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[Acute chemical poisoning of humans as a medico-ecological problem].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210154
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(2):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
N N Litvinov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(2):1-7
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Ecology
Environmental Pollutants - poisoning
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
International Cooperation
Pesticides - poisoning
Poison Control Centers
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
Anthropogenic acute chemical exposures have become an important socioeconomic and environmental factor on the national, regional and global level. They present an actual or potential danger to vital activity and health of large population groups and normal operation of the Biosphere and natural components. Hence a problem of prevention and elimination of acute technogenic exposures hazardous for human health has expanded beyond the medical competence and grown to a major environmental issue.
PubMed ID
9156767 View in PubMed
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Association of pesticide exposure, vaccination response, and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153968
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
M. Baranska
L. Van Amelsvoort
S. Birindelli
S. Fustinoni
E. Corsini
J. Liesivuori
H. Van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bulgaria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Immunity - drug effects - immunology
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Interleukin-1alpha - genetics
Interleukin-1beta - genetics
Italy
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Pesticides - poisoning
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk assessment
Vaccination
Abstract
We performed a cross-sectional study involving workers from four European countries in which exposure to pesticides and immune parameters were evaluated over a short period of time. The total study population consisted of 238 workers occupationally exposed to pesticides and 198 nonoccupationally exposed workers. The study showed that pesticide exposure at levels encountered by workers under different conditions in Europe did not affect the ability of the immune system to respond to vaccination. We could, however, identify individuals within the group of pesticide exposed workers who were genetically characterized by the 2.2 IL-1alpha polymorphism and who showed a lower antibody response, pointing out the importance of the understanding of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the identification of high-risk individuals, which may eventually lead to preventive measures.
PubMed ID
19042953 View in PubMed
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Asthmatic symptoms after exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and other pesticides in the Europit field studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153966
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
D. Boers
L. van Amelsvoort
C. Colosio
E. Corsini
S. Fustinoni
L. Campo
C. Bosetti
C. La Vecchia
T. Vergieva
M. Tarkowski
J. Liesivuori
P. Steerenberg
H. van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - etiology - immunology - urine
Bulgaria
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Fungicides, Industrial - poisoning
Humans
Italy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Netherlands
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology - urine
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - poisoning
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology - immunology
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We conducted a multicenter prospective study to assess the effects of occupational exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamate fungicides and/or other pesticides on self-reported asthma and asthmatic symptoms. This multicenter study was conducted among 248 workers exposed to pesticides and 231 non-exposed workers from five field studies. The five field studies were carried out in The Netherlands, Italy, Finland, and two studies in Bulgaria. Subjects constituting this cohort completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline (before the start of exposure). Ethylenethiourea in urine was determined to assess exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates. In multivariate analyses adjusted for all potential confounders (age, education, residence, smoking, gender, and field study), we found inverse associations, all not statistically significant, between occupational exposure to pesticides and asthma diagnosis (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.15-1.11), complains of chest tightness (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36-1.02), wheeze (OR 0.56; 95% CI 0.32-0.98), asthma attack (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.12-2.25), and asthma medication (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.25-2.53). Furthermore, we reported null associations for multivariate analysis using ethylenethiourea as determinant for exposure. Although exposure to pesticides remains a potential health risk, our results do not suggest an association between exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and/or other pesticides used in our study on asthma and asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
19042955 View in PubMed
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Canadian Farm Operator Study: methodology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103873
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(2):141-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D A Jordan-Simpson
M E Fair
C. Poliquin
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(2):141-55
Date
1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Computer Communication Networks
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pesticides - poisoning
Population Surveillance
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
A mortality study of about 326,000 Canadian male farm operators enumerated in the 1971 Census of Agriculture is being conducted by Health and Welfare Canada in collaboration with Statistics Canada. The study examines the mortality patterns of farm operators in relation to farm practices and a variety of socio-demographic variables. The prime concern is the association between pesticide use and certain cancers suggested in previous studies of farmers. This article describes the methodology used to create the study cohort and the analysis files. Highlights of the preliminary results from this study for Saskatchewan are also presented. Results for other regions are forthcoming. Among the Saskatchewan cohort of farm operators, 94% of deaths occurred within the province. The average age at death was 67.9 years and the average length of survival from 1971 was 13.9 years. Although the cohort as a whole had no excess mortality for any specific cause of death--including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma--significant dose-response relationships were noted between risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and acres sprayed with herbicides in 1970, as well as with dollars spent in 1970 on fuel and oil for farm purposes (1).
PubMed ID
2101279 View in PubMed
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Environmental health collaboration: United States and Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183668
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):333-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
C H Rubin
R L Jones
B. Revich
S L Avaliani
E. Gurvich
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Health Studies Branch, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. CRubin@cdc.gov
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):333-8
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - poisoning
Humans
Infant
International Cooperation
Lead Poisoning - blood
Medical Laboratory Science - instrumentation - methods
Pesticides - poisoning
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia
United States
Abstract
Developed nations share similar challenges to human health from commercial and agricultural chemicals that are released into the environment. Although Russia and the United States are historically distinct and unique, both countries are geographically large and economically dependent on emission-producing surface transportation. This paper describes U.S.-Russian collaborative activities that grew from a 1995 conference in Moscow that brought together environmental health investigators from both countries to discuss common concerns about the human health impact of environmental pollutants. Lead, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and mercury were identified as contaminants of greatest concern. Collaborative studies were initiated that included collecting blood and hair samples and splitting samples for analyses in both countries, and introducing and sharing new portable blood and environmental sample analyses instruments. The findings demonstrated that hair analysis was not a good predictor of BLL and that Russian children in the first city sampled had a mean BLL of 7.7 microg/dl. Although higher than the U.S. mean, this level was below the 10.0 microg/dl CDC level of concern. This manuscript summarizes additional study results and describes their impacts on Russian policy. On-going collaborative environmental investigations are described.
PubMed ID
12971688 View in PubMed
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Exposures to multiple pesticides and the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma in Canadian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113182
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Sep;24(9):1661-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Garthika Navaranjan
Karin Hohenadel
Aaron Blair
Paul A Demers
John J Spinelli
Punam Pahwa
John R McLaughlin
James A Dosman
Len Ritter
Shelley A Harris
Author Affiliation
Occupational Cancer Research Centre, 505 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X3, Canada.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Sep;24(9):1661-73
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Cholinesterase Inhibitors - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Hodgkin Disease - chemically induced - pathology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Occupational Exposure
Pesticides - poisoning
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) associated with exposures to multiple pesticides grouped by various classes, including carcinogenic classifications.
Data collected in the Cross-Canada Study of Pesticides and Health, a population-based incident case-control study in six provinces conducted between 1991 and 1994, were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Cases (n = 316) were identified through provincial cancer registries and hospital records. Controls (n = 1,506) were frequency-matched to cases by age (± 2 years) within each province and were identified through provincial health records, telephone listings, or voter lists. The Cochran-Armitage test was used to check for trends within pesticide classes.
Overall, there was an increase in the risk of HL among all subjects who reported use of five or more insecticides (OR 1.88, 95% CI 0.92-3.87) and among subjects younger than 40 who reported use of two acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.02-9.29). There was an elevated odds ratio associated with reported use of three or more probably carcinogenic pesticides (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.06-5.75), but no increase in risk for use of possibly carcinogenic pesticides. The risk of HL from reported use of fungicides or any pesticides was greater for cases diagnosed before age 40 than for cases diagnosed at or after age 40. When analyses excluded proxy respondents, OR estimates strengthened in some circumstances.
This study found associations between HL and fungicides, insecticides, specifically acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and pesticides previously identified as probable human carcinogens. These associations should be further evaluated, specifically in relation to age at diagnosis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23756639 View in PubMed
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Exposure to animals and selected risk factors among Canadian farm residents with Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, or soft tissue sarcoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184106
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Aug;45(8):857-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Punam Pahwa
Helen H McDuffie
James A Dosman
Diane Robson
John R McLaughlin
John J Spinelli
Shirley Fincham
Author Affiliation
Institute of Agricultural Rural and Environmental Health, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Saskatoon SK S7N 0W8, Canada.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Aug;45(8):857-68
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Animal Husbandry - manpower
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Data Collection
Herbicides - poisoning
Hodgkin Disease - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Multiple Myeloma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Pesticides - poisoning
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sarcoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Exposures to farm animals has been associated with certain rare cancers. Simultaneously, using the same methodology and control group, we conducted a six-province incident, population-based study of Hodgkin's disease (HD), multiple myeloma (MM), and soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Farm residence or work was reported by 38% (n = 119) of HD, 45% (n = 178) of MM, 43% (n = 156) of STS cases and 45% (n = 673) of controls. We conducted conditional logistic regression analyses and report odds ratios (OR(adj)) and 95% confidence intervals. After adjustment for covariates, exposure to farm animals had minimal effect on risk. The independent risk factors after adjustment for covariates were a family history of cancer (MM, STS), occupational uranium exposure (HD), professional driving (MM), and personal previous cancer (MM) or shingles (HD, MM).
PubMed ID
12915787 View in PubMed
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Food safety as seen by an epidemiologist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110579
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Jul 6;99(1):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-6-1968
Author
L e Riche WH
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Jul 6;99(1):22-7
Date
Jul-6-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Food Additives - toxicity
Food Inspection
Food Supply - standards
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Health Surveys
Herbicides - poisoning
Humans
Mass Screening
Pesticides - poisoning
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Notes
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PubMed ID
5663002 View in PubMed
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Integrating the wisdom and experience of indigenous farmworkers to improve farmworker safety and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105473
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2013;7(4):413-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Stephanie Farquhar
Carmen de Jesus Gonzalez
Jen Hall
Julie Samples
Santiago Ventura
Valentin Sanchez
Nargess Shadbeh
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2013;7(4):413-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Agriculture
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oregon - epidemiology
Pesticides - poisoning
Program Development
Rural Population
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Community advisory committees (CACs) increasingly are formed to cultivate partnerships between researchers and communities.
This article details the processes used to recruit CAC members, the purpose and structure of the committees, members' motivation to participate, and examples of member input and influence.
In-depth interviews, meeting notes, and partners' reflections were synthesized to identify key lessons regarding establishing and sustaining effective CACs.
Findings highlight the need for partner agreement on the role of CACs, structured meeting procedures, intentional integration of CAC input into project activities, and training on sharing research information with the community.
CAC members' expertise regarding indigenous culture and experiences increased the project relevance for workers and strengthened research and intervention efforts. Members also reported greater knowledge of safety, health, and workers' rights, and increased confidence to share information. This influence extends beyond the project and contributes to sustained change among CAC members and in the participating communities.
PubMed ID
24375182 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.