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259 records – page 1 of 26.

Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Feb 24;88(8):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1988
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 May 6;72(8):24-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-1985

[6-hour workday--consequences for nursing services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238956
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Apr 3;72(7):18-21, 34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-1985

[24-hour duty a way to solve the nursing shortage. An open job with a lot of responsibility. Interview by Monika Trozell].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232648
Source
Vardfacket. 1988 Aug 11;12(13-14):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-1988

[A cry from long-term care: understaffing kills us].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242820
Source
Vardfacket. 1982 Oct 10;6(18):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1982

The ageing of the nursing workforce: what lies ahead and what we can do.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107930
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2013 Sep;60(3):277-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013

Ageism, age relations, and garment industry work in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195607
Source
Gerontologist. 2001 Feb;41(1):111-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J A McMullin
V W Marshall
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. mcmullin@julian.uwo.ca
Source
Gerontologist. 2001 Feb;41(1):111-22
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Industry - economics - manpower
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Management
Prejudice
Quebec
Retirement
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Sex Factors
Stereotyping
Abstract
This study examined the complexities of age relations at work. Garment workers believed that their fate was linked to ageism and that their work experience was discounted by management. Managers wanted to be rid of older workers because they commanded higher wages than younger workers. The issue was cost reduction, and age was implicated unintendedly. Still, managers seemed to use stereotypical images to discourage older workers and they did not organize work routines to facilitate the adaptation of them. Instead, they subcontracted the easy jobs, relying on the experience of the older employees for difficult work while not adapting the workplace. Theoretically, the authors argue that ageism and age discrimination can best be understood through a recognition of the importance of structured age relations and human agency.
PubMed ID
11220808 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis and ways of improving the organization of activities of sector physicians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231574
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(5):15-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A G Kononov
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(5):15-7
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Hospitals - manpower
Hospitals, Urban - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Medically underserved area
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - manpower - organization & administration
Personnel Management - standards
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - standards
Siberia
Abstract
Proceeding from the analysis of the organization of reception of patients in 4 city polyclinics having 104 therapeutic sectors, the study demonstrated decrease of the amount and breach of continuity of medical care rendered to the residents of the sectors where doctors were absent during the reception. It was proposed to appraise and monitor the work of sector physicians during their reception of patients through a complex indicator of intensity of consultation rates at other medical sectors. The introduced system of extra payment of physicians and paramedical staff for reception of patients from other sectors where the sector physician was absent could raise continuity of care and eliminate patients' complaints and discontent of medical workers.
PubMed ID
2740934 View in PubMed
Less detail

259 records – page 1 of 26.