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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
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Attrition survey of physiotherapists in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221881
Source
Physiother Can. 1992;44(2):17-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
R. Wolpert
K. Yoshida
Author Affiliation
Infant Mental Health Promotion Project of Metropolitan Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1992;44(2):17-24
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Ontario
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Modalities - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined demographic differences between practising and non-practising physiotherapists, reasons for leaving the profession and factors that might influence return. A mailed survey was sent to three groups of Ontario physiotherapists: 1) those who had not renewed registration to practice (Cancelled); 2) those who were registered but not practising (Inactive); and 3) a group of actively practising therapists randomly selected (Control). The overall response rate was 76%. Significant differences among the three groups were in personal income and membership in the professional association (CPA). The majority of those not practising were not working outside the home and approximately half planned to return. The two most important reasons for not working in physiotherapy were: a) raising a family; and b) the desire for new challenges and further education. The most important factors that would influence return were: a) opportunity for flexible hours for those planning to return; and b) upgrading of the profession for those not planning to return. Family related and professional/job issues for those not working in physiotherapy and differences between practising and non-practising groups are discussed. Strategies for retention and return are recommended.
PubMed ID
10119256 View in PubMed
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Bullying and employee turnover among healthcare workers: a three-wave prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131505
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2011 Sep;19(6):742-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Annie Hogh
Helge Hoel
Isabella G Carneiro
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. annie.hogh@psy.ku.dk
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2011 Sep;19(6):742-51
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bullying
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the risk of turnover among targets of bullying at work.
Exposure to bullying seems to leave targets with intentions to leave their workplaces. However, it is uncertain to what extent they actually leave.
Data were collected by questionnaires in a three-wave study among Danish healthcare workers at the time of graduation (T1 ), 1 (T2 ) and 2 years (T3 ) later. We followed 2154 respondents who participated in all three waves.
The first year after graduation, 9.2% reported being bullied at work, 1.8% frequently. Follow-up analyses showed a strong relationship between exposure to bullying at T2 and turnover at T3 [odds ratio (OR) for frequently bullied = 3.1]. The inclusion of push factors such as low social support and low sense of community, intention to leave and ill health did not change the relation between bullying and turnover significantly. Three reasons for quitting stood out among reasons given by the bullied respondents: poor leadership, being exposed to negative behaviour and health problems.
Bullying may be costly to an organization in terms of staff turnover and subsequent recruitment and training of replacements. IMPACT FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers should regularly monitor the psychosocial work environment. To prevent bullying local policies and procedures should be developed, implemented and evaluated.
PubMed ID
21899627 View in PubMed
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Canadian cancer nurses' views on recruitment and retention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143576
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Mar;18(2):205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Debra Bakker
Lorna Butler
Margaret Fitch
Esther Green
Karin Olson
Greta Cummings
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada. dbakker@laurentian.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Mar;18(2):205-14
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Research
Humans
Incidence
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - nursing
Nurses - psychology - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Nursing, Supervisory
Oncology Nursing
Organizational Culture
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Social Perception
Workplace
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore oncology nurses' perceptions about recruitment and retention.
Competition among healthcare organizations to recruit and retain qualified nurses is a real-life challenge. Focusing attention on human resource planning in oncology is highlighted by both the worsening nursing shortage and cancer incidence.
A participatory action research approach was used and 12 focus groups with 91 cancer nurses were conducted across Canada to collect data about strategies that could improve recruitment and retention.
Four themes emerged reflecting oncology nurses' beliefs and values about organizational practices that attract and retain nurses and they are as follows: (1) recognizing oncology as a specialty, (2) tacit knowledge no longer enough, (3) gratification as a retaining factor, and (4) relationship dependent on environment.
Participants highlighted leadership, recognition and professional and continuing education opportunities as critical to job satisfaction and organizational commitment.
Recruitment and retention were viewed as a continuum where organizational investment begins with a well-developed orientation and ongoing mentorship to ensure knowledge development. The challenge for nurse leaders is to use the evidence generated from this study and previous studies to develop professional practice environments that facilitate the cultural changes needed to build and sustain a quality nursing workforce.
PubMed ID
20465748 View in PubMed
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Career patterns and job satisfaction of Canadian nurse educators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223345
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Aug;17(8):1002-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
M C Barrett
D. Goldenberg
S. Faux
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Aug;17(8):1002-11
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Faculty, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Ontario
Peer Group
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the career patterns and job satisfaction of Ontario university and college nurse educators. A descriptive survey design was employed using mailed questionnaires. The sample comprised 60 nurse educators, 30 from three universities and 30 from three colleges. Forty-four returned the completed questionnaire, giving a response rate of 73%. The variables about the career patterns and goals of the nurse educators included their past and present job satisfaction. Career patterns were described as stable, double-track, interrupted and unstable. Similarities and differences were compared and described in relation to these factors. Significant differences in job satisfaction were found between university and college faculty on nine of the 36 job characteristics (for example, leadership style, independence, autonomy and salary). There were no significant differences in job satisfaction for each of the career patterns and the selected demographic variables of age, years in nursing education, educational level and salary between the university and college faculty.
PubMed ID
1506536 View in PubMed
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Challenging conventional wisdom about who quits: revelations from corporate America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159229
Source
J Appl Psychol. 2008 Jan;93(1):1-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Peter W Hom
Loriann Roberson
Aimee D Ellis
Author Affiliation
Department of Management, Arizona State University, Temple, AZ 85287, USA. peter.hom@asu.edu
Source
J Appl Psychol. 2008 Jan;93(1):1-34
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Career Mobility
Employee Performance Appraisal - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Industry - manpower
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Sex ratio
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
Findings from 20 corporations from the Attrition and Retention Consortium, which collects quit statistics about 475,458 professionals and managers, extended and disputed established findings about who quits. Multilevel analyses revealed that company tenure is curvilinearly related to turnover and that a job's past attrition rate strengthens the (negative) performance- exit relationship. Further, women quit more than men, while African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans quit more than White Americans, though racial differences disappeared after confounds were controlled for. African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American women quit more than men of the same ethnicities and White Americans, but statistical controls nullified evidence for dual discrimination toward minority women. Greater corporate flight among women and minorities during early employment nonetheless hampers progress toward a more diversified workforce in corporate America.
PubMed ID
18211132 View in PubMed
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Clinical coaching in forensic psychiatry: an innovative program to recruit and retain nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150619
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2009 May;47(5):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Gail Thorpe
Pamela Moorhouse
Carolyn Antonello
Author Affiliation
Schizophrenia Clinic, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. gthorpe@rohcg.on.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2009 May;47(5):43-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Career Choice
Curriculum
Forensic Nursing - education - manpower
Forensic Psychiatry - education - manpower
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Mentors - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Ontario is currently experiencing a nursing shortage crisis. Recruitment and retention of nursing staff are critical issues. In response, retention strategies have been developed by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Late Career Nurse Initiative is one such strategy. This innovative program encourages nurses age 55 and older to remain in the workforce by providing opportunities to use their nursing experience in less physically demanding alternate roles for a portion of their time. The Royal Ottawa Health Care Group has developed a clinical coach program in forensics that matches these veteran nurses with new graduates or nurses new to forensic psychiatric nursing. The program has resulted in retention rates of more than 91% after 1 year. This article provides background about the program and highlights its outcomes.
PubMed ID
19489514 View in PubMed
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Data-based nurse staffing indicators with Bayesian networks explain nurse job satisfaction: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138172
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2011 May;67(5):1053-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Taina Pitkäaho
Olli-Pekka Ryynänen
Pirjo Partanen
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Kuopio Campus, University of Eastern Finland. taina.pitkaaho@kuh.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2011 May;67(5):1053-66
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bayes Theorem
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Hospital Information Systems
Hospitals, University
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Workplace
Abstract
This paper is a report of a pilot study to examine the relationship of nursing intensity, work environment intensity and nursing resources to nurse job satisfaction.
There is an ever increasing amount of information in hospital information systems; however, still very little of it is actually used in nursing management and leadership.
The combination of a retrospective time series and cross-sectional survey data was used. The time series patient data of 9704 in/outpatients and nurse data of 110 nurses were collected from six inpatient units in a medical clinic of a university hospital in Finland in 2006. A unit-level measure of nurse job satisfaction was collected with a survey (n = 98 nurses) in the autumn of 2006. Bayesian networks were applied to examine a model that explains nurse job satisfaction.
In a hospital data system, 18 usable nurse staffing indicators were identified. There were four nurse staffing indicators: patient acuity from nursing intensity subgroup, diagnosis-related group volume from work environment subgroup, and skill mix and nurse turnover from nursing resources subgroup that explained the likelihood of nurse job satisfaction in the final model. The Bayesian networks also revealed the elusive non-linear relationship between nurse job satisfaction and patient acuity.
Survey-based information on nurse job satisfaction can be modelled with data-based nurse staffing indicators. Nurse researchers could use the Bayesian approach to obtain information about the effects of nurse staffing on nursing outcomes.
PubMed ID
21198804 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.