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Aligning career development with organizational goals: working towards the development of a strong and sustainable workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152039
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite
Sandra Carlton
Brenda Bass
Author Affiliation
Programs and Chief Nursing Officer, Providence Care, Kingston, ON, Canada. saxebram@providencecare.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Personnel - education - trends
Health Promotion - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Pilot Projects
Social Change
Staff Development - trends
Abstract
The rapidly changing world of healthcare is faced with many challenges, not the least of which is a diminishing workforce. Healthcare organizations must develop multiple strategies, not only to attract and retain employees, but also to ensure that workers are prepared for continuous change in the workplace, are working at their full scope of practice and are committed to, and accountable for, the provision of high-quality care. There is evidence that by creating a healthier workplace, improved patient care will follow. Aligning Healthy Workplace Initiatives with an organization's strategic goals, corporate culture and vision reinforces their importance within the organization. In this paper, we describe an innovative pilot to assess a career development program, one of multiple Healthy Workplace Initiatives taking place at Providence Care in Kingston, Ontario in support of our three strategic goals. The results of the pilot were very encouraging; subsequent success in obtaining funding from HealthForceOntario has allowed the implementation of a sustainable program of career development within the organization. More work is required to evaluate its long-term effectiveness.
PubMed ID
19289913 View in PubMed
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Anger-provoking events and intention to turnover in hospital administrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143917
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(1):45-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Karen Harlos
Author Affiliation
Department of Business and Administration, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada. ka.harlos@uwinnipeg.ca
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(1):45-56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anger
Canada
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Hospital Administrators - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine anger associated with types of negative work events experienced by health administrators and to examine the impact of anger on intent to leave.
Textual data analysis is used to measure anger in open-ended survey responses from administrative staff of a Canadian hospital. Multivariate regression is applied to predict anger from event type, on the one hand, and turnover intentions from anger, on the other.
Person-related negative events contributed to administrator anger more than policy-related events. Anger from events predicted turnover intentions after adjusting for numerous potential confounds.
Future studies using larger samples across multiple sites are needed to test the generalizability of results.
Results provide useful information for retention strategies through codifying respect and fairness in interactions and policies. Health organizations stand to gain efficiencies by helping administrators handle anger effectively, leading to more stable staffing levels and more pleasurable, productive work environments.
This paper addresses gaps in knowledge about determinants of turnover in this population by examining the impact of administrator anger on intent to leave and the work events which give rise to anger. Given the strategic importance of health administration work and the high costs to health organizations when administrators leave, results hold particular promise for health human resources.
PubMed ID
20429408 View in PubMed
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Antecedents of role conflict in compliance-enhancing organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97705
Source
Psychol Rep. 2009 Dec;105(3 Pt 2):1113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Rudi Kirkhaug
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. rudi.kirkhaug@uit.no
Source
Psychol Rep. 2009 Dec;105(3 Pt 2):1113-25
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Control - psychology
Coercion
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Norway
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Police
Questionnaires
Role
Safety Management
Social Conformity
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Compliance-enhancing organizations such as the military and police are characterized by guiding and controlling employees, and they increasingly tend to control and restrict employees' behavior when exposed to external uncertainty. Restrictions on employees' behavior are intended to increase efficiency, safety, and combat readiness through reducing misunderstandings and conflicts. However, many writers have argued that the most natural reaction to external unpredictability and uncertainty is internal flexibility and utilizing the entire range of employees' qualifications. The question raised in this study is whether restrictions imply that employees feel they are subject to incompatible work conditions and are deprived of resources and opportunities to execute their everyday responsibilities and thereby experience role conflict. Hierarchical regression analyses performed on data from 71 police and 71 army officers showed that rules and routines that were perceived as restrictive or coercive better explained role conflict among employees than either leadership loyalty, commitment, and rules or routines that were perceived as enabling.
PubMed ID
20229915 View in PubMed
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The association between poor organizational climate and high work commitments, and sickness absence in a general population of women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138918
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Dec;52(12):1179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kristina Holmgren
Gunnel Hensing
Lotta Dellve
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. kristina.holmgren@neuro.gu.se
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Dec;52(12):1179-85
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Personnel Loyalty
Sick Leave - trends
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the association between organizational climate and work commitment, and sickness absence in a general population of workers and consecutively selected employed sick-listed.
Questionnaire data used in this cross-sectional study consisted of two cohorts: (1) randomly selected individuals in a general working population cohort (2763) and (2) consecutively selected employed sick-listed cohort (3044) for more than 14 days over 2 months.
Poor organizational climate was associated with increased odds of belonging to the employed sick-listed cohort among both women and men, while high work commitments were associated with increased odds only among women. The increased adjusted odds ratio for the combinations of poor organizational climate and high work commitment was 1.80 (confidence interval 1.36 to 2.37) among women and 2.74 (confidence interval 1.84 to 4.08) among men.
These results support the magnitude of combining organizational climate and work commitment.
PubMed ID
21124245 View in PubMed
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The association of distress and sleeping problems with physicians' intentions to change profession: the moderating effect of job control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147879
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Anne Kouvonen
Jukka Vänskä
Hannu Halila
Timo Sinervo
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Mobility
Female
Finland
Humans
Intention
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The present study examined whether job control moderated the association between stress indicators (distress and sleeping problems) and intentions to change profession among 2,650 Finnish physicians. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was applied. The authors found that high levels of distress and sleeping problems were associated with higher levels of intentions to change profession, whereas high job control was associated with lower levels of intentions to change profession even after adjusting for the effects of gender, age, and employment sector. In addition, high job control was able to mitigate the positive association that distress and sleeping problems had with intentions to change profession. Our findings highlight the importance of offering more job control to physicians to prevent unnecessary physician turnover.
PubMed ID
19839657 View in PubMed
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Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007): implication for the long term care sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123968
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:133
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Michel D Landry
Robyn Hastie
Känecy Oñate
Brenda Gamble
Raisa B Deber
Molly C Verrier
Author Affiliation
Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, Duke University Medical Centre, Box 104002, Durham, North Carolina, USA. mike.landry@duke.edu
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:133
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment - trends
Humans
Long-Term Care - manpower
Longitudinal Studies
Ontario
Personnel Loyalty
Personnel Selection
Physical Therapists
Abstract
Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs) in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year.
A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007) was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as 'hospital', 'community', 'long term care' (LTC) or 'other.' Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed.
There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%.
Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22643111 View in PubMed
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Balancing involvement: employees' experiences of merging hospitals in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191022
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Apr;38(1):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Agneta Kullén Engström
Kristina Rosengren
Lillemor R-M Hallberg
Author Affiliation
Quality Controller, The Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden. agneta.kullen_engstrom@vgregion.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Apr;38(1):11-8
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Facility Merger - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Job Satisfaction
Personnel Loyalty
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The health care of today stands in front of demands on financial and structural changes. New technology and global economy are forces driving on the change process.
The aim of this study is to describe and broaden the understanding of the employees' experience of being involved in a merger between two health care districts in Sweden.
This study was carried out from a qualitative approach according to the grounded theory tradition. From a theme guide with specific questions, 31 interviews were carried out with employees working in the health care.
Five categories emerged from the body of interviews: balancing involvement, trust respect, challenge and commitment. Balancing involvement was defined as an overall core category related to the other categories. The categories trust, respect, challenge and commitment were related to subcategories and affected the core category balancing involvement.
The overall findings point to the importance of balancing the employees' involvement in order to reach goal fulfilment change in a merger process.
PubMed ID
11895526 View in PubMed
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The behavioural outcomes of quality improvement teams: the role of team success and team identification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195949
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2000 May;13(2):78-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
D M Irvine
P. Leatt
M G Evans
G R Baker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. d.irvine@UTORONTO.CA
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2000 May;13(2):78-89
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Community - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Management Quality Circles
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Loyalty
Power (Psychology)
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
This study investigates the relationship between hospital quality improvement (QI) team success and changes in empowerment, 'organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour' (OCB) and job behaviour related to QI. Data were collected from administrative staff, healthcare professionals and support staff from four community hospitals. The study involved a field investigation with two data collection points. Structured questionnaires and interviews with hospital management were used to collect data on the study variables. High scores were observed for organizational commitment, OCB and job behaviour related to QI when individuals identified with teams that were successful. Low scores were observed when individuals identified with teams that were unsuccessful. Empowerment was positively related to job behaviour associated with QI. It is concluded that participation on QI teams can lead to organizational learning, resulting in the inculcation of positive 'extra-role' and 'in-role' job behaviour.
PubMed ID
11184012 View in PubMed
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Care in the country: a historical case study of long-term sustainability in 4 rural health centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149620
Source
Am J Public Health. 2009 Sep;99(9):1612-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
D Brad Wright
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. bradwright@unc.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2009 Sep;99(9):1612-8
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community Networks - organization & administration
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Kentucky
Louisiana
New Mexico
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Loyalty
Physician's Role
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Rural health services - organization & administration
Tennessee
Abstract
From 1978 to 1983, researchers at the University of North Carolina conducted a National Evaluation of Rural Primary Care Programs. Thirty years later, many of the programs they studied have closed, but the challenges of providing rural health care have persisted. I explored the histories of 4 surviving rural primary care programs and identified factors that contributed to their sustainability. These included physician advocates, innovative practices, organizational flexibility, and community integration. As rural health programs look ahead, identifying future generations of physician advocates is a crucial next step in developing the rural primary care workforce. It is also important for these programs to find ways to cope with high rates of staff turnover.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19608960 View in PubMed
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Care-managers' professional choices: ethical dilemmas and conflicting expectations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291570
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Sep 07; 17(1):630
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-07-2017
Author
Siri Tønnessen
Gøril Ursin
Berit Støre Brinchmann
Author Affiliation
University College of Southeast Norway, Campus Vestfold, 3603, Kongsberg, Norway.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Sep 07; 17(1):630
Date
Sep-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Case Managers - ethics
Choice Behavior - ethics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Norway
Personnel Loyalty
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Care-managers are responsible for the public administration of individual healthcare decisions and decide on the volume and content of community healthcare services given to a population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conflicting expectations and ethical dilemmas these professionals encounter in their daily work with patients and to discuss the clinical implications of this.
The study had a qualitative design. The data consisted of verbatim transcripts from 12 ethical reflection group meetings held in 2012 at a purchaser unit in a Norwegian city. The participants consist of healthcare professionals such as nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and social workers. The analyses and interpretation were conducted according to a hermeneutic methodology. This study is part of a larger research project.
Two main themes emerged through the analyses: 1. Professional autonomy and loyalty, and related subthemes: loyalty to whom/what, overruling of decisions, trust and obligation to report. 2. Boundaries of involvement and subthemes: private or professional, care-manager or provider and accessibility.
Underlying values and a model illustrating the dimensions of professional responsibility in the care-manager role are suggested. The study implies that when allocating services, healthcare professionals need to find a balance between responsibility and accountability in their role as care-managers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28882150 View in PubMed
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77 records – page 1 of 8.