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[A comparative analysis of different approaches to identifying cardiovascular diseases in coal miners during medical selection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49975
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
L N Sizonenko
V V Cherkesov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis
Coal Mining
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis
Personnel Selection - methods
Risk factors
Ukraine
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
An expert evaluation of identifiability of cardiovascular diseases was carried out together with a clinical and functional examination of certain groups of miners of basic underground occupations at different ages and lengths of service, that showed a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases along with a low informative value of methodical approaches, indices and criteria used for their diagnosis in conducting preliminary and periodic health check-ups. To improve the quality of diagnosis of diseases of the circulatory system it is necessary that standardized methods of investigation should be employed together with consistent indices of high informative value as well as a purposive training of physicians.
PubMed ID
10424067 View in PubMed
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AIDS, hospice and volunteers. The Casey House volunteer program. A case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221690
Source
J Volunt Adm. 1992;10(4):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

Attitudinal problems facing international medical graduates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197000
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Sep 19;163(6):697-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-2000
Author
D R Evangelista
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Sep 19;163(6):697-8
Date
Sep-19-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Emigration and Immigration
Foreign Medical Graduates - supply & distribution
Humans
Licensure, Medical
Personnel Selection - methods
Physicians - psychology
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Sep 7;161(5):561-210497616
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):801-310750470
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):260-110979724
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):801-310750470
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):260-110979724
Comment On: CMAJ. 1999 Sep 7;161(5):561-210497616
PubMed ID
11022582 View in PubMed
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Barriers and facilitators to recruitment of physicians and practices for primary care health services research at one centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138725
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010;10:109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sharon Johnston
Clare Liddy
William Hogg
Melissa Donskov
Grant Russell
Elizabeth Gyorfi-Dyke
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sjohnston@bruyere.org
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010;10:109
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Personnel Selection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Abstract
While some research has been conducted examining recruitment methods to engage physicians and practices in primary care research, further research is needed on recruitment methodology as it remains a recurrent challenge and plays a crucial role in primary care research. This paper reviews recruitment strategies, common challenges, and innovative practices from five recent primary care health services research studies in Ontario, Canada.
We used mixed qualitative and quantitative methods to gather data from investigators and/or project staff from five research teams. Team members were interviewed and asked to fill out a brief survey on recruitment methods, results, and challenges encountered during a recent or ongoing project involving primary care practices or physicians. Data analysis included qualitative analysis of interview notes and descriptive statistics generated for each study.
Recruitment rates varied markedly across the projects despite similar initial strategies. Common challenges and creative solutions were reported by many of the research teams, including building a sampling frame, developing front-office rapport, adapting recruitment strategies, promoting buy-in and interest in the research question, and training a staff recruiter.
Investigators must continue to find effective ways of reaching and involving diverse and representative samples of primary care providers and practices by building personal connections with, and buy-in from, potential participants. Flexible recruitment strategies and an understanding of the needs and interests of potential participants may also facilitate recruitment.
Notes
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Cites: Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):934-79630134
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2004 May 26;2 Suppl 2:S50-415655090
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2004 Dec 21;5(1):3115613246
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Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2007 May;28(3):232-4116996320
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2007 May;28(3):258-6717030154
Cites: J Am Board Fam Med. 2007 Mar-Apr;20(2):220-817341759
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007;7:1517391510
Cites: Fam Pract. 2009 Apr;26(2):128-3619251761
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2009 May;55(5):557-819439712
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2009 Dec;24(4):325-3319819896
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Dec;52(12):1143-5610580777
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2000 Aug;15(8):591-910940152
Cites: J Community Health. 2002 Apr;27(2):79-8911936759
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1997 Feb;47(415):91-49101692
PubMed ID
21144048 View in PubMed
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Challenges to recruit and retain American Indian and Alaskan Natives into social work programs: the impact on the child welfare workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117697
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):31-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Suzanne L Cross
Angelique Day
Lucas J Gogliotti
Justin J Pung
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):31-53
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Welfare - economics - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cultural Competency
Education, Professional - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Personnel Selection - methods - standards
Social Isolation
Social Work - economics - education - manpower
Stereotyping
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
There is a shortage of professionally trained American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) social workers available to provide services including child welfare services to tribal communities. This study used a mixed-model survey design to examine the perceptions of 47 AI/AN BSW and MSW students enrolled in social work programs across the to determine the challenges associated with recruitment and retention. The findings are supported in the literature. Findings indicate that social work academic programs have not made substantial gains in the recruitment and retention of AI/AN students over several decades. Students identified the following seven major barriers to successful recruitment and retention: (1) a lack of AI/AN professors; (2) a shortage of field placement agencies that serve AI/AN clients; (3) conflicts between students' academic obligations and responsibilities to their families and tribal communities; (4) students' feelings of cultural isolation; (5) the need for AI/AN role models and mentors; (6) a lack of understanding by universities of cultural customs and traditional values; and (7) racism. Implications for policy and practice are offered.
PubMed ID
24851474 View in PubMed
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Cultivating rural healthcare professionals: the Norfolk General Hospital Health Science Perspectives Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185479
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;6(2):56-60, 2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Linda Vancso
Robert Foster
E Lisa Moses
Author Affiliation
Education/Library Services, Norfolk General Hospital.
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;6(2):56-60, 2
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Health Manpower
Hospitals, Rural - manpower
Humans
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Personnel Selection - methods
Professional Practice Location
Program Development
Abstract
Studies around the world have shown that where healthcare professionals establish their practices is influenced by where they grow up and receive their training. In our Simcoe, Ontario-based Norfolk General Hospital (NGH), about 40% of our physicians and 80% of other medical health professionals study nearby and return here to their rural roots.
PubMed ID
12737032 View in PubMed
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Decentralized nursing education in Northern Norway: towards a sustainable recruitment and retention model in rural Arctic healthcare services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105928
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente Norbye
Mari Wolff Skaalvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22793
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Norway
Nurses - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - methods - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - manpower
Young Adult
Abstract
Decentralized nursing education (DNE) was established at Tromsø University College in 1990 and has since become a part of the bachelor programme in nursing at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. The objective of the study was to investigate whether and to what degree the first DNE programme established in Norway has contributed to recruitment and retention of registered nurses (RNs) in rural healthcare services.
The quantitative survey took place in 2012. A questionnaire was distributed to 315 former students who had graduated from the DNE programme from 1994 to 2011.
The primary finding of this study is that the DNE successfully recruits students from rural areas of Northern Norway. Nearly, 87.5% have their first employment in community healthcare services. They continued to work in the rural areas and 85% still worked as nurses in 2012. The DNE programme has been successful regarding recruitment and retention of RNs to community healthcare services. Fifty-six percent have attended a variety of postgraduate programmes.
The DNE programme demonstrates itself as a successful study model regarding recruitment and retention of RNs to rural and remote areas.
Notes
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Aug 26;124(16):2107-915334126
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(3):297-30614720247
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2009 Apr-Jun;9(2):106019530891
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2012 Jul;49(7):887-90522019402
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:1-822564460
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2012;12:193722394086
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Dec 4;376(9756):1923-5821112623
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 2010 Jun;18(3):102-920579020
Cites: Med Teach. 2012;34(7):e476-8222746965
Cites: J Contin Educ Nurs. 1989 Mar-Apr;20(2):54-72495304
Cites: Educ Health (Abingdon). 2006 Nov;19(3):385-717178522
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):84518410221
PubMed ID
24286063 View in PubMed
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Evaluating surgical resident selection procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194550
Source
Am J Surg. 2001 Mar;181(3):221-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
M K Gilbart
M D Cusimano
G. Regehr
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Am J Surg. 2001 Mar;181(3):221-5
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Internship and Residency
Orthopedics - education
Personnel Selection - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The purposes of this study were to develop and assess a rating form for selection of surgical residents, determine the criteria most important in selection, determine the reliability of the assessment form and process both within and across sites, and document differences in procedure and structure of resident selection processes across Canada.
Twelve of 13 English-speaking orthopedic surgery training programs in Canada participated during the 1999 selection year. The critical incident technique was utilized to determine the criteria most important in selection. From these criteria a 10-item rating form was developed with each item on a 5-point scale. Sixty-six candidates were invited for interviews across the country. Each interviewer completed one assessment form for each candidate, and independently ranked all candidates at the conclusion of all interviews. Consensus final rank orders were then created for each residency program. Across all programs, pairwise program-by-program correlations for each assessment parameter were made.
The internal consistency of assessment form ratings for each interviewer was moderately high (mean Cronbach's alpha = 0.71). A correlation between each item and the final rank order for each program revealed that the items work ethic, interpersonal qualities, orthopedic experience, and enthusiasm correlated most highly with final candidate rank orders (r = 0.5, 0.48, 0.48, 0.45, respectively). The interrater reliabilities (within panels) and interpanel reliabilities (within programs) for the rank orders were 0.67 and 0.63, respectively. Using the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula, it was found that two panels with two interviewers on each panel are required to obtain a stable measure of a given candidate (reliabilities of 0.80). The average pairwise program-by-program correlations were low for the final candidate rank orders (0.14).
A method was introduced to develop a standard, reliable candidate assessment form to evaluate residency selection procedures. The assessment form ratings were found to be consistent within interviewers. Candidate assessments within programs (both between interviewers and between panels) were moderately reliable suggesting agreement within programs regarding the relative quality of candidates, but there was very little agreement across programs.
PubMed ID
11376575 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing successful physician recruitment in pediatrics and internal medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171732
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(3):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kelvin King
Peter Camfield
Lynn Breau
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University and IWK Health Center.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(3):29-34
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Internal Medicine
Male
Pediatrics
Personnel Selection - methods
Physicians
Schools, Medical
Abstract
The objective of the study was to survey recently hired physicians to Canadian Academic Departments of Pediatric and Internal Medicine to understand the factors that underlay successful recruitment. Recruits and Chairs agreed on the 10 most important values. Chairs overvalued the 10 least important Recruit values. Statistical analysis revealed five core themes - in order of importance they are: family lifestyle and opportunities, compensation methodology, children/community (housing, schools, recreational), professional working conditions (technology, staffing, facilities), and academic opportunities. Core themes varied by demographics and academic profile.
PubMed ID
16323467 View in PubMed
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Finding temporary relief: strategy for nursing recruitment in northern aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178378
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Jun;36(2):148-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mary Ellen Hill
Author Affiliation
Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Jun;36(2):148-63
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Ontario
Personnel Selection - methods
Rural Health Services - manpower
Transcultural Nursing - manpower
Abstract
To address a recurring shortage of nurses in the aboriginal communities of Northwestern Ontario, the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada, commissioned a study to explore the viability of establishing a relief pool among nurses from nearby small industrial towns. An open/close-ended survey completed by a random sample of 237 nurses from the target population documented levels of awareness, willingness, and preparedness for northern practice, as well as recruitment incentives and disincentives. Findings demonstrate an awareness of the overlap between the professional and personal dimensions characteristic of such practices, and suggest support for innovative rotations that would cut across federal/provincial/community jurisdictions. Although complex, given time and willingness, a regional relief system seems viable.
PubMed ID
15369171 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.