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A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Surg. 2013 Jun;56(3):149
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Edward J Harvey
Source
Can J Surg. 2013 Jun;56(3):149
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Female
General Surgery
Humans
Personnel Selection
Sex Factors
Notes
Cites: Can J Surg. 2013 Jun;56(3):153-823484466
Cites: Br Med J. 1969 Jun 21;2(5659):752-45786765
PubMed ID
23706843 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of different approaches to identifying cardiovascular diseases in coal miners during medical selection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49975
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
L N Sizonenko
V V Cherkesov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis
Coal Mining
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis
Personnel Selection - methods
Risk factors
Ukraine
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
An expert evaluation of identifiability of cardiovascular diseases was carried out together with a clinical and functional examination of certain groups of miners of basic underground occupations at different ages and lengths of service, that showed a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases along with a low informative value of methodical approaches, indices and criteria used for their diagnosis in conducting preliminary and periodic health check-ups. To improve the quality of diagnosis of diseases of the circulatory system it is necessary that standardized methods of investigation should be employed together with consistent indices of high informative value as well as a purposive training of physicians.
PubMed ID
10424067 View in PubMed
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Additional skills training for rural physicians. Alberta's rural physician action plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169033
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 May;52:601-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Ron Gorsche
John Hnatuik
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary. john.hnatuik@rpap.ab.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 May;52:601-4
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Family Practice - education - manpower
Humans
Medically underserved area
Personnel Selection
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - manpower
Abstract
Rural physicians in Alberta identified access to special skills training and upgrading skills as an important practice requirement.
The Rural Physician Action Plan in Alberta developed an Enrichment Program to assist physicians practising in rural Alberta communities to upgrade their existing skills or gain new skills. The Enrichment Program aimed to provide a single point of entry to skills training that was individualized and based on the needs of rural physicians.
Two experienced rural physicians were engaged as "skills brokers" to help rural physicians requesting additional skills training or upgrading to find the training they required. Physicians interested in applying for the Enrichment Program consulted one of the brokers. Each applicant was assigned a preceptor. Preceptors confirmed learning objectives with trainees, provided the required training in keeping with agreed-upon learning objectives, and ensured trainees were evaluated at the end of the training.
The program has helped rural physicians upgrade their skills and gain new skills. More Alberta rural physicians are now able to pursue additional training and return to practise new skills in their rural and remote communities than in the past.
Notes
Cites: J Rural Health. 1994 Summer;10(3):183-9210138034
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):351-59484262
PubMed ID
16739833 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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Adiposity in 277 young adult male offspring of women with diabetes compared with controls: a Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125402
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jul;91(7):838-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Gunnar Lauge Nielsen
Claus Dethlefsen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Jan Fog Pedersen
Lars Mølsted-Pedersen
Matt W Gillman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Himmerland Hospital, Farsø, Denmark. guln@rn.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jul;91(7):838-43
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Military Personnel
Personnel Selection
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - drug therapy - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the associations of maternal diabetes, overall and stratified according to treatment of diabetes, with weight-related outcomes at the time of military conscription, at age 18-20 years.
Cohort study of 277 Danish male offspring of mothers with recognized pre-gestational or gestational diabetes. As population-based controls we selected 870 men matched from the Civil Registration Office.
Data on weight-related outcomes were retrieved from the Danish military conscription registry.
Military rejection due to adiposity and body mass index (BMI) at conscription.
Army rejection rate due to adiposity was 5.8% (n= 16) among 277 diabetes mellitus-exposed men compared with 3.1% (n= 27) in 870 controls (risk difference 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.3-5.7)) and mean BMI at conscription was 1.4 kg/m(2) (95%CI 0.8-2.0) higher among those diabetes mellitus-exposed men. In analyses adjusted for birthweight and gestational age, compared with controls, the BMI was 0.6 kg/m(2) (95%CI -0.3-1.5) higher in sons of mothers with pre-gestational and 2.7 kg/m(2) (95% (CI): 0.9-4.5) higher with gestational diabetes. The greatest BMI difference was in offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes in whom insulin was initiated during pregnancy. We found no difference in conscript height.
Compared with controls, male offspring of women with diabetes had a higher rejection rate due to adiposity and higher adult BMI. Subgroup analyses showed that the association was most pronounced in sons of mothers with gestational diabetes, whereas pre-gestational diabetes was only weakly associated with higher offspring BMI.
PubMed ID
22486385 View in PubMed
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[Adolescent health status and the medical problems of recruiting for the Armed Forces of Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75095
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jul-Aug;(7-8):7-8
Publication Type
Article

394 records – page 1 of 40.