Skip header and navigation

Refine By

66 records – page 1 of 7.

An integrated approach for assessing influence of agricultural activities on pesticides in a shallow aquifer in south-eastern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259625
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Nov 15;499:520-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2014
Author
Jens Kværner
Ole Martin Eklo
Eivind Solbakken
Ivar Solberg
Stein Sorknes
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Nov 15;499:520-32
Date
Nov-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - methods
Environmental monitoring
Groundwater - chemistry
Norway
Pesticides - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The study examines the influence of agricultural activities on pesticides in groundwater in an area with fluvial deposits of sand with a top layer of sandy silt and silt, intensive cultivation of potatoes and cereals, and drinking water supplies of households from local groundwater wells. Information about local agricultural practice and washing sites for pesticide spraying equipment, properties of soils and deeper deposits, hydrogeology and groundwater flow, simulations of pesticide leaching, and contents of pesticides and nitrate in groundwater samples from drinking water wells was used to explore extension and reasons of pesticide contamination of groundwater. Pesticides were found in a majority of the sampled wells. Eight different pesticides and metabolites were detected in groundwater samples. The results demonstrate that on fluvial deposits diffuse pollution from spraying of fields with pesticides can result in groundwater contamination in Nordic climate. Higher concentrations of pesticides in some wells can be explained by point source contamination from washing sites. The occurrence of pesticides in drinking water wells touches up the question whether pesticides should be given general approvals, or approvals should include restrictions or recommendations regarding use on areas with high risk of groundwater contamination. Combination of washing sites for pesticide spraying equipment and groundwater wells for drinking water requires attention, proper equipment and practice, and knowledge about pesticides, soil and water to avoid contamination. Samples from wells adjacent to washing sites for pesticide equipment might overestimate average pesticide concentrations in groundwater bodies. In Nordic areas attention should be given to pesticide pollution of shallow groundwater in fluvial deposits. To provide basis for interpretation of results and planning of mitigation measures against pesticide contamination, an integrated approach using information about agronomical practice and point sources, soil properties, hydrogeology and simulations of pesticide leaching is recommended for future surveys and monitoring of pesticides in groundwater.
PubMed ID
24996854 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of human exposure to chemical contaminants in foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221939
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1993 Jan-Feb;10(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
H B Conacher
J. Mes
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Health & Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1993 Jan-Feb;10(1):5-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - administration & dosage - analysis
Canada
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Food analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Mercury - administration & dosage - analysis
Milk, human - chemistry
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Abstract
One of the most important factors in assessing risk to human health from potentially harmful chemicals in foods is the availability of good data on the exposure of the public to such substances. The means of acquiring these data generally involves monitoring programmes using appropriate sampling procedures and reliable analytical methods for measuring the compounds of concern in a variety of substrates. Two approaches are generally employed: a biological monitoring programme which measures substances in human fluids and tissues, and a food analysis monitoring programme, preferably a total diet study, wherein food is prepared for consumption prior to analysis. The choice of approach to use and chemicals to monitor depend on the situation within a particular country. The analysis of food has the advantage of short term impact since problems can be identified relatively quickly and control measures established. Biological monitoring on the other hand tends to indicate both accumulated and current exposure from all sources, including air, water and food. In Canada both approaches have been used for a number of years with major surveys of human milk and adipose tissue, and the total diet study, being conducted approximately every five years. Details of these programmes together with some of the pertinent findings are presented.
PubMed ID
8504874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of human exposure to selected pesticides in Norway by wastewater analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306447
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Jun 25; 723:138132
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-25-2020
Author
Nikolaos I Rousis
Emma Gracia-Lor
Malcolm J Reid
Jose Antonio Baz-Lomba
Yeonsuk Ryu
Ettore Zuccato
Kevin V Thomas
Sara Castiglioni
Author Affiliation
Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Via Mario Negri 2, 20156 Milan, Italy. Electronic address: nrousis@chem.uoa.gr.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Jun 25; 723:138132
Date
Jun-25-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cities
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Humans
Norway
Pesticides - analysis
Pyrethrins
Waste Water - analysis
Abstract
Pesticides offer many benefits for humanity and agriculture, but at the same time pose a potential risk to human health because of their widespread use and high biological activity. Human biomonitoring (HBM) studies are the main tool to investigate human exposure to pesticides and other chemicals, but face limitations such as sampling biases, long time to complete and high costs. Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) is an alternative approach that is centered on the chemical analysis of biomarkers of (pesticide) exposure in urban wastewater. The present study used WBE to assess human exposure to selected classes of pesticides, triazines, pyrethroids and organophosphates, in Norway. Untreated wastewater samples were collected from four cities, covering approximately 20% of the Norwegian population. The highest population weighted mass loads (mg/day/1000 inhabitants) were for alkyl phosphates and the lowest for triazines. Some differences were observed for the two metabolites, 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol (IMPY) and 3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (DCCA), which were higher in the rural city of Hamar. WBE figures were comparable with HBM findings for the specific metabolite of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos methyl (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol; TCPY) but were different for the alkyl phosphates. Pyrethroid intake was calculated and was lower than the acceptable daily intake in all the cities, indicating low risk for human health. This is the most extensive WBE study performed to date to assess national human exposure to pesticides. This study demonstrated that WBE has the potential to be a useful complementary biomonitoring tool for assessing population-wide exposure to pesticides, overcoming some of the limitations of HBM.
PubMed ID
32222514 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of occupational exposure to pesticides in a pooled analysis of agricultural cohorts within the AGRICOH consortium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282689
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2016 Jun;73(6):359-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Maartje Brouwer
Leah Schinasi
Laura E Beane Freeman
Isabelle Baldi
Pierre Lebailly
Gilles Ferro
Karl-Christian Nordby
Joachim Schüz
Maria E Leon
Hans Kromhout
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2016 Jun;73(6):359-67
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Agriculture
Cohort Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Female
France
Humans
Iowa
Leukemia
Lymphoma
Male
Middle Aged
North Carolina
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Pesticides - analysis
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Self Report
Sex Distribution
United States
Abstract
This paper describes methods developed to assess occupational exposure to pesticide active ingredients and chemical groups, harmonised across cohort studies included in the first AGRICOH pooling project, focused on the risk of lymph-haematological malignancies.
Three prospective agricultural cohort studies were included: US Agricultural Health Study (AHS), French Agriculture and Cancer Study (AGRICAN) and Cancer in the Norwegian Agricultural Population (CNAP). Self-reported pesticide use was collected in AHS. Crop-exposure matrices (CEMs) were developed for AGRICAN and CNAP. We explored the potential impact of these differences in exposure assessment by comparing a CEM approach estimating exposure in AHS with self-reported pesticide use.
In AHS, 99% of participants were considered exposed to pesticides, 68% in AGRICAN and 63% in CNAP. For all cohorts combined (n=316 270), prevalence of exposure ranged from 19% to 59% for 14 chemical groups examined, and from 13% to 46% for 33 active ingredients. Exposures were highly correlated within AGRICAN and CNAP where CEMs were applied; they were less correlated in AHS. Poor agreement was found between self-reported pesticide use and assigned exposure in AHS using a CEM approach resembling the assessment for AGRICAN (? -0.00 to 0.33) and CNAP (? -0.01 to 0.14).
We developed country-specific CEMs to assign occupational exposure to pesticides in cohorts lacking self-reported data on the use of specific pesticides. The different exposure assessment methods applied may overestimate or underestimate actual exposure prevalence, and additional work is needed to better estimate how far the exposure estimates deviate from reality.
PubMed ID
27009271 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between background exposure to organochlorine pesticides and the risk of cognitive impairment: A prospective study that accounts for weight change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277805
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Apr-May;89-90:179-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
Duk-Hee Lee
P Monica Lind
David R Jacobs
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
Lars Lind
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Apr-May;89-90:179-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - blood - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - blood
Male
Pesticides - analysis - blood
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Background exposure to organochlorine (OC) pesticides was recently linked to cognitive impairment and dementia in cross-sectional and case-control studies. This prospective study was performed to evaluate if OC pesticides at baseline are associated with the future risk of cognitive impairment in elderly, with particular focus on weight change.
Plasma concentrations of 3 OC pesticides (p,p'-DDE, trans-nonachlor, and hexachlorobenzene) were measured among 989 men and women aged 70years in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). Cognitive impairment was validated by reviewing medical records. During the ten year follow-up, cognitive impairment was developed in 75 subjects. When weight change from age 70 to 75 was considered in analyses, elderly with incident cases before age 75 were excluded to keep the prospective perspective, leaving 795 study subjects and 44 incident cases.
The summary measure of 3 OC pesticides predicted the development of cognitive impairment after adjusting for covariates, including weight change. Compared to subjects with OC pesticides
PubMed ID
26878283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atmospheric concentrations and temporal trends of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in the Arctic during 2011-2018.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304249
Source
Chemosphere. 2021 Mar; 267:128859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2021
Author
Yanfen Hao
Yingming Li
Frank Wania
Ruiqiang Yang
Pu Wang
Qinghua Zhang
Guibin Jiang
Author Affiliation
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China.
Source
Chemosphere. 2021 Mar; 267:128859
Date
Mar-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
London
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Svalbard
Abstract
Passive air samples were deployed in Ny-Ålesund and London Island (Svalbard, High Arctic) annually for seven years (2011-2018) to investigate concentrations, temporal trends and potential sources of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Nine polychlorinated biphenyls and twelve organochlorine pesticides were detected in all samples, with 3,3'-dichlorobiphenyl (PCB-11) being the prevalent congener. Concentrations of most compounds were declining. The ratio of the a- and ?-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) in Arctic air was comparable with that in technical HCH mixtures, but higher than that in the atmosphere of other countries, thereby indicating the impact of historical use as well as the possible photoisomerization of the ?- into the a-isomer. The parent dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was always less abundant than its degradation products dichlorodiphenylethylene (DDE), indicative of the impact of aged DDT sources in the Arctic atmosphere. However, o,p'-/p,p'-DDT ratios suggest only a minor contribution of dicofol-type DDT. A slightly declining temporal trend of the trans-chlordane/cis-chlordane ratio indicated the impact of secondary sources. The atmospheric distribution of the investigated POPs in the Arctic was mainly attributed to long-range atmospheric transport, whereas the influence of human activities from the scientific research stations was minor.
PubMed ID
33176912 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atmospheric Deposition of Organochlorine Pesticides and Industrial Compounds to Seasonal Surface Snow at Four Glacier Sites on Svalbard, 2013-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305368
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2020 08 04; 54(15):9265-9273
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-04-2020
Author
Mark H Hermanson
Elisabeth Isaksson
Richard Hann
Camilla Teixeira
Derek C G Muir
Author Affiliation
Hermanson & Associates, LLC, 2000 W 53rd Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55419, United States.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2020 08 04; 54(15):9265-9273
Date
08-04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Ice Cover
Pesticides - analysis
Seasons
Snow
Svalbard
Abstract
Winter snow from four glacial sites on Svalbard was analyzed for atmospheric deposition of 36 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 7 industrial compounds (OCICs) by GC-high-resolution MS. Thirteen of the OCPs and all OCICs were detected at all sites. Sampling sites are 230 km apart from west to east, but are at varying elevations, ranging from 700 to 1202 m a.s.l. Total OCP flux was greater than total OCIC at all sites and was 5 times greater at Lomonosovfonna, and 3 times greater at Austfonna, the most easterly site. Chlorpyrifos dominated OCP flux at Lomonosovfonna (81.7 pg cm-2 yr-1) and Kongsvegen (60.6 pg cm-2 yr-1), and at Austfonna, but not at Holtedahlfonna where dieldrin dominated. trans-chlordane was a major contributor to OCPs. These three pesticides comprised at least 50% of total OCP at each site. OCIC flux was dominated by pentachloroanisole (PCA) at Lomonosovfonna (23.5 pg cm-2 yr-1) and Kongsvegen (14.1 pg cm-2 yr-1). PCA and hexachlorobenzene comprised at least 63% of all OCICs at each site. Air mass frequency from likely source areas showed that Austfonna had the most frequent long-distance air flow, but showed lower amounts of chlorpyrifos and PCA, suggesting local sources of these compounds to other sites.
PubMed ID
32635725 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blubber-depth distribution and bioaccumulation of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides in Arctic-invading killer whales.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291892
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 01; 601-602:237-246
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Sara Pedro
Conor Boba
Rune Dietz
Christian Sonne
Aqqalu Rosing-Asvid
Martin Hansen
Anthony Provatas
Melissa A McKinney
Author Affiliation
Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation Center, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment and Center for Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. Electronic address: sara.pedro@uconn.edu.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Dec 01; 601-602:237-246
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Animals
Arctic Regions
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Greenland
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Whale, Killer
Abstract
Sightings of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in Greenland have increased in recent years, coincident with sea ice loss. These killer whales are likely from fish-feeding North Atlantic populations, but may have access to marine mammal prey in Greenlandic waters, which could lead to increased exposures to biomagnifying contaminants. Most studies on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and organochlorine (OC) contaminants in killer whales have used biopsies which may not be representative of contaminant concentrations through the entire blubber depth. Here, we measured PCB and OC concentrations in 10 equal-length blubber sections of 18 killer whales harvested in southeast Greenland (2012-2014), and 3 stranded in the Faroe Islands (2008) and Denmark (2005). Overall, very high concentrations of SPCB, Schlordanes (SCHL), and Sdichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (SDDT) were found in the southeast Greenland and Denmark individuals (means of ~40 to 70mgkg-1 lipid weight). These concentrations were higher than in the Faroe Island individuals (means of ~2 to 5mgkg-1 lipid weight) and above those previously reported for other fish-feeding killer whales in the North Atlantic, likely in part due to additional feeding on marine mammals. On a wet weight basis, concentrations of all contaminants were significantly lower in the outermost blubber layer (0.15-0.65cm) compared to all other layers (p
PubMed ID
28554115 View in PubMed
Less detail

A broad cocktail of environmental pollutants found in eggs of three seabird species from remote colonies in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268924
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2015 Jun;34(6):1296-308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Sandra Huber
Nicholas A Warner
Torgeir Nygård
Mikael Remberger
Mikael Harju
Hilde T Uggerud
Lennart Kaj
Linda Hanssen
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2015 Jun;34(6):1296-308
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - growth & development - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - metabolism
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism
Norway
Ovum - chemistry
Pesticides - analysis - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - metabolism
Principal Component Analysis
Abstract
Eggs of 3 seabird species, common eider (Somateria mollisima), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis aristotelis), and European herring gull (Larus argentatus), were surveyed for a broad range of legacy and emerging pollutants to assess chemical mixture exposure profiles of seabirds from the Norwegian marine environment. In total, 201 chemical substances were targeted for analysis ranging from metals, organotin compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and associated metabolites, chlorinated paraffins, chlorinated and nonchlorinated organic pesticides, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), dechlorane plus, octachlorostyrene, brominated flame retardants (BFRs), organophosphorous compounds, brominated and alkyl phenols, cyclic siloxanes, and phthalates. Of the chemicals targeted, 149 substances were found above the detection limits, with metals dominating the contaminant profile and comprising 60% of the total contaminant load. Polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, organophosphorous compounds, and PFAS were the dominant contaminant classes of organic pollutants found within the seabird species, with the highest loads occurring in herring gulls, followed by shag, and common eider. New generation pollutants (e.g., PFAS, organophosphorous compounds, and alkylphenols) were detected at similar or higher concentrations than the legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Time trends of reported concentrations of legacy POPs appear to have decreased in recent decades from the Norwegian coastal environment. Concentrations of detected pollutants do not appear to have a negative effect on seabird population development within the sampling area. Additional stress caused by pollutants, however, may affect seabird health more at the individual level.
PubMed ID
25728907 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of organic contaminants in fjords and bays on the Kenai Peninsula Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302488
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2019 Jun 11; 191(7):427
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-11-2019
Author
S Ian Hartwell
Doug Dasher
Terri Lomax
Author Affiliation
Department: Center for Coastal Monitoring & Assessment, NOAA/NOS, 1305 E. W. Hwy., N/SCI-1, Silver Spring, MD, 20910, USA. ian.hartwell@noaa.gov.
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2019 Jun 11; 191(7):427
Date
Jun-11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Bays - analysis
DDT - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Random Allocation
Salinity
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
A baseline environmental characterization of Seldovia Bay and harbor on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, was conducted using a sediment quality approach. The data was derived from a larger study that assessed seven distinct water bodies on the Kenai Peninsula's north side, draining into Kachemak Bay or into Lower Cook Inlet. Sampling sites for water quality measurements, sediment chemistry, and benthos were randomized within each embayment. Concentrations of 140 organic and elemental contaminants were analyzed. Habitat parameters (depth, salinity, grain size, organic carbon, etc.) that influence species and contaminant distribution were also measured at each sampling site. Concentrations of chlorinated pesticides and PCBs were uniformly low, with the exception of Seldovia Harbor, where total DDT and PCBs exceeded the lower sediment quality guidelines. Concentrations of PAHs were relatively low, except in Seldovia Harbor where concentrations exceeded lower sediment quality guidelines for PAHs, and in one location approached the upper limit. That concentration of PAHs exceeded all other measurements in the NOAA National Status & Trends database for the entire State of Alaska. Characteristics of the PAH compounds present indicate large contributions of pyrogenic sources (burned fuel and/or other organic matter). Seldovia Bay had much lower PAH concentrations than the harbor.
PubMed ID
31187265 View in PubMed
Less detail

66 records – page 1 of 7.