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106 records – page 1 of 11.

Acute response to rape--a PTSD variant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231718
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1989;355:56-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
S. Dahl
Author Affiliation
Division for Disaster Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Gaustad.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1989;355:56-62
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Arousal
Crisis Intervention
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality Tests
Rape - psychology
Somatoform Disorders - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Abstract
The relationship between the acute response to rape and the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was studied in 55 victims of rape and attempted rape during the first two weeks after the assault. The results show that in the majority of victims the response to rape within the first two weeks displays the symptoms of PTSD, although the criterion of duration is not fulfilled. Specific features of the response to rape, like shame, guilt and suicidal ideation are discussed. The importance of early detection to enable the administration of adequate treatment is emphasized and suggestions for further research are offered.
PubMed ID
2624135 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related expectancies for self and others reported by alcoholic men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12041
Source
Psychol Rep. 1991 Apr;68(2):555-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
R. Gustafson
C. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Rep. 1991 Apr;68(2):555-62
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Ambulatory Care
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Personality Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Set (Psychology)
Abstract
A questionnaire used by Rohsenow in 1983 was administered to 87 alcoholic men and women taking part in rehabilitation programs at local Swedish outpatient rehabilitation clinics. The purpose was to explore their alcohol-related expectancies for themselves and for others and to compare these with the results from other similar studies in other cultures. The answers, scored according to Rohsenow's eight factors, indicated that alcoholics expected larger positive and negative effects for others than for themselves. This discrepancy was slightly modified by such variables as sex, age, and drinking habits. Alcoholics in Sweden seem to have alcohol-related expectancies similar to those of social drinkers both in Sweden and in other Western countries.
PubMed ID
1862188 View in PubMed
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Alprazolam, imipramine and placebo treatment of panic disorder: predicting therapeutic response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227303
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1991;365:46-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
R. Rosenberg
P. Bech
M. Mellergård
J O Ottosson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1991;365:46-52
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alprazolam - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Imipramine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Panic - drug effects
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Psychopathology
Scandinavia
Social Environment
Abstract
Factors that predicted the outcome of drug treatment (alprazolam or imipramine) of panic disorder were studied in a sample of 123 Scandinavian patients participating in a multicenter placebo-controlled 8-week trial. The attrition rate was 95% for alprazolam, 73% for imipramine and 46% for placebo. For the intention-to-treat and 3-week-completer samples, drugs and anxiety symptoms at baseline were the best predictors of improvement on the Global Improvement Scale and on symptom scales focusing on panic attacks, phobic behavior and anticipatory anxiety. For completers of the 8-week trial, only baseline scores predicted outcome. Generally, more severe symptoms at baseline predicted a worse outcome. A subsample of patients had a marked placebo response. Avoidance, sex, age, childhood psychopathology and previous treatment experience had no or only a weak impact on the outcome. The relationship between panic disorder and mood disorder is presented elsewhere.
PubMed ID
1862734 View in PubMed
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Androgen receptor trinucleotide repeat polymorphism and personality traits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194311
Source
Psychiatr Genet. 2001 Mar;11(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
E G Jönsson
C. von Gertten
J P Gustavsson
Q P Yuan
K. Lindblad-Toh
K. Forslund
G. Rylander
M. Mattila-Evenden
M. Asberg
M. Schalling
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. erikj@psyk.ks.se
Source
Psychiatr Genet. 2001 Mar;11(1):19-23
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aggression
Alleles
Dominance-Subordination
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality - genetics
Personality Tests
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Receptors, Androgen - genetics
Sweden
Trinucleotide Repeats
Abstract
Human family and twin studies have established considerable heritable components influencing individual differences in personality traits as assessed by self-report questionnaires. We have investigated a trinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene and personality traits. Healthy Swedish subjects (n = 335) were assessed with the Karolinska Scales of Personality inventory. There were tendencies (P > or = 0.006) in some scales indicating possible relationships between the androgen receptor allele length and personality traits related to dominance and aggression. However, after correction for multiple testing, no significant differences were found. We conclude that no significant association could be found between the androgen receptor polymorphism investigated and any personality trait, although the tendencies found are worthwhile subjects for replication attempts.
PubMed ID
11409695 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of REM latency and psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46638
Source
J Affect Disord. 1991 Nov;23(3):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
H G Lund
P. Bech
L. Eplov
P. Jennum
G. Wildschiødtz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1991 Nov;23(3):107-12
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep, REM
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In an epidemiological population study 87 subjects were studied with home sleep recordings. Nineteen subjects had minor psychiatric disorders: six subjects had a minor depression, six subjects had a generalized anxiety disorder, and seven subjects had a mild vegetative discomfort syndrome. Syndrome profiles of the three groups, using the AMDP system, showed a significantly higher degree of insomnia in the anxiety group than in the depressive group. The mean rapid eye movement (REM) latency in the anxiety group was significantly longer than in the other groups, including normals. The study showed a slight tendency towards a reduced REM latency in the minor depressives, but no statistical significance was obtained.
PubMed ID
1774425 View in PubMed
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An inverse relationship between typical alcohol consumption and facial symmetry detection ability in young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165443
Source
J Psychopharmacol. 2007 Jul;21(5):507-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Kirsten A Oinonen
Roxanne Sterniczuk
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. koinonen@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Psychopharmacol. 2007 Jul;21(5):507-18
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System - epidemiology - psychology
Central Nervous System Depressants - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - adverse effects
Face
Female
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Pattern Recognition, Visual - drug effects
Pedigree
Personality Tests
Questionnaires
Students - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
The relationship between monthly alcohol consumption over the past 6 months and facial symmetry perception ability was examined in young sober women with typical college-age drinking patterns. Facial symmetry detection performance was inversely related to typical monthly alcohol consumption, r (41) = -0.57, p
PubMed ID
17259210 View in PubMed
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Asthma, ear problems, and dental anxiety among 6- to 8-yr-olds in Denmark: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15217
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2003 Dec;111(6):472-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Pia Wogelius
Sven Poulsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Oral Health and Pediatric Dentistry, Dental School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2003 Dec;111(6):472-6
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Dental Care for Children - psychology
Dental Health Surveys
Humans
Otitis - epidemiology
Personality Tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the association between asthma, ear problems, and dental anxiety in children in a population-based cross-sectional study. The population included four municipalities in the County of North Jutland, Denmark, in 2001. A total of 1235 children aged 6-8 yr, and their parents, were identified. Data were obtained from a prescription database, from parental-answered questionnaires, and from dental records. Children with asthma were defined as children that had received prescriptions for both inhaled beta2-agonists and corticosteroids during the past year. Data on ear problems and dental anxiety were obtained from the questionnaires. Dental anxiety was measured using the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS). Use of asthma-drugs was associated with dental anxiety (odds ratio = 1.70; 95% confidence interval 0.90-3.22). A history of often ear problems was also associated with dental anxiety (odds ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval 1.20-2.80). It is concluded that asthma and ear problems may be risk factors for dental anxiety in children.
PubMed ID
14632682 View in PubMed
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Behavior in term, small for gestational age preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31927
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2001 Dec;65(2):107-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K. Sommerfelt
H W Andersson
K. Sonnander
G. Ahlsten
B. Ellertsen
T. Markestad
G. Jacobsen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Bergen, Barneklinikken, 5021 Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2001 Dec;65(2):107-21
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Behavior
Norway - epidemiology
Personality Tests
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate whether being born small for gestational age (SGA) was associated with an increased frequency of preschool behavioral problems. STUDY DESIGN: Follow-up study at 5 years of age. SUBJECTS: A population based cohort of 318 term infants who were SGA, defined as having a birthweight less than the 15th percentile for gestational age, and without major handicap such as cerebral palsy or mental retardation, and a random control sample of 307 appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Personality Inventory for Children and the Yale Children's Inventory (completed by the mothers), and child behavior during psychometric testing. RESULTS: Behavior problems was not more common among the SGA children. The results were not confounded by a wide range of parental demographic and child rearing factors, including maternal non-verbal problem solving abilities, child rearing style, and maternal psychological distress. However, the parental factors explained 13% of the variance in a summary score of child behavior compared to 1% explained by SGA vs. AGA status. The SGA children were not more sensitive to the negative impacts of parental risk factors than AGA controls. The study does not address the outcome of severely growth-retarded SGA infants. CONCLUSION: Being born moderately SGA is not a significant risk factor for preschool behavior problems.
PubMed ID
11641032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Borderline traits among community alcoholics and problem-drinkers: rural-urban differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229841
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;34(8):796-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
M. Tousignant
V. Kovess
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de recherche en écologie humaine et sociale, Université du Québec à Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;34(8):796-9
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narcissism
Personality Tests
Quebec
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
This study analyzed the borderline traits of a sample of community alcoholics drawn from a rural and a metropolitan area of the province of Quebec. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule and other questions from the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines were administered. About one-third of the sample of alcoholics showed a high number of borderline traits, a proportion similar to that found in institutionalized samples elsewhere. The borderline alcoholics tended to be younger and they all came from the urban area. This result suggests that alcoholics are probably better tolerated in rural areas and are less likely to adopt a pathological behaviour.
PubMed ID
2819644 View in PubMed
Less detail

A brief type-A scale and the occurrence of cardiovascular symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235988
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1987;19(3):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Järvikoski
K. Härkäpää
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Foundation, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1987;19(3):115-20
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angina Pectoris - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Tests
Type A Personality
Abstract
A short Type-A behaviour pattern scale was tested on 3,221 Finnish state employees (65% men, mean age 38.7 years, and 22% with at least college-level vocational education). The Type-A sum score varied with age, sex and work status, but not with basic education. Respondents were further assigned to two extreme groups according to the Type-A sum score: the Type A's in the highest and -B's in the lowest quartile. Of those aged 40 years or more (n = 1,460), the persons with the Type-A behaviour pattern reported typical severe angina pectoris symptoms more frequently than the Type B's. There were no differences, however, in the frequency of typical mild angina pectoris symptoms between the Type A's and B's. The Type-A and -B men differed significantly in the frequency of a previous severe chest pain attack suggesting a possible myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
3441773 View in PubMed
Less detail

106 records – page 1 of 11.