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland on the reimbursed prescriptions purchased during 1997. Altogether 7625 subjects were included in this study. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) system.
Kappa values were 0.77, 0.68, 0.84, 0.92 and 0.55 for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antidiabetics and beta-blocking agents, respectively. Prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa values were almost perfect (0.98-1.00). Reliability of antipsychotics use was better for married subjects than for those who were not married; and of antidepressants use for highly educated and married subjects than for those who were less educated and were not married. Altogether 414 (5.4%) responders and 285 (7.1%) non-responders had used at least one of the selected medications.
Agreement between the SR and pharmacy data was moderate for psychoactive medication use. Even though data collected by postal questionnaire may underestimate the prevalence of medication use due to non-participation it can be assumed accurate enough for study purposes.
PubMed ID
20209650 View in PubMed
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323 records – page 1 of 33.