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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute oil exposure reduces physiological process rates in Arctic phyto- and zooplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300168
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2019 Jan; 28(1):26-36
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Signe Lemcke
Johnna Holding
Eva Friis Møller
Jakob Thyrring
Kim Gustavson
Thomas Juul-Pedersen
Mikael K Sejr
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. signelemcke@gmail.com.
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2019 Jan; 28(1):26-36
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Copepoda - drug effects - physiology
Feces - chemistry
Food chain
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Photosynthesis - drug effects
Phytoplankton - drug effects - physiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Zooplankton - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Arctic shipping and oil exploration are expected to increase, as sea ice extent is reduced. This enhances the risk for accidental oil spills throughout the Arctic, which emphasises the need to quantify potential consequences to the marine ecosystem and to evaluate risk and choose appropriate remediation methods. This study investigated the sensitivity of Arctic marine plankton to the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of heavy fuel oil. Arctic marine phytoplankton and copepods (Calanus finmarchicus) were exposed to three WAF concentrations corresponding to total hydrocarbon contents of 0.07?mg?l-1, 0.28?mg?l-1 and 0.55?mg?l-1. Additionally, the potential phototoxic effects of exposing the WAF to sunlight, including the UV spectrum, were tested. The study determined sub-lethal effects of WAF exposure on rates of key ecosystem processes: primary production of phytoplankton and grazing (faecal pellet production) of copepods. Both phytoplankton and copepods responded negatively to WAF exposure. Biomass specific primary production was reduced by 6, 52 and 73% and faecal pellet production by 18, 51 and 86% with increasing WAF concentrations compared to controls. The phototoxic effect reduced primary production in the two highest WAF concentration treatments by 71 and 91%, respectively. This experiment contributes to the limited knowledge of acute sub-lethal effects of potential oil spills to the Arctic pelagic food web.
PubMed ID
30460435 View in PubMed
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[Association of polymorph variants of CYP1A2 and CYP1A1 genes with reproductive and thyroid diseases in female workers of petrochemical industry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122008
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(5):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
A R Irmiakova
O V Kochetova
M K Gainullina
O V Sivochalova
T V Viktorova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(5):41-8
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chemical Industry
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 - genetics
Female
Fibrocystic Breast Disease - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Homozygote
Humans
Leiomyoma - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Health
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Polymorphism, Genetic
Regression Analysis
Russia
Thyroid Diseases - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Abstract
The article presents results obtained in study of relationship between polymorph variants of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 genes with reproductive and thyroid diseases risk in female workers of petrochemical industry, when compared with reference group females. Variants TD and DD of CYP1A2 gene appeared to be associated with nodes formation in uterus and breast in female workers and reference group females. Following liability markers are obtained: homozygous in rare allele genotype CC of CYP1A1 gene for reproductive and thyroid diseaes (fibrous cystic mastopathy and nodular goitre), heterozygous genotype AG of CYP1A1 gene in uterine myoma and fibrous cystic mastopathy, homozygous in deleted T genotype of CYP1A2 gene in autoimmune thyroiditis. Occupational hazards and long length of service at hazardous industries increase effects of rare alleles of the genes studied.
PubMed ID
22855999 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada's oil sands residents complain of health effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104386
Source
Lancet. 2014 Apr 26;383(9927):1450-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2014

Combined effects of fishing and oil spills on marine fish: Role of stock demographic structure for offspring overlap with oil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294288
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(1):336-342
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Leif Chr Stige
Geir Ottersen
Natalia A Yaragina
Frode B Vikebø
Nils Chr Stenseth
Øystein Langangen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: l.c.stige@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(1):336-342
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Computer simulation
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fisheries
Gadus morhua - growth & development
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Population Dynamics
Reproduction
Abstract
It has been proposed that the multiple pressures of fishing and petroleum activities impact fish stocks in synergy, as fishing-induced demographic changes in a stock may lead to increased sensitivity to detrimental effects of acute oil spills. High fishing pressure may erode the demographic structure of fish stocks, lead to less diverse spawning strategies, and more concentrated distributions of offspring in space and time. Hence an oil spill may potentially hit a larger fraction of a year-class of offspring. Such a link between demographic structure and egg distribution was recently demonstrated for the Northeast Arctic stock of Atlantic cod for years 1959-1993. We here estimate that this variation translates into a two-fold variation in the maximal proportion of cod eggs potentially exposed to a large oil spill. With this information it is possible to quantitatively account for demographic structure in prospective studies of population effects of possible oil spills.
PubMed ID
29680556 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Complex study of the mutagenic effect of soil pollutions with petrochemical products in the Chechen Republic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128608
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Sep-Oct;(5):50-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M-Kh Soltaeva
P M Dzhambetova
S K Abilev
L P Sycheva
L E Sal'nikova
A V Rubanovich
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Sep-Oct;(5):50-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Chromosome Aberrations - chemically induced - statistics & numerical data
Cytogenetic Analysis
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Epithelial Cells - drug effects - pathology
Female
Humans
Lymphocytes - drug effects - pathology
Male
Metabolic Detoxication, Drug - genetics
Mouth Mucosa - drug effects - pathology
Mutagenicity Tests
Mutagens - analysis - toxicity
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - toxicity
Russia
Soil - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Xenobiotics - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Abstract
A study to evaluate congenital morphogenetic variants (CMGVs) and the association of the polymorphism of the xenobiotic detoxification and repair genes with cytogenetic parameters was conducted for the first time in children living in different climatic zones and areas polluted with primary petroleum refining products. Analysis of CMGVs and cytogenetic parameters in children points to the total genotoxic impact of oil pollutions. The children's higher sensitivity to environmental pollution is associated with the polymorphism of the detoxification gene, with the base excision repair gene XRCC1 in particular.
PubMed ID
22185004 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developmental toxicity in flounder embryos exposed to crude oils derived from different geographical regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284891
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Jun;196:19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Jee-Hyun Jung
Eun-Hee Lee
Kwang-Min Choi
Un Hyuk Yim
Sung Yong Ha
Joon Geon An
Moonkoo Kim
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Jun;196:19-26
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Fins - abnormalities - drug effects - embryology
Animals
Aquaculture
Australia
Cytochrome P450 Family 1 - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Fish Proteins - agonists - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics - metabolism
Flounder - abnormalities - embryology - metabolism
Fuel Oils - analysis - toxicity
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental - drug effects
Heart - drug effects - embryology
Homeobox Protein Nkx-2.5 - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics - metabolism
Iraq
Morphogenesis - drug effects
Naphthalenes - analysis - toxicity
Petroleum - analysis - toxicity
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis - toxicity
Russia
Teratogens - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Toxicity Tests
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Abstract
Crude oils from distinct geographical regions have distinct chemical compositions, and, as a result, their toxicity may be different. However, developmental toxicity of crude oils derived from different geographical regions has not been extensively characterized. In this study, flounder embryos were separately exposed to effluents contaminated by three crude oils including: Basrah Light (BLO), Pyrenees (PCO), and Sakhalin Vityaz (SVO), in addition to a processed fuel oil (MFO-380), to measure developmental toxicity and for gene expressions. Each oil possessed a distinct chemical composition. Edema defect was highest in embryos exposed to PCO and MFO-380 that both have a greater fraction of three-ring PAHs (33% and 22%, respectively) compared to BLO and SVO. Observed caudal fin defects were higher in embryos exposed to SVO and MFO-380, which are both dominated by naphthalenes (81% and 52%, respectively). CYP1A gene expressions were also highest in embryos exposed to SVO and MFO-380. Higher incidence of cardiotoxicity and lower nkx 2.5 expression were detected in embryos exposed to PCO. Unique gene expression profiles were observed in embryos exposed to crude oils with distinct compositions. This study demonstrates that crude oils of different geographical origins with different compositional characteristics induce developmental toxicity to different degrees.
PubMed ID
28274761 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of seawater desalination and oil pollution on the lipid composition of blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264874
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2014 Dec;110:103-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
N N Fokina
I N Bakhmet
G A Shklyarevich
N N Nemova
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2014 Dec;110:103-9
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Gills - drug effects - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Mytilus edulis - drug effects - metabolism
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Russia
Salinity
Seawater - adverse effects
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
A study on the effect oil pollution under normal and reduced salinity had on blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea in an aquarium-based experiment and in the natural habitat revealed a change in gill total lipids as a compensatory response. The cholesterol concentration and the cholesterol/phospholipids ratio in gills were found to reflect the impact of the environmental factors (oil pollution and desalination), and evidence adaptive changes in the cell membrane structure. An elevated content of storage lipids (chiefly triacylglycerols) in the mussels in the aquarium experiment indicates, first of all, the uptake and accumulation of oil products in gill cells under both normal and reduced seawater salinity, while high triacylglycerols level in gill littoral mussels from 'control' biotope in the Gulf of Kandalaksha is primarily associated with the mussel?s pre-spawning period.
PubMed ID
25212488 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of oil spill response technologies on the physiological performance of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292189
Source
Aquat Toxicol. 2018 Jun; 199:65-76
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Kirstine Toxværd
Marina Pancic
Helene O Eide
Janne E Søreide
Camille Lacroix
Stéphane Le Floch
Morten Hjorth
Torkel Gissel Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Cowi Denmark, Department of Water & Nature, Parallelvej 2, 2800, Kgs Lyngby, Denmark; National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet Building 201, 2800, Kgs Lyngby, Denmark. Electronic address: kuto@cowi.dk.
Source
Aquat Toxicol. 2018 Jun; 199:65-76
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Body Size - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Copepoda - drug effects - growth & development - physiology
Female
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Larva - drug effects - physiology
Ovum - drug effects - growth & development
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis - toxicity
Seawater - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
A mesocosm study with oil in ice was performed in Van Mijenfjorden in Svalbard to compare effects of the oil spill responses (OSR) in situ burning, chemical dispersion and natural attenuation on the physiological performance of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis. Seawater collected from the mesocosms in winter and spring was used in laboratory incubation experiments, where effects on fecal pellet production, egg production and hatching success were investigated over a period of 14?days. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) seawater concentrations were lowest in winter. Brine channel formation in spring resulted in an 18 times increase in PAH concentration in the chemical dispersion treatment (1.67?µg?L-1), and a 3 fold increase in the natural attenuation (0.36?µg?L-1) and in situ burning (0.04?µg?L-1) treatments. The physiological performance of female C. glacialis was unaffected by the PAH seawater concentrations. However, a higher mortality and deformity of nauplii was observed in the chemical dispersion treatment, highlighting the importance of considering secondary effects on next generation in future environmental risk assessment of OSR. This study shows that during the ice-covered period, chemical dispersion of oil spills leads to higher PAH exposure than natural attenuation and in situ burning, with potential consequences for recruitment of Arctic copepods.
PubMed ID
29614482 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimating the acute impacts of Arctic marine oil spills using expert elicitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296977
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jun; 131(Pt A):782-792
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Maisa Nevalainen
Inari Helle
Jarno Vanhatalo
Author Affiliation
Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Finland. Electronic address: maisa.nevalainen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jun; 131(Pt A):782-792
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms
Arctic Regions
Birds
Ecotoxicology - methods
Environment
Invertebrates
Petroleum - toxicity
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Probability
Risk assessment
Seals, Earless
Seasons
Whales
Abstract
Increasing maritime traffic in the Arctic has heightened the oil spill-related risks in this highly sensitive environment. To quantitatively assess these risks, we need knowledge about both the vulnerability and sensitivity of the key Arctic functional groups that may be affected by spilled oil. However, in the Arctic these data are typically scarce or lacking altogether. To compensate for this limited data availability, we propose the use of a probabilistic expert elicitation methodology, which we apply to seals, anatids, and seabirds. Our results suggest that the impacts of oil vary between functional groups, seasons, and oil types. Overall, the impacts are least for seals and greatest for anatids. Offspring seem to be more sensitive than adults, the impact is greatest in spring, and medium and heavy oils are the most harmful oil types. The elicitation process worked well, yet finding enough skilled and motivated experts proved to be difficult.
PubMed ID
29887006 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.