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Acute Pancreatitis and Use of Pancreatitis-Associated Drugs: A 10-Year Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273714
Source
Pancreas. 2015 Oct;44(7):1096-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sara Bertilsson
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Source
Pancreas. 2015 Oct;44(7):1096-104
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the use of acute pancreatitis (AP)-associated drugs in patients with AP, the relation between sales of these drugs and the incidence of AP, and the potential impact on AP severity and recurrence.
All patients with incident AP between 2003 and 2012, in a well-defined area, were retrospectively identified. Data regarding AP etiology, severity, and recurrence and use of AP-associated drugs were extracted from medical records. Drugs were classified according to an evidence-based classification system. Annual drug sales data were obtained from the Swedish drug administration service.
Overall, 1457 cases of incident AP were identified. Acute pancreatitis-associated drug users increased from 32% in 2003 to 51% in 2012, reflecting increasing user rates in the general population. The incidence of AP increased during the study period but was not related to AP-associated drug user rates (P > 0.05). Recurrent AP occurred in 23% but was unrelated to AP-associated drug use (P > 0.05). In logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for comorbidity, AP-associated drug use was not related to AP severity (P > 0.05).
Use of AP-associated drugs is increasingly frequent in patients with AP. However, it does not have any major impact on the observed epidemiological changes in occurrence, severity, or recurrence of AP.
PubMed ID
26335010 View in PubMed
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Drug-related deaths in a university central hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188102
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Oct;58(7):479-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
L. Juntti-Patinen
P J Neuvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 340, 00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Oct;58(7):479-82
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medication Errors - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Abstract
The objectives were to determine the incidence of drug-related deaths in a university hospital and to find out which drugs are most commonly involved in these cases.
The files of 1511 death cases (97.7% of all death cases in the Helsinki University Central Hospital during the year 2000) were scrutinised. In the cases of suspected drug-related deaths excluding suicides, the medication, its duration and indications, the route of drug administration, and the type of the adverse reactions were determined. The probability of a fatal adverse drug reaction was classified according to WHO's classification. In addition, the incidence of drug-related deaths was calculated from the death certificates.
Scrutiny of the patients' files showed that 75 of the death cases (5.0% of all deaths) were certainly or probably drug-related. This corresponds to about 0.05% of all hospital admissions. The most common adverse reactions were neutropenia caused by antineoplastic agents and gastrointestinal or intracranial haemorrhage due to anticoagulants or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The incidence of drug-related deaths is only 0.5% when based on the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in death certificates.
Adverse drug reaction is a significant cause of death. Most of the deaths occurred in seriously ill patients with high-risk medication and they are seldom preventable. Incidence figures based on death certificates only may seriously underestimate the true incidence of fatal adverse reactions.
PubMed ID
12389071 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and differences in medication use among older people according to ATC categories and urban-rural residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116344
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig A Arnadottir
Elin Dianna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Akureyri, Solborg, Nordurslod, Akureyri, Iceland. arun@unak.is
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Male
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Polypharmacy
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study how selected indicators of socioeconomic status and urban-rural residency associate with medication use in form of number of daily medications, polypharmacy, and medication use according to Anatomic Therapeutic Classification (ATC) system.
Cross-sectional, population-based study among older community-dwelling Icelanders. Criteria for participation were: age =65 years, community-dwelling, and able to communicate verbally and to set up a time for a face-to-face interview. Information on medication use was obtained by interviews and by examining each person's medication record. Medications were categorised according to ATC system. A questionnaire and the physical and mental health summary scales of SF-36 Health Survey were used to assess potential influential factors associated with medication use.
On average, participants (n=186) used 3.9 medications, and the prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. No indicators of socioeconomic status had significant association to any aspects of medication use. Compared to urban residents, rural residents had more diagnosed diseases, were less likely to live alone, were less likely to report having adequate income, and had fewer years of education. Controlling for these differences, urban people were more likely to use medication from the B and C categories. Moreover, older urban men, with worse physical health, and greater number of diagnosed diseases used more medications from the B category.
There are unexplained regional differences in medications use, from categories B and C, by older Icelanders. Further studies are needed on why urban residents used equal number of medications, or even more medications, compared to rural residents, despite better socioeconomic status and fewer diagnosed diseases.
PubMed ID
23406652 View in PubMed
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