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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Affect regulation and psychopathology in women with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118764
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rune Andersen
Nina Timmerby
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Forskningsenhed, Region Sjælland, Roskilde, Denmark. runan@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - etiology
Aggression - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - etiology
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychopathology
Self Report
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology
Translating
Abstract
Dysfunction in affect regulation is a prominent feature that grossly impairs behavioural and interpersonal domains of experience and underlies a great deal of the psychopathology in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, no study has yet been published that evaluates the psychometric properties of the translated Danish version of self-report measures sensitive to the different aspects and dimensions of dysfunction in affect regulation prevalent in BPD.
This study comprised a group of women diagnosed with BPD (n = 29) and a comparison group of healthy subjects (n = 29) who reported psychopathology and levels of affective instability, aggression, impulsivity and alexithymia by self-report measures.
Our results demonstrated that women with BPD have significant psychopathology and report significantly higher levels of dysfunction in separate components of affect regulation by self-report measures than the comparison group of healthy subjects. Our results also provided partial support for the psychometric appropriateness and clinical relevance of the translated Danish version of affect regulation measures.
The normative reference range indicated by our results makes the measures useful as a practical assessment tool.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
23171744 View in PubMed
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French-language validation of the DACL and MAACL-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220413
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1993 Sep;49(5):685-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
A C Beckingham
G. Coutu-Wakulczyk
B. Lubin
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1993 Sep;49(5):685-95
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Translations
Abstract
The objective of this methodological pilot study was to make a contribution to the French-language validation of the Depressive Adjective Check List (DACL) Set 2 of Forms, E, F, G trait version (Lubin, 1981) and to that of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (MAACL-R; Zuckerman & Lubin, 1985). The importance of the study was to validate the French-language translation of these instruments to assess nonclinical depression or dysphoria and affect in two French- and English-speaking convenience sample groups. The Check Lists were administered to 183 Canadian subjects 60 years of age and over of both sexes from rural areas in the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Canada. In order to ensure that the words chosen carried the same connotation as in the English language, a translation-retranslation technique was used. The data collected from this study suggest that the DACL Form G would be most valid to use with either language and/or site in the protocol for future studies.
PubMed ID
8254076 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties and norm data of the Swedish version of the NEO-PI-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138464
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;65(5):311-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Håkan Källmen
Peter Wennberg
Hans Bergman
Author Affiliation
STAD-Centre for Psychiatry Research Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm County Council, Box 6031, 102 31 Stockholm, Sweden. hakan.kallmen@sll.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;65(5):311-4
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Assessment
Personality Disorders - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - instrumentation - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Internationally, the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R) is a well established questionnaire for assessment of personality in accordance with the Five Factor Model. The instrument has been translated into many languages including Swedish.
The aim of this study was to make a psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of NEO-PI-R based on a sample from the general population.
Postal questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 1250 persons (n = 766 responders).
The test showed satisfactory internal consistency in the broad factors as well as the facets. A factor analysis indicated that the factors were similar but not identical to those obtained in American studies. In sum, The Swedish version of the NEO-PI-R shows satisfactory psychometric properties and the instrument will continue to be a valuable tool in psychological research and in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
21174492 View in PubMed
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Responses to the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire in different seasons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46139
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;158(2):316-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
E. Lund
V. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. eiliv.lund@ism.uit.no
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;158(2):316-8
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Photoperiod
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Seasons
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study investigated whether results on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire, which is used for diagnosis of seasonal affective disorder, differed by the season in which the questionnaire was completed. METHOD: Every third month from March 1997 to February 1998, a population-based panel of 200 men and women age 27-72 years in Gamvik, northern Norway, completed a standardized questionnaire that included all items from the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. RESULTS: The average score for seasonal affective disorder changed over the year. The difference between the highest score, in March, and the lowest, in September, was 8.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Results on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire varied by season, but did not vary by seasonal differences in the amount of daylight.
PubMed ID
11156820 View in PubMed
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The Swedish Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory: psychometrics and clinical correlates from a DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131109
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Rachel E Maddux
Lars-Gunnar Lundh
Martin Bäckström
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Rachel.Maddux@psychology.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):167-77
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Dysthymic Disorder
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Disorders - diagnosis
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Depressive personality is commonly seen in clinical practice, and today only one exclusive self-report instrument-the Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI)-is available for its assessment based on the DSM-IV description of the construct.
The purpose of this research was to evaluate a Swedish version of this measure (DPDI-Swe) in terms of its reliability, internal structure, and convergent validity using related variables from the DSM-IV criteria for depressive personality disorder (DPD) and the proposed DPD trait set for DSM-5.
A non-clinical sample of 255 adults in southern Sweden completed a self-report package, which, in addition to DPD, included the assessment of self-esteem, optimism, hope, rumination, worry, depression, and anxiety. Quality of life was also measured.
Results indicated that the DPDI-Swe was internally consistent (a = 0.96). Exploratory factor analysis with oblique rotation yielded three components, together accounting for 48.21% of the variance in DPDI-Swe scores. There were strong positive associations between the DPDI-Swe and measures of depression, anxiety, rumination, and worry, and strong negative associations between the DPDI-Swe and measures of self-esteem, optimism, hope, and quality of life. These significant relationships remained, albeit slightly diminished, after statistically controlling for current depressed mood.
The DPDI-Swe appears to be a reliable and valid measure of DPD, and it is available for clinical and research use.
PubMed ID
21936730 View in PubMed
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Swedish normative data on personality using the Temperament and Character Inventory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205549
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1998 May-Jun;39(3):122-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Brändström
P. Schlette
T R Przybeck
M. Lundberg
T. Forsgren
S. Sigvardsson
P O Nylander
L G Nilsson
R C Cloninger
R. Adolfsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1998 May-Jun;39(3):122-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality - classification
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Temperament - classification
Translating
Abstract
The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) is a self-report personality questionnaire based on Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality, which accounts for both normal and abnormal variation in the two major components of personality, temperament and character. Normative data for the Swedish TCI based on a representative Swedish sample of 1,300 adults are presented, and the psychometric properties of the questionnaire are discussed. The structure of the Swedish version replicates the American version well for the means, distribution of scores, and relationships within the between scales and subscales. Further, the Swedish inventory had a reliable factor structure and test-retest performance. The results of this study confirm the theory of temperament and character as a seven-factor model of personality.
PubMed ID
9606577 View in PubMed
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A validation and short form of the Basic Character Inventory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158203
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Torsten B Neilands
David H Silvera
Judith A Perry
Astrid Richardsen
Arne Holte
Author Affiliation
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0886, 50 Beale Street, Suite 1300, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA. tor@ucsf.edu
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):161-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Character
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality - physiology
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - methods - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Students - psychology
Abstract
The Basic Character Inventory (BCI) contains 136 items, 17 lower-order personality factors and three higher-order personality factors derived from psychoanalytic theory: Oral, Obsessive Compulsion, and Hysteria. Previous research that investigated the BCI's psychometric properties examined small, special populations and did not use modern statistical methods to validate the BCI. The present study validates the BCI via confirmatory factor analyses using a large sample of 6,285 Norwegian nursing and teaching students. Reliability, convergent validity, and divergent validity of the BCI were also assessed. Results indicated general support for the original BCI factor structure in a reduced form of the BCI that possesses strong reliability and validity, and is suitable for use in time-limited measurement settings.
PubMed ID
18352986 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.