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Adipose organochlorine concentrations and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17245
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Marian Pavuk
Alain Leblanc
Pierre Dumas
Jean Philippe Weber
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Exposure to environmental organochlorines has been examined as a potential risk factor for human breast cancer with mixed results. Our purpose was to examine associations between organochlorines and the development of breast cancer in a large prospective study using stored adipose tissue. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study of 409 postmenopausal women who developed breast cancer and 409 controls selected from the 29,875 women enrolled in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort between 1993 and 1997. We measured concentrations of 14 pesticides and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls in adipose tissue, collected upon enrollment, and estimated relative risk (RR) of breast cancer using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The results showed no higher risk of breast cancer among women with higher levels of any pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR associated with the upper quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2, 2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene concentration was 0.7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.5-1.2] contrasting the lower quartile, and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls the similar risk was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.7). We observed a pattern of substantially lower risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in association with higher levels of most of the pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR for the higher quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene was 0.1 (95% CI, 0.0-0.5) and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls it was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.9). CONCLUSION: The results do not support that higher organochlorine body levels increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The interpretation of the inverse association for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer is currently unclear.
PubMed ID
15668478 View in PubMed
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[A new estimation of the intake of contaminants, based on daily food consumption data]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62083
Source
Nippon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 1994 Jun;49(2):606-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
H. Toyokawa
H. Nishikawa
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
Source
Nippon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 1994 Jun;49(2):606-15
Date
Jun-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
English Abstract
Female
Food Additives - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Japan
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Abstract
Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) are allocated to each food article as published in the Denmark Budget Methods in the Codex Alimentalius of the WHO/FAO Joint Committee when standards of pollutants in food are needed. When daily intakes of Food Additives and Contaminants need to be calculated, the Theoretical Maximum Daily Intake. (TMDI) and the Estimated Maximum Daily Intake (EMDI) have been generally used. TMDI and EMDI are calculated using the formulae shown below: [formula: see text] i: food article (i = 1, ....., n) A: standard value for food additives and contaminants X: mean weight of food article consumed daily l: rate of residue after cooking Exposure assessment should be more exact in order to meet social health needs and to help avoid unnecessarily strict regulations. The U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is continually improving its estimates of the dietary intakes of pesticides and essential minerals, and comparing these intakes with established safe or recommended dietary intake levels. Dietary survey methods have also improved in parallel, with examples being the USDA's Household Food Consumption Survey (1955 and 1965) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II (1976-1980). In Japan, TMDI and EMDI have received more attention as methods of estimating the daily intakes of food additives and contaminants than has the Total Diet Study, even though the former are not as exact as the latter. The Japanese National Nutrition Survey is one of the most respected nutrition surveys in the world, because it has continued nationwide yearly since 1946. Nevertheless, it is very unfortunate that no one utilizes the Household Food Consumption Survey data for the estimation of intakes of food additives and contaminants, because that is not the primary purpose of the Japanese National Nutrition Survey. Practically, there are neither foods which have an uniform of food additives and contaminants nor individuals who consume uniform amounts of each food item. In this report the authors propose a revised estimation method for the daily intake of food contaminants and additives, based on food consumption data of 159 female volunteers, without using the National Nutrition Survey data. The results obtained are as follows: 1) This method succeeded in making clear the intakes of food additives and contaminants. Mean, maximum and minimum values and distribution curves for the target population were obtained. 2) The suggested name for this method is "Estimated Ecological Daily Intake (EEDI)", which is processed in terms of the food consumption structure for calculation, and methodologically estimated by food ecology.
PubMed ID
8041017 View in PubMed
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[Antierythrocyte antibodies and the organochlorine compound carrier state in parturients who have not had a home or occupational contact with chemical substances]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60762
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1977 Dec;(6):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1977

Assessment of hazards associated with pesticide container disposal and of rinsing procedures as a means of enabling disposal of pesticide containers in sanitary landfills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242300
Source
J Environ Sci Health B. 1983;18(3):305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
J R Miles
C R Harris
D C Morrow
Source
J Environ Sci Health B. 1983;18(3):305-15
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Ontario
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Pesticides - toxicity
Refuse Disposal
Safety
Abstract
To study problems associated with pesticide container disposal, a small vegetable production area in southwestern Ontario, the Thedford Marsh, was selected as the site for a model study. A container collection system was organized during the 1981 growing season, with collections being made from the ca. 50 growers on the marsh twice each month. In addition to the regular collection program a cleanup service for empty pesticide containers stored on farms or discarded on public lands also was initiated. More than 3600 containers were collected and disposed of at an authorized landfill site. Ca. 2/3 were herbicide containers, ca. 1/4 were insecticide containers, and 3% were fungicide containers. Unrinsed containers contained as much as 5 1/2% of the original contents with an average of 1%. Containers rinsed by the triple rinse method or using rinsing devices (E-Z Rinse, JET Rinse) generally contained less than 0.1% of the original content. Some formulations presented rinsing problems due to settling and caking. The results indicated that, while unacceptable quantities of pesticide residues remain in unrinsed containers, most rinsed pesticide containers will be acceptable for disposal at municipal sanitary landfill sites.
PubMed ID
6875215 View in PubMed
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Average total dietary intakes of organochlorine compounds from the Finnish diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236914
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1986 Jun;182(6):484-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
Moilanen, R
Pyysalo, H
Kumpulainen, J
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1986 Jun;182(6):484-8
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dairy Products - analysis
Diet
Eggs - analysis
Finland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Insecticides - analysis
Meat - analysis
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Abstract
As a contribution to the FAO/WHO organochlorine monitoring programme, samples of milk, eggs, beef pork, chops, game, animal livers as well as fish-liver oils were analysed for PCB-, DDT- and toxaphene compounds, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), heptachlor and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH). From the annual consumption of the foodstuffs investigated average intakes of organochlorines were estimated and compared with the acceptable daily intakes (ADI) as set by FAO/WHO. Intakes from the sources studied were then compared with those from fish, butter and margarine. Total average dietary intakes were determined to be 14.4 micrograms/day for PCB, 2.9 for DDT, 2,3 for gamma-HCH, 1.7 for HCB, and 0.5 micrograms/day for heptachlor representing 0.08% of the ADI for DDT, 0.3% for HCH, 4.2% for HCB and 1.4% of the ADI for heptachlor.
PubMed ID
3751324 View in PubMed
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Biobeds for environmental protection from pesticide use--a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92855
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6206-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2008
Author
Castillo María del Pilar
Torstensson Lennart
Stenström John
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7025, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. maria.castillo@mikrob.slu.se
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6206-19
Date
Aug-13-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - instrumentation - methods
Agrochemicals - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Aluminum Silicates
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Europe
Latin America
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Pesticides - adverse effects - analysis
Poaceae
Soil
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sweden
Water Pollution - prevention & control
Abstract
Biobeds originated in Sweden in response to the need for simple and effective methods to minimize environmental contamination from pesticide use, especially when filling spraying equipment, a typical point source of contamination. The biobed system has attracted attention in several countries, where work is being conducted to adapt it to local conditions and applications. As a consequence, the biobed system has been more or less modified and sometimes renamed, for example, as biomassbed in Italy, biofilter in Belgium, and Phytobac and biobac in France. The effectiveness and simplicity of the biobed also make it suitable for use in developing countries, and different adaptations of the biobed concept now exist in, for instance, Peru, Guatemala, and Ecuador. When the modification of the biobed includes an intention to use it for retention and degradation of pesticides in sprayer washings, the construction has to be adapted to, for example, lined biobeds to ensure that no pesticide leaching will occur. Replacement of some of the original materials in the Swedish biomixture (straw, peat, and soil) can also change the performance of the system, for instance, the amount, activity, and composition of the microbial community that develops. This review presents the state of the art of biobeds and similar systems in Sweden and worldwide and identifies future research needs. Factors affecting the efficiency of biobeds in terms of degradation and retention of pesticides are discussed, with particular emphasis on the microbial processes involved.
PubMed ID
18598049 View in PubMed
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Breast adipose tissue concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls and other organochlorines and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199563
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Jan;9(1):55-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
K J Aronson
A B Miller
C G Woolcott
E E Sterns
D R McCready
L A Lickley
E B Fish
G Y Hiraki
C. Holloway
T. Ross
W M Hanna
S K SenGupta
J P Weber
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. aronson@post.queensu.ca
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Jan;9(1):55-63
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Age Factors
Biopsy
Breast - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - classification
Female
Humans
Insecticides - analysis - blood - classification
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood - classification
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Numerous studies have examined the relationship between organochlorines and breast cancer, but the results are not consistent. In most studies, organochlorines were measured in serum, but levels in breast adipose tissue are higher and represent cumulative internal exposure at the target site for breast cancer. Therefore, a hospital-based case-control study was conducted in Ontario, Canada to evaluate the association between breast cancer risk and breast adipose tissue concentrations of several organochlorines. Women scheduled for excision biopsy of the breast were enrolled and completed a questionnaire. The biopsy tissue of 217 cases and 213 benign controls frequency matched by study site and age in 5-year groups was analyzed for 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, total PCBs, and 10 other organochlorines, including p,p'-1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the magnitude of risk. While adjusting for age, menopausal status, and other factors, odds ratios (ORs) were above 1.0 for almost all organochlorines except five pesticide residues. The ORs were above two in the highest concentration categories of PCB congeners 105 and 118, and the ORs for these PCBs increased linearly across categories (Ps for trend
PubMed ID
10667464 View in PubMed
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Canadian Total Diet Study in 1998: pesticide levels in foods from Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, and corresponding dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30285
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
D F Rawn
X L Cao
J. Doucet
D J Davies
W F Sun
R W Dabeka
W H Newsome
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division (2203D), Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0L2. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant
Insecticides - analysis
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Middle Aged
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The Canadian Total Diet Study is a national survey to determine the level of chemical contaminants in the Canadian food supply. Food samples were collected from Whitehorse, Yukon, supermarkets as part of the study in 1998. Whitehorse was chosen as a sampling centre, despite its small population (n = 19,000), to determine if residue levels were different in foods available in northern communities relative to levels observed in previous studies in the more populated south. Foods were prepared as for consumption before pesticide residue analysis. Residue levels observed in most foods were similar to levels observed in samples from previous surveys from southern Canadian cities. Malathion and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene), a transformation product of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl(ethane), were the two most frequently detected compounds (26.4 and 25.8%, respectively). The majority of pesticides, however, had a detection frequency of
PubMed ID
15195471 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.