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13 records – page 1 of 2.

Alaska air carrier operator and pilot safety practices and attitudes: a statewide survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177283
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004 Nov;75(11):984-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
George A Conway
Alexandra Hill
Stephanie Martin
Nicolle A Mode
Matthew D Berman
Diana M Bensyl
Jan C Manwaring
Katherine A Moran
Author Affiliation
CDC/NIOSH Alaska Field Station, 4230 University Dr., Suite 310, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. gconway@cdc.gov
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004 Nov;75(11):984-91
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - prevention & control
Adult
Alaska
Attitude
Aviation
Employment - economics
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Personnel Selection - standards
Questionnaires
Safety
Workload
Abstract
Aviation crashes are a leading cause of occupational fatalities in Alaska, with Alaskan pilots having nearly 100 times the fatality rate of U.S. workers overall. A survey was designed to study pilot and company practices and attitudes in order to develop intervention strategies that would reduce aviation fatalities.
Two surveys were administered: one of air carrier operators and one of active commercial pilots. Surveys from 153 air taxi and public-use operators were received at a 79% response rate.
There are almost 2000 pilots employed in Alaska during peak season by air taxi operators and public agencies. Surveyed operators and pilots generally agreed that improved weather information and regional hazards training would be effective ways to prevent crashes. Operators were more in favor of operator financial incentives (p
PubMed ID
15559000 View in PubMed
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Anaphylaxis: assessment of a disease-based military medical standard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131737
Source
Mil Med. 2011 Aug;176(8):889-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Peter R Zeindler
Alan Gervais
Author Affiliation
Canadian Forces Environmental Medicine Establishment, 1133 Sheppard Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario M3K 2B3.
Source
Mil Med. 2011 Aug;176(8):889-95
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Canada
Humans
Military Medicine - standards
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Personnel Selection - standards
Physical Fitness
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Abstract
Although widespread, the use of disease-based employment medical standards is poorly understood or researched. A probabilistic model and threshold value are developed and applied to a military (Canadian Forces [CF]) medical standard for anaphylaxis. Frequency estimates of prevalence, occurrence, and impairing reactions are determined from the literature for military applicants and from medical chart review of military members identified by prescriptions for self-administered epinephrine. The prevalence of prescriptions is 1.13% (CI 1.05, 1.22) and 0.86% (CI 0.72, 1.00) in the CF Regular Force and applicant populations, respectively. The proposed model predicts the annual risk of an impairing allergic reaction in the CF population ranges from 0.1% to 0.16%/year, well below the proposed threshold of 0.5%. The majority of this risk arises from new cases and not recurrences. Requirement for care increases with recurrence. This model allows a useful method of disease-based medical standard review.
PubMed ID
21882778 View in PubMed
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Catalog of Canadian fitness screening protocols for public safety occupations that qualify as a bona fide occupational requirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123014
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Apr;27(4):1168-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Robert J Gumieniak
Veronica K Jamnik
Norman Gledhill
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Apr;27(4):1168-73
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Catalogs as Topic
Fires
Humans
Law Enforcement
Nuclear Power Plants
Occupations - standards
Personnel Selection - standards
Physical Fitness
Prisons
Abstract
The purpose of this paper was to provide succinct descriptions of prominent job-specific physical fitness protocols (JSPFPs) that were constructed to satisfy the legal obligations to qualify as a bona fide occupational requirement for physically demanding public safety occupations. The intent of a JSPFP is to determine whether an applicant or incumbent possesses the necessary physical capabilities to safely and efficiently perform the critical on-the-job tasks encountered in a physically demanding occupation. The JSPFP information summarized in this report is accessible in full detail in the public domain. Therefore, prospective JSPFP participants and fitness professionals who require the information to train participants can fully inform themselves about the specific protocol requirements and associated fitness training implications.
PubMed ID
22744418 View in PubMed
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[Methodological basis of the occupational screening of persons with poor vision for assembly line work].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236969
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1986 Jun;(6):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986

[Physical development as 1 of the criteria of the occupational fitness of technical school students]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74517
Source
Gig Sanit. 1978 Dec;(12):97-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1978

[Physiologic and hygienic prerequisites for the development of criteria of professional aptitude of adolescents for operating sewing machines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232200
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Nov;(11):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

[Psychophysiological criteria of the occupational suitability of adolescents for gas-arc welding].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238818
Source
Gig Sanit. 1985 May;(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985

Required qualifications in the Swedish Public Dental Health Service as indicators of organizational ideology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75761
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Dec;59(6):396-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
C. Franzén
B. Söderfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Sweden. cecilia.franzen@telia.com
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Dec;59(6):396-405
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - standards
Advertising
Chi-Square Distribution
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Observer Variation
Odds Ratio
Organizational Culture
Personnel Selection - standards
Professional Competence - standards
Public Health Dentistry - manpower - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The manifestly required qualifications in job advertisements in the Journal of the Swedish Dental Association were analyzed as indicators of the organizational ideology in the Swedish Public Dental Health Service from the employers' viewpoint. All job advertisements that concerned dentists and managers on different hierarchical levels in general dentistry from January 1990 to December 1998 were included (n = 1152). The number of vacancies was 1856. The textual material was analyzed by content analysis, permitting quantitative descriptions of the text and analysis of the latent characteristics. Words and phrases were classified into categories on different levels of abstraction developed from the theoretical background and the purpose of the study. Altogether 5705 required qualifications were categorized. The inter-coder reliability of the first-level categorization resulted in 81% correspondence of the classification, and lambda = 0.90. Qualifications were more frequently required with higher hierarchical job positions, and personality characteristics were more frequent than technical competence and knowledge. Qualifications interpreted as related to economic goals occurred more frequently than those related to odontological goals. The qualification demands reflected the language of human resource management (HRM), emphasizing the 'soft' people-centered approach and was interpreted as an 'ideal' model of HRM. Dentists were regarded as a profitable organizational asset rather than participants in relations with patients. In conclusion, the results indicate an organizational ideology primarily of economic character.
PubMed ID
11831491 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.