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[900 tons of drugs are returned to pharmacies annually. A questionnaire study on unused drugs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180861
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Mar 4;101(10):898-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2004
Author
Kerstin Hulter Asberg
Author Affiliation
Medicinskt centrum, Lasarettet i Enköping. kerstin.hulter.asberg@lul.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Mar 4;101(10):898-900
Date
Mar-4-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - economics
Pharmacies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Refusal
PubMed ID
15055052 View in PubMed
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Abramson: direct-to-consumer advertising will erode health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157621
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1126-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-2008
Author
Ann Silversides
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1126-7
Date
Apr-22-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic
Canada
Drug Industry
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
PubMed ID
18427081 View in PubMed
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Access to new drugs for dialysis patients: challenges for indigenous and non-indigenous populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139778
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2010 Nov;74 Suppl 1:S138-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
D C Mendelssohn
Author Affiliation
Humber River Regional Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. dmendelssohn@hrrh.on.ca
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2010 Nov;74 Suppl 1:S138-41
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Drug Evaluation - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - drug therapy
Medical Indigency
Patient Advocacy
Pharmaceutical Preparations - economics - supply & distribution
Renal Dialysis
Abstract
Most dialysis patients are on 5 - 10 medications. The costs of these medications vary widely, ranging from pennies per day for water soluble multivitamins, to several thousand dollars per year for erythropoietin-stimulating agents. In Canada, public funding for drug therapies is undertaken by each province, with wide variability in coverage and on restriction criteria for expensive new drugs. For native Canadians and Inuit, access to drugs is superior to that of other Canadians through a federal program. The Canadian system for drug evaluation, where strict evidence-based medicine (EBM) and comparative effectiveness research (CER) is applied, is instructive and may provide clues to the future from an international perspective. Given the unique challenges in nephrology, it is predicted that access to new drugs and other therapies will be restricted by these evaluation methods. Indeed, it seems desirable for nephrology organizations to respond to this new threat in a pragmatic and balanced way. Part of that response might be a call for exceptional status for dialysis, with adjusted criteria of EBM and CER that would be more suitable, and stimulate innovation and research in nephrology.
PubMed ID
20979980 View in PubMed
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Acetaminophen, some other drugs, some diseases and the risk of transitional cell carcinoma. A population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15935
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Steineck
B E Wiholm
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Age Factors
Analgesics - adverse effects
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - adverse effects
Aspirin - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrofurantoin - adverse effects
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetracyclines
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Urologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk of transitional cell carcinoma among subjects with an intake of acetaminophen, aspirin, some other drugs and with some intercurrent diseases. The source person-time ('study base') included subjects living in Stockholm in 1985-1987. The study included 325 subjects with a transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract and 393 controls randomly selected from the source person-time. Data were obtained by a postal questionnaire supplemented by a telephone interview. A relative risk (with a 95% confidence interval) of 1.6 (1.1-2.3) was obtained after an intake of acetaminophen, adjusted for age, aspirin, gender and smoking. Conversely, a 30% decrease in risk was obtained after an intake of aspirin. No details in the exposure substantiated the finding for acetaminophen. The inherent validity problems of observational studies, and the weak evidence in this and previous studies of the association between acetaminophen and transitional cell carcinoma, makes available epidemiological evidence insufficient to regulate the use of this commonly ingested analgesic. Increased risks were, in addition, found for tetracyclines, nitrofurantoin and a history of allergic asthma and a decreased risk found for rheumatic symptoms. The findings stress the nonepidemiological data concerning the potential carcinogenicity of acetaminophen and may be a foundation for future research of some other drugs and diseases.
PubMed ID
7576740 View in PubMed
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Acute Pancreatitis and Use of Pancreatitis-Associated Drugs: A 10-Year Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273714
Source
Pancreas. 2015 Oct;44(7):1096-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sara Bertilsson
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Source
Pancreas. 2015 Oct;44(7):1096-104
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the use of acute pancreatitis (AP)-associated drugs in patients with AP, the relation between sales of these drugs and the incidence of AP, and the potential impact on AP severity and recurrence.
All patients with incident AP between 2003 and 2012, in a well-defined area, were retrospectively identified. Data regarding AP etiology, severity, and recurrence and use of AP-associated drugs were extracted from medical records. Drugs were classified according to an evidence-based classification system. Annual drug sales data were obtained from the Swedish drug administration service.
Overall, 1457 cases of incident AP were identified. Acute pancreatitis-associated drug users increased from 32% in 2003 to 51% in 2012, reflecting increasing user rates in the general population. The incidence of AP increased during the study period but was not related to AP-associated drug user rates (P > 0.05). Recurrent AP occurred in 23% but was unrelated to AP-associated drug use (P > 0.05). In logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for comorbidity, AP-associated drug use was not related to AP severity (P > 0.05).
Use of AP-associated drugs is increasingly frequent in patients with AP. However, it does not have any major impact on the observed epidemiological changes in occurrence, severity, or recurrence of AP.
PubMed ID
26335010 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' struggles with swallowing tablets: barriers, strategies and learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162814
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2008 Jan;30(1):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Dana Lee Hansen
Ditte Tulinius
Ebba Holme Hansen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, FKL-Research Centre for Quality in Medicine Use, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, Copenhagen DK-2100, Denmark. dlh@farma.ku.dk
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2008 Jan;30(1):65-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Deglutition
Denmark
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Qualitative Research
Tablets - administration & dosage
Abstract
To explore adolescents' struggles with taking oral medications.
Copenhagen, Denmark.
Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 89 adolescents (33 boys, 56 girls) between the ages of 11 and 20. Adolescents were recruited through four public schools. To identify struggles with taking oral medication, interview transcripts were systematically searched for statements including the terms swallow, chew, crush and eat. Thematic analysis of the identified statements was carried out to reveal dominant themes in the adolescents' accounts.
Over one-third of the adolescents spontaneously provided accounts of the difficulties they experienced with taking oral medications, especially with swallowing tablets. Three themes were dominant in their narratives: barriers, strategies and learning. Barriers experienced by the adolescents involved the medications' properties, e.g. taste. Adolescents developed strategies to overcome these barriers, e.g. crushing tablets. Via a process of learning-by-doing and the acquisition of increased experience and autonomy, many adolescents mastered the skill of swallowing tablets.
Many adolescents experienced barriers in their attempts to swallow tablets. They developed various strategies to overcome these barriers and gradually mastered taking medicines in a learning-by-doing process.
PubMed ID
17594531 View in PubMed
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Advances in pharmacological strategies for the prevention of cataract development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151401
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2009 May-Jun;57(3):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
S K Gupta
V Kalai Selvan
S S Agrawal
Rohit Saxena
Author Affiliation
Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Sector 3, Pushp Vihar, New Delhi-110 017, India. skgup@hotmail.com
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2009 May-Jun;57(3):175-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aldehyde Reductase - antagonists & inhibitors
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Cataract - etiology - prevention & control
Glutathione - administration & dosage
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Risk factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Cataractous-opacification of the lens is one of the leading causes of blindness in India. The situation can be managed by surgical removal of the cataractous lens. Various pharmacological strategies have been proposed for the prevention and treatment of cataract. Information on possible benefits of putative anticataract agents comes from a variety of approaches, ranging from laboratory experiments, both in vitro and in vivo , to epidemiological studies in patients. This review deals with the various mechanisms, and possible pharmacological interventions for the prevention of cataract. The article also reviews research on potential anticataractous agents, including aldose reductase inhibitors, glutathione boosters, antiglycating agents, vitamins and various drugs from indigenous sources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19384010 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug events in children during hospitalization and after discharge in a Norwegian university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19260
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(1):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I. Buajordet
F. Wesenberg
O. Brørs
A. Langslet
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingebjorg.buajordet@legemiddelverket.no
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(1):88-94
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Drug Interactions
Drug Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The frequency and characteristics of adverse drug events (ADEs) in children hospitalized in the paediatric department of Ullevaal University Hospital, Norway, were determined using intensive monitoring. Of 579 children treated with drugs, 28% experienced ADEs; 7% at the time of admission, 18% during hospitalization and 9% after discharge. All children treated for cancer, 19% treated with anti-infective drugs, 15% treated with antiasthmatics and 10% treated with drugs affecting the nervous system experienced ADEs. The most frequent events were gastrointestinal, CNS- and skin reactions and 19% were considered as serious. ADEs caused 6% of the admissions and 44% required interventions. Most ADEs were found by screening patient records, where physicians mostly described adverse drug events requiring interventions and nurses described less serious events. Parents reported 14% of the events, of which a majority were CNS reactions. CNS reactions may be more common than expected and observations by parents are important when investigating such reactions in children. Conclusions: ADEs, mainly gastrointestinal, CNS and skin reactions related to drugs affecting the nervous system, anti-infectives and antiasthmatics, were seen in 28% of the patients. The reporting of events by parents was a useful supplement to the screening of patient records.
PubMed ID
11883826 View in PubMed
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501 records – page 1 of 51.