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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute oil exposure reduces physiological process rates in Arctic phyto- and zooplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300168
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2019 Jan; 28(1):26-36
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Signe Lemcke
Johnna Holding
Eva Friis Møller
Jakob Thyrring
Kim Gustavson
Thomas Juul-Pedersen
Mikael K Sejr
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. signelemcke@gmail.com.
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2019 Jan; 28(1):26-36
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Copepoda - drug effects - physiology
Feces - chemistry
Food chain
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Photosynthesis - drug effects
Phytoplankton - drug effects - physiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Zooplankton - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Arctic shipping and oil exploration are expected to increase, as sea ice extent is reduced. This enhances the risk for accidental oil spills throughout the Arctic, which emphasises the need to quantify potential consequences to the marine ecosystem and to evaluate risk and choose appropriate remediation methods. This study investigated the sensitivity of Arctic marine plankton to the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of heavy fuel oil. Arctic marine phytoplankton and copepods (Calanus finmarchicus) were exposed to three WAF concentrations corresponding to total hydrocarbon contents of 0.07?mg?l-1, 0.28?mg?l-1 and 0.55?mg?l-1. Additionally, the potential phototoxic effects of exposing the WAF to sunlight, including the UV spectrum, were tested. The study determined sub-lethal effects of WAF exposure on rates of key ecosystem processes: primary production of phytoplankton and grazing (faecal pellet production) of copepods. Both phytoplankton and copepods responded negatively to WAF exposure. Biomass specific primary production was reduced by 6, 52 and 73% and faecal pellet production by 18, 51 and 86% with increasing WAF concentrations compared to controls. The phototoxic effect reduced primary production in the two highest WAF concentration treatments by 71 and 91%, respectively. This experiment contributes to the limited knowledge of acute sub-lethal effects of potential oil spills to the Arctic pelagic food web.
PubMed ID
30460435 View in PubMed
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Adhesion of mechanically and chemically dispersed crude oil droplets to eggs of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299352
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Nov 01; 640-641:138-143
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2018
Author
Bjørn Henrik Hansen
Lisbet Sørensen
Patricia Almeira Carvalho
Sonnich Meier
Andy M Booth
Dag Altin
Julia Farkas
Trond Nordtug
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Ocean AS, Environment and New Resources, Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: bjorn.h.hansen@sintef.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Nov 01; 640-641:138-143
Date
Nov-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Gadiformes - physiology
Gadus morhua - physiology
Ovum - chemistry
Petroleum - analysis
Petroleum Pollution
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Crude oil accidentally spilled into the marine environment undergoes natural weathering processes that result in oil components being dissolved into the water column or present in particulate form as dispersed oil droplets. Oil components dissolved in seawater are typically considered as more bioavailable to pelagic marine organisms and the main driver of crude oil toxicity, however, recent studies indicate that oil droplets may also contribute. The adhesion of crude oil droplets onto the eggs of pelagic fish species may cause enhanced transfer of oil components via the egg surface causing toxicity during the sensitive embryonic developmental stage. In the current study, we utilized an oil droplet dispersion generator to generate defined oil droplets sizes/concentrations and exposed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) to investigate if the potential for dispersed oil droplets to adhere onto the surface of eggs was species-dependent. The influence of a commercial chemical dispersant on the adhesion process was also studied. A key finding was that the adhesion of oil droplets was significantly higher for haddock than cod, highlighting key differences and exposure risks between the two species. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the differences in oil droplet adhesion may be driven by the surface morphology of the eggs. Another important finding was that the adhesion capacity of oil droplets to fish eggs is significantly reduced (cod 37.3%, haddock 41.7%) in the presence of the chemical dispersant.
PubMed ID
29859431 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alkyl bicarbamates supramolecular organogelators with effective selective gelation and high oil recovery from oil/water mixtures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280372
Source
Chemosphere. 2017 Jan;167:178-187
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Yongzhen Wang
Songquan Wu
Xingru Yan
Tao Ma
Lu Shao
Yuyan Liu
Zhanhu Guo
Source
Chemosphere. 2017 Jan;167:178-187
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbamates - chemistry
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - methods
Gels - chemistry
Oils - chemistry - isolation & purification
Petroleum Pollution
Russia
Water - chemistry
Abstract
A series of alkyl bicarbamates supramolecular organogelators were synthesized with different structures and lengths of alkyl chains. The driving forces for the self-assembly of small molecules, including the intermolecular H bonding, p-p stacking and van der Waals interactions, played an important role in the formation of different 3D network structures, i.e., fibers, ribbons, sheets, and prisms. And a probable formation process of the gel networks was proposed. Furthermore, the phase-selective gelling performances were investigated for oil removal from aqueous solution. Interestingly, the gelling properties were found to be affected by the length and structure of alkyl chains, while some gelators with intermediate alkyl chain lengths could effectively gel all the tested oils from water surface within 15 min, such as Russian crude oil, diesel, gasoline, soybean oil, peanut oil, olive oil, cyclohexane, hexane and ethyl acetate. Advantageously, fast gelation, high rate of oil removal (>95%) and excellent oil retention rate (close to 100%) were realized in the recovery of oil spills from water surface. This kind of supramolecular gelators demonstrates good potential applications in the delivery or removal of organic pollution from oil/water mixtures.
PubMed ID
27718430 View in PubMed
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An ecological risk assessment model for Arctic oil spills from a subsea pipeline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296515
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:1117-1127
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Ehsan Arzaghi
Rouzbeh Abbassi
Vikram Garaniya
Jonathan Binns
Faisal Khan
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Maritime Engineering and Hydrodynamics, Australian Maritime College (AMC), University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:1117-1127
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bayes Theorem
Ecology - methods
Models, Theoretical
Petroleum Pollution
Risk Assessment - methods
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
There is significant risk associated with increased oil and gas exploration activities in the Arctic Ocean. This paper presents a probabilistic methodology for Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) of accidental oil spills in this region. A fugacity approach is adopted to model the fate and transport of released oil, taking into account the uncertainty of input variables. This assists in predicting the 95th percentile Predicted Exposure Concentration (PEC95%) of pollutants in different media. The 5th percentile Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC5%) is obtained from toxicity data for 19 species. A model based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is developed to assess the ecological risk posed to the aquatic community. The model enables accounting for the occurrence likelihood of input parameters, as well as analyzing the time-variable risk profile caused by seasonal changes. It is observed through the results that previous probabilistic methods developed for ERA can be overestimating the risk level.
PubMed ID
30301010 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of oil spill responses for offshore oil production projects in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada: Implications for seabird conservation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282682
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Jun 15;107(1):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2016
Author
Gail S Fraser
Vincent Racine
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Jun 15;107(1):36-45
Date
Jun-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Environment
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - standards
Newfoundland and Labrador
Petroleum Pollution
Abstract
Seabirds are vulnerable to oil pollution, particularly in cold-water regions. We investigated the response of small spills (
PubMed ID
27131965 View in PubMed
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An online platform for rapid oil outflow assessment from grounded tankers for pollution response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296513
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:963-976
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Kristjan Tabri
Martin Heinvee
Janek Laanearu
Monika Kollo
Floris Goerlandt
Author Affiliation
Tallinn University of Technology, School of Engineering, Tallinn, Estonia. Electronic address: kristjan.tabri@ttu.ee.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Oct; 135:963-976
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidents
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Petroleum Pollution
Ships
Software
Abstract
The risk of oil spills is an ongoing societal concern. Whereas several decision support systems exist for predicting the fate and drift of spilled oil, there is a lack of accurate models for assessing the amount of oil spilled and its temporal evolution. In order to close this gap, this paper presents an online platform for the fast assessment of tanker grounding accidents in terms of structural damage and time-dependent amount of spilled cargo oil. The simulation platform consists of the definition of accidental scenarios; the assessment of the grounding damage and the prediction of the time-dependent oil spill size. The performance of this integrated online simulation environment is exemplified through illustrative case studies representing two plausible accidental grounding scenarios in the Gulf of Finland: one resulting in oil spill of about 50?t, while in the other the inner hull remained intact and no spill occurred.
PubMed ID
30301122 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic marine fish 'biotransformation toxicity' model for ecological risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302956
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 May; 142:408-418
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2019
Author
Faisal Fahd
Brian Veitch
Faisal Khan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Risk, Integrity and Safety Engineering (C-RISE), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL A1B 3X5, Canada.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 May; 142:408-418
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Bayes Theorem
Biotransformation
Ecotoxicology - methods
Environmental Biomarkers
Enzymes - metabolism
Gadiformes - metabolism - physiology
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Models, Theoretical
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Risk assessment
Seasons
Water Pollutants, Chemical - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Xenobiotics - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Abstract
Oil and gas exploration and marine transport in the Arctic region have put the focus on the ecological risk of the possibly exposed organisms. In the present study, the impacts of sea ice, extreme light regime, various polar region-specific physiological characteristics in polar cod (Boreogadus saida) and their effects on xenobiotic distribution and metabolism are studied. A Bayesian belief network is used to model individual fish toxicity. The enzyme activity in the fish liver and other pertinent organs is used as a proxy for cellular damage and repair and is subsequently linked to toxicity in polar cod. Seasonal baseline variation in enzyme production is also taken into consideration. The model estimates the probability of exposure concentration to cause cytotoxicity and circumvents the need to use the traditionally obtained No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC). Instead, it uses biotransformation enzyme activity as a basis to estimate the probability of individual cell damages.
PubMed ID
31232318 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing impacts of simulated oil spills on the Northeast Arctic cod fishery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293450
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jan; 126:63-73
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
JoLynn Carroll
Frode Vikebø
Daniel Howell
Ole Jacob Broch
Raymond Nepstad
Starrlight Augustine
Geir Morten Skeie
Radovan Bast
Jonas Juselius
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva, FRAM - High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment, 9296 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: jlc@akvaplan.niva.no.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jan; 126:63-73
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Environment
Fisheries
Gadiformes
Larva
Ovum
Petroleum Pollution
Reproduction
Abstract
We simulate oil spills of 1500 and 4500m3/day lasting 14, 45, and 90days in the spawning grounds of the commercial fish species, Northeast Arctic cod. Modeling the life history of individual fish eggs and larvae, we predict deviations from the historical pattern of recruitment to the adult population due to toxic oil exposures. Reductions in survival for pelagic stages of cod were 0-10%, up to a maximum of 43%. These reductions resulted in a decrease in adult cod biomass of
PubMed ID
29421135 View in PubMed
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Assessing oil spill sensitivity in unsheltered coastal environments: A case study for Lithuanian-Russian coasts, South-eastern Baltic Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276773
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Jan 15;102(1):44-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2016
Author
Daniel Depellegrin
Paulo Pereira
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Jan 15;102(1):44-57
Date
Jan-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment - analysis - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - analysis - analysis
Geographic Information Systems - analysis - analysis
Lithuania - analysis - analysis
Petroleum - analysis - analysis
Petroleum Pollution - analysis - analysis
Russia - analysis - analysis
Abstract
This study presents a series of oil spill indexes for the characterization of physical and biological sensitivity in unsheltered coastal environments. The case study extends over 237 km of Lithuanian-Russian coastal areas subjected to multiple oil spill threats. Results show that 180 km of shoreline have environmental sensitivity index (ESI) of score 3. Natural clean-up processes depending on (a) shoreline sinuosity, (b) orientation and (c) wave exposure are favourable on 72 km of shoreline. Vulnerability analysis from pre-existing Kravtsovskoye D6 platform oil spill scenarios indicates that 15.1 km of the Curonian Spit have high impact probability. The highest seafloor sensitivity within the 20 m isobath is at the Vistula Spit and Curonian Spit, whereas biological sensitivity is moderate over the entire study area. The paper concludes with the importance of harmonized datasets and methodologies for transboundary oil spill impact assessment.
PubMed ID
26705575 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.