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19 records – page 1 of 2.

[Adolescent health status and the medical problems of recruiting for the Armed Forces of Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75095
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jul-Aug;(7-8):7-8
Publication Type
Article

Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of the reasons for an unjustified call-up for military service based on health status].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208791
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1997 Apr;318(4):11-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997

Canadian cancer nurses' views on recruitment and retention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143576
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Mar;18(2):205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Debra Bakker
Lorna Butler
Margaret Fitch
Esther Green
Karin Olson
Greta Cummings
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada. dbakker@laurentian.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Mar;18(2):205-14
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Research
Humans
Incidence
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - nursing
Nurses - psychology - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Nursing, Supervisory
Oncology Nursing
Organizational Culture
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Social Perception
Workplace
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore oncology nurses' perceptions about recruitment and retention.
Competition among healthcare organizations to recruit and retain qualified nurses is a real-life challenge. Focusing attention on human resource planning in oncology is highlighted by both the worsening nursing shortage and cancer incidence.
A participatory action research approach was used and 12 focus groups with 91 cancer nurses were conducted across Canada to collect data about strategies that could improve recruitment and retention.
Four themes emerged reflecting oncology nurses' beliefs and values about organizational practices that attract and retain nurses and they are as follows: (1) recognizing oncology as a specialty, (2) tacit knowledge no longer enough, (3) gratification as a retaining factor, and (4) relationship dependent on environment.
Participants highlighted leadership, recognition and professional and continuing education opportunities as critical to job satisfaction and organizational commitment.
Recruitment and retention were viewed as a continuum where organizational investment begins with a well-developed orientation and ongoing mentorship to ensure knowledge development. The challenge for nurse leaders is to use the evidence generated from this study and previous studies to develop professional practice environments that facilitate the cultural changes needed to build and sustain a quality nursing workforce.
PubMed ID
20465748 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the 1996 and 2001 census data for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal workers in health care occupations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157467
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2008 Jan-Mar;48(1):123-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Emily Lecompte
Mireille Baril
Author Affiliation
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada.
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2008 Jan-Mar;48(1):123-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Censuses
Culture
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Education, Professional
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Health Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To meet the unique health needs of Aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis), it is important to increase and encourage Aboriginal representation in health care. One Federal initiative, the Aboriginal Health Human Resource Initiative (AHHRI) at Health Canada, focuses on: (1) increasing the number of Aboriginal people working in health careers; (2) adapting health care educational curricula to support the development of cultural competencies; and (3) improving the retention of health care workers in Aboriginal communities. A health care system that focuses on understanding the unique challenges, concerns, and needs of Aboriginal people can better respond to this specific population, which suffers disproportionately from ill health in comparison to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. This report examines the supply of Aboriginal health care providers in Canada, based on geographic region, area of residence, Aboriginal identity, and occupation. Findings are drawn from the 1996 and 2001 censuses from Statistics Canada. Quantitative results provide a greater understanding of labour force characteristics of First Nation, Inuit, Métis, and non-Aboriginal health providers.
PubMed ID
18447068 View in PubMed
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Factors affecting recruitment and retention of rehabilitation professionals in Northern Ontario, Canada: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256485
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2619
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
C S Winn
B A Chisholm
J A Hummelbrunner
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. winncs@mcmaster.ca.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2619
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allied Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Audiology - statistics & numerical data
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapists - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Rural Health Services - manpower
Speech-Language Pathology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Historically, Northern Ontario, Canada, has been an underserviced area for health care, including the rehabilitation professions of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech-language pathology and audiology. The Rehabilitation Studies and Northern Studies Stream programs were created in the 1990s to improve the recruitment and retention of rehabilitation professionals to Northern Ontario. However, no recent research has been conducted examining the factors that lead to rehabilitation professionals relocating to and remaining in the region.
A cross-sectional survey of rehabilitation professionals living and working in Northern Ontario was administered in 2009. Information collected included demographics and a rating of the personal and professional factors that had an impact on an individual's decision to continue living and working in Northern Ontario.
A total of 345 individuals completed the survey (response rate 57%). Multiple personal and professional factors were closely linked to recruitment and retention with differences noted between those individuals originally from Northern Ontario and those who were not. Rural or remote education experiences and rural/remote origin were identified as important recruitment factors while job satisfaction and lifestyle options were important factors for retention of rehabilitation professionals to rural and remote areas of practice.
This study has provided updated information specific to the recruitment and retention of rehabilitation professionals in Northern Ontario, Canada. These findings support previous work examining health professions worldwide and have clear implications for educational programs, funding agencies, and health human resource planning in underserviced areas.
PubMed ID
24717094 View in PubMed
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Family medicine research capacity building: five-weekend programs in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144886
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Mar;56(3):e94-e100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Walter Rosser
Marshall Godwin
Rachelle Seguin
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, 220 Bagot St., Kingston, Ontario. rosserw@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Mar;56(3):e94-e100
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - education
Capacity building
Family Practice - education
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Ontario
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Program Development - methods
Abstract
Research is not perceived as an integral part of family practice by most family physicians working in community practices. OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM To assist community-based practitioners in answering research questions that emerge from their practices in order for them to gain a better understanding of research and its value.
The Ontario College of Family Physicians developed a program consisting of 5 sets of weekend workshops, each 2 months apart. Two pilots of the 5-weekend program occurred between 2000 and 2003. After the pilots, thirteen 5-weekend programs were held in 2 waves by 20 facilitators, who were trained in one of two 1-day seminars.
This 5-weekend program, developed and tested in Ontario, stimulates community practitioners to learn how to answer research questions emerging from their practices. A 1-day seminar is adequate to train facilitators to successfully run these programs. Evaluations by both facilitators and program participants were very positive, with many participants stating that their clinical practices were improved as a result of the program. The program has been adapted for residency training, and it has already been used internationally.
Notes
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2004 May 26;2 Suppl 2:S60-415655092
Cites: Public Health. 2005 Mar;119(3):174-8315661126
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2006 Jul-Aug;4(4):373-416868243
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 May 28;166(11):1419-2012054410
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Dec;43:2151-79426934
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2004 May 26;2 Suppl 2:S17-2215655082
Cites: Fam Med. 1994 Oct;26(9):579-827843508
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2002 Jul;51(7):59312160486
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2002 Dec;31(12):1139-4212516520
Cites: Eur J Gen Pract. 2003 Jun;9(2):41-714611015
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;2 Suppl 1:S3-3215080220
Cites: Acad Med. 2004 Nov;79(11):1095-10215504779
Cites: Fam Med. 1994 May;26(5):303-88050649
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2010 May;56(5):41220463267
PubMed ID
20228296 View in PubMed
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"Genetic discrimination": results of a survey of genetics professionals, primary care physicians, patients and public.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176206
Source
Health Law Rev. 1998-1999;7(3):7-8
Publication Type
Article

Influence of undergraduate and postgraduate education on recruitment and retention of physicians in rural Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215081
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1995 Jun;18(3):217-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
M. Watanabe
G H Fick
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1995 Jun;18(3):217-28
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Population Dynamics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Specialization
Abstract
The composition of practising physicians in Alberta, with respect to medical school of graduation, changed between 1986 and 1991. The percentage of graduates of the 2 Alberta medical schools increased, and the percentage of graduates of foreign medical schools decreased. Graduates of the University of Calgary increased their percentage in family practice in urban and rural communities except in Edmonton, while graduates of the University of Alberta increased their percentage almost everywhere except in communities with populations of
PubMed ID
7554587 View in PubMed
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The medical school applicant pool from Alaska: implications for the development of medical education in the state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146812
Source
Alaska Med. 2009 Sep;51:7-9, 44-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Dennis Paul Valenzeno
Julie Sicilia
Author Affiliation
Alaska WWAMI Biomedical Program University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508-4614, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 2009 Sep;51:7-9, 44-6
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Career Choice
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medically underserved area
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - supply & distribution
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data - trends
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data - trends
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several recent physician workforce reports in Alaska have called for a rapid increase in the number of state-supported medical school positions to between 30 and 50 new students per year, preferably through WWAMI - Alaska's Medical School. Here we compare applicant and matriculant data for Alaska WWAMI and for Alaskans applying to all U.S. allopathic medical schools to national applicant and matriculant trends gathered from databases of the Association of American Medical Colleges. The assessment demonstrates that 1) changes in the number of Alaska WWAMI applicants parallels changes in the number of Alaskans applying to all U.S. medical schools, but these do not track changes in the national applicant pool, 2) historical records suggest that a fundamental change is needed to provide an applicant pool to support a class size of 50 within the next decade, 3) smaller states with independent, four-year medical schools generate more medical school applicants per capita than Alaska.
PubMed ID
19998707 View in PubMed
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 2.