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Acute Pancreatitis and Use of Pancreatitis-Associated Drugs: A 10-Year Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273714
Source
Pancreas. 2015 Oct;44(7):1096-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sara Bertilsson
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Source
Pancreas. 2015 Oct;44(7):1096-104
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the use of acute pancreatitis (AP)-associated drugs in patients with AP, the relation between sales of these drugs and the incidence of AP, and the potential impact on AP severity and recurrence.
All patients with incident AP between 2003 and 2012, in a well-defined area, were retrospectively identified. Data regarding AP etiology, severity, and recurrence and use of AP-associated drugs were extracted from medical records. Drugs were classified according to an evidence-based classification system. Annual drug sales data were obtained from the Swedish drug administration service.
Overall, 1457 cases of incident AP were identified. Acute pancreatitis-associated drug users increased from 32% in 2003 to 51% in 2012, reflecting increasing user rates in the general population. The incidence of AP increased during the study period but was not related to AP-associated drug user rates (P > 0.05). Recurrent AP occurred in 23% but was unrelated to AP-associated drug use (P > 0.05). In logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for comorbidity, AP-associated drug use was not related to AP severity (P > 0.05).
Use of AP-associated drugs is increasingly frequent in patients with AP. However, it does not have any major impact on the observed epidemiological changes in occurrence, severity, or recurrence of AP.
PubMed ID
26335010 View in PubMed
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Assessing prescription medications for priority regulatory review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174776
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2005 Jun;42(1):70-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Nigel S B Rawson
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Care Policy and Evaluation, Eden Prairie, MN, USA. nigel.s.rawson@gsk.com
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2005 Jun;42(1):70-6
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug Approval - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Drug Evaluation - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - standards
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification - standards
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
Poor concordance exists between medications that receive a priority review in Canada and those given an expeditious review in the United States. The objectives of this study were to obtain an evaluation of the clinical significance of new drugs approved in both countries from expert clinical pharmacologists, and to examine the concordance of their aggregate assessment with whether or not the product received an expeditious review in either country. Five experts assessed 146 new medications approved in both Canada and the United States between 1996 and early 2002. Overall, the concordance between the experts' assessments was poor and there was large variation in products considered to be of sufficient importance for priority status. Nevertheless, the experts' evaluations suggested that several priority-reviewed products did not warrant such a review. Regulatory agencies select new medications of potential clinical significance to receive shorter review times to minimize the delay in access to them, but, in Canada, only a low proportion of priority-status products had review times within Health Canada's performance target. The large variation in the assessment of clinical significance suggests that a more appropriate strategy in Canada is to devote sufficient resources to reviewing all medications in a timely manner.
PubMed ID
15896445 View in PubMed
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Classification of drugs for teratogenic risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216566
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1995;48(3-4):177-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Classification of drugs with different risk profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272520
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Aug;62(8):A5118
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Eva Aggerholm Saedder
Birgitte Brock
Lars Peter Nielsen
Dorthe Krogsgaard Bonnerup
Marianne Lisby
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Aug;62(8):A5118
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consensus
Delphi Technique
Denmark
Drug Incompatibility
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - classification
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
A risk stratification approach is needed to identify patients at high risk of medication errors and a resulting high need of medication review. The aim of this study was to perform risk stratification (distinguishing between low-risk, medium-risk and high-risk drugs) for drugs found to cause serious adverse reactions due to medication errors. The study employed a modified Delphi technique.
Drugs from a systematic literature search were included into two rounds of a Delphi process. A panel of experts was asked to evaluate each identified drug's potential for harm and for clinically relevant drug-drug interactions on a scale from 1 (low risk) to 9 (high risk).
A total of 36 experts were appointed to serve on the panel. Consensus was reached for 29/57 (51%) drugs or drug classes that cause harm, and for 32/57 (56%) of the drugs or drug classes that cause interactions. For the remaining drugs, a decision was made based on the median score. Two lists, one stating the drugs' potential for causing harm and the other stating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions, were stratified into low-risk, medium-risk and high-risk drugs.
Based on a modified Delphi technique, we created two lists of drugs stratified into a low-risk, a medium-risk and a high-risk group of clinically relevant interactions or risk of harm to patients. The lists could be incorporated into a risk-scoring tool that stratifies the performance of medication reviews according to patients' risk of experiencing adverse reactions.
none.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
26239589 View in PubMed
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Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions among elderly people with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296857
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Oct; 74(10):1351-1360
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Eva Sönnerstam
Maria Sjölander
Hugo Lövheim
Maria Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Pharmacology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. eva.sonnerstam@umu.se.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Oct; 74(10):1351-1360
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Dementia - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Interactions
Drug Therapy, Combination - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Medication Therapy Management - standards
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Prevalence
Quality Improvement
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Increased numbers of drugs and changes in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters among elderly people contribute to increased prevalence of adverse drug reactions. Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an important reason for admission to hospital and elderly people with dementia are particularly vulnerable. The aims of the present study were to assess the occurrence and characteristics of clinically relevant DDIs and to investigate potential risk factors associated with DDIs among elderly people with dementia.
People =?65 years with dementia, admitted to two hospitals in Northern Sweden, were included. The medical records of 458 patients were reviewed. Clinically relevant DDIs were identified using the Janusmed interactions database. Pharmacological classification was conducted using Stockley's classification system.
A total of 401 DDIs were identified among 43.2% of the study population, of which 98.5% had interactions that may require dose adjustment and 7.6% had drug combinations that should be avoided. Pharmacodynamic interactions were most common, of which furosemide-citalopram (n?=?35) were most frequently observed. Omeprazol-citalopram (n?=?25) was the most common drug combination among pharmacokinetic interactions. Citalopram and warfarin were the most commonly involved drug substances. An association was found between a higher number of medications being prescribed and having at least one DDI.
Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are prevalent among elderly people with dementia living in Northern Sweden. Drug-drug interactions should be identified in order to manage and prevent adverse outcomes. This is particularly important among this group of people especially when multiple medications are being prescribed.
PubMed ID
29967921 View in PubMed
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Coding of drugs used by respondents of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189046
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2002;9(2):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
W. Walop
M. Semenchuk
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health Branch, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Ottawa, Canada. wikke_walop@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2002;9(2):64-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Canada
Databases, Factual
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Questionnaires
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging collected verbatim data on the use of medications (drugs) and health products.
To describe how the names of drugs and health products are coded and how they can be summarized.
The data were entered manually into a database. After comparing three coding systems, the drugs and health products were coded using a modification of the American Hospital Formulary Code as temporary codes and the Anatomical, Therapeutic, Chemical Classification as the final codes.
Coding and input of verbatim drug data are time-consuming, particularly when done manually. Once the coding scheme is in place, the advances in technological aspects of data management greatly improve the process.
PubMed ID
12172585 View in PubMed
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[Coding practice in fatal poisonings].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141139
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Aug 26;130(16):1601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2010
Author
Berit Muan
Fridtjof Heyerdahl
Roald Lindås
Anders Prestmo
Helge Skjønsberg
Knut Joachim Berg
Author Affiliation
Avdeling giftinformasjon, Helsedirektoratet, Postboks 7000 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway. berit.muan@helsedir.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Aug 26;130(16):1601-5
Date
Aug-26-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Drug Overdose - classification - diagnosis - mortality
Hospital Mortality
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Poisoning - classification - diagnosis - mortality
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Suicide - classification
Abstract
Each year, nearly 100 deaths and more than 10,000 admissions to Norwegian hospitals can be attributed to acute poisoning from non-medical substances and drugs in supra-therapeutic doses. The aim of this study was to evaluate hospitals' routines for coding of acute poisoning deaths and to provide information on the toxic agents involved.
Medical records of deaths (at 6 Norwegian hospitals in the period 1.1.1999 -31.12.2005) due to acute poisoning were re-examined to assess accuracy of diagnosis codes.
Acute poisoning was registered as the cause of 225 deaths in the study period. The re-evaluation concluded that 45 of these deaths had other causes. In 125 of the remaining 180 deaths, acute poisoning was only registered as a side diagnosis, although re-examination revealed it was the major contribution to death in 66 % (83 of 125) of cases. The hospitals had classified the drugs according to ATC codes in 16 % (28 of 180) of patients with acute poisoning.
The present Norwegian coding practice does not document acute poisoning deaths in hospital correctly, and registry studies based on diagnosis codes should be interpreted with care. Current registration of poisoning agents' ATC-codes is insufficient and the Norwegian version of ICD-10 alone is not suitable for classification of acute drug poisoning. Replacement of the Norwegian ICD-10 version by the original international version should be considered and/or the routines for registration of ATC-codes should be improved.
PubMed ID
20805856 View in PubMed
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Differentiating drugs by harm potential: the rational versus the feasible.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203024
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 1999 Jan;34(1):25-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H. Kalant
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 1999 Jan;34(1):25-34
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug Costs
Drug Utilization
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification - economics
Public Health
Abstract
In an ideal harm reduction model, drugs would be ranked according to their potential to cause harm, with varying implications for control policies and interventions. In such a public health oriented approach, the maximum protection of the public from harm would be balanced with the least possible restriction of freedom. In reality, however, the accuracy and completeness of the necessary information for such a ranking is highly limited. Many other factors not readily incorporated in a rational model, such as values, beliefs, and traditions, also affect drug policy decisions. Thus, rather than relying on acquisition of the necessary knowledge, it may be preferable to focus efforts on developing effective nonlegal measures to reduce drug use and harm. [Translations are provided in the International Abstracts Section of this issue.]
PubMed ID
10052388 View in PubMed
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Drug reimbursement in Finland-a case of explicit prioritizing in special categories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183077
Source
Health Policy. 2003 Nov;66(2):169-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Lauri Vuorenkoski
Hanna Toiviainen
Elina Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES, P.O. Box 220, FIN-00531 Helsinki, Finland. lauri.vuorenkoski@stakes.fi
Source
Health Policy. 2003 Nov;66(2):169-77
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Organizational
Finland
Formularies as Topic
Health Priorities - classification - economics
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Investments
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification - economics
Policy Making
Public Health Administration
Rate Setting and Review
Abstract
Increased drug expenses have created challenges for drug reimbursement systems in many industrialised countries, including Finland. Prioritization of drugs could be one solution to this problem. This paper examines stakeholders' perspectives on the prioritization decisions made in the Finnish drug reimbursement system, particularly concerning drugs in the higher reimbursement categories. The analysis was based on 18 interviews with key stakeholders. The results revealed that authorities directly influencing the decisions tried to keep them as technical and non-political as possible. However, doing so was not easy, and there appeared to be hidden non-technical rationales behind many decisions. Stakeholders outside public administration had few opportunities to openly participate in decision-making because of the lack of transparency of the process. Despite this, they tried to influence decisions concerning their interests by using several means, such as lobbying the media, Parliament or other stakeholders. Transparent decision-making and better methods of open discussion on competing interests could promote democracy in the prioritization of drugs and perhaps reduce the harmful effects of indirect and unequal participation by different stakeholders.
PubMed ID
14585516 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.