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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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Advancing nursing leadership in long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143603
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jennifer O'Brien
Margaret Ringland
Susan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Human Resources and Support Services, St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph. jobrien@sjhcg.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics, Nursing
Focus Groups
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Leadership
Long-Term Care
Mentors
Nurse Administrators
Nurses
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Research
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Turnover
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
Nurses working in the long-term care (LTC) sector face unique workplace stresses, demands and circumstances. Designing approaches to leadership training and other supportive human-resource strategies that reflect the demands of the LTC setting fosters a positive work life for nurses by providing them with the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the care team and to address resident and family issues. Through the St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph demonstration site project, funded by the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Excelling as a Nurse Leader in Long Term Care training program and the Mentor Team program were developed to address these needs. Evaluation results show that not only have individual nurses benefitted from taking part in these programs, but also that the positive effects were felt in other parts of the LTC home (as reported by Directors of Care). By creating a generally healthier work environment, it is anticipated that these programs will also have a positive effect on recruitment and retention.
PubMed ID
20463447 View in PubMed
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Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
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[Answer from the Lakarforbundet: we are aware of the problem--and we must find a solution together].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196907
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Sep 13;97(37):4036-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-13-2000

Attitudes to job turnover among Finnish anaesthetists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153277
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2009 Mar;59(2):126-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
P M Lindfors
O A Meretoja
R A Luukkonen
M J Elovainio
T J Leino
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, PO Box 340, 00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. pirjo.lindfors@kolumbus.fi
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2009 Mar;59(2):126-9
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anesthesiology - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Personnel Turnover
Abstract
Structural changes have led to higher workload and more frequent conflicts among hospital staff, which in turn has been shown to be associated with increased employee turnover.
To study the willingness of anaesthetists to change their employment and factors associated with it. Work-related, individual and family-related factors were investigated as potential influences on such willingness.
A postal questionnaire was sent to all working Finnish anaesthetists (N = 550).
The response rate was 60%; 175 (53% of responders) were men. Of the respondents, 31% were willing to consider changing to another physician's job and 43% to a profession other than medicine. The most important correlates for these views were conflicts with superiors (odds ratio 6.1; 95% confidence interval 2.1-17.7) and co-workers (4.2; 1.4-12.2), low job control (2.6; 1.4-4.9), a sense of organizational injustice (2.4; 1.3-4.6), stress (6.5; 2.6-16.3) and job dissatisfaction (4.6; 2.4-8.8).
The establishment of respect, trust and genuine dialogue between co-workers and superiors is needed to minimize the risk of loss of members of this occupational group.
PubMed ID
19129240 View in PubMed
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Attrition survey of physiotherapists in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221881
Source
Physiother Can. 1992;44(2):17-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
R. Wolpert
K. Yoshida
Author Affiliation
Infant Mental Health Promotion Project of Metropolitan Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1992;44(2):17-24
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Ontario
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Modalities - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined demographic differences between practising and non-practising physiotherapists, reasons for leaving the profession and factors that might influence return. A mailed survey was sent to three groups of Ontario physiotherapists: 1) those who had not renewed registration to practice (Cancelled); 2) those who were registered but not practising (Inactive); and 3) a group of actively practising therapists randomly selected (Control). The overall response rate was 76%. Significant differences among the three groups were in personal income and membership in the professional association (CPA). The majority of those not practising were not working outside the home and approximately half planned to return. The two most important reasons for not working in physiotherapy were: a) raising a family; and b) the desire for new challenges and further education. The most important factors that would influence return were: a) opportunity for flexible hours for those planning to return; and b) upgrading of the profession for those not planning to return. Family related and professional/job issues for those not working in physiotherapy and differences between practising and non-practising groups are discussed. Strategies for retention and return are recommended.
PubMed ID
10119256 View in PubMed
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224 records – page 1 of 23.