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Personality traits in established schizophrenia: aspects of usability and differences between patients and controls using the Swedish universities Scales of Personality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278088
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;70(6):462-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Tomas Fagerberg
Erik Söderman
J Petter Gustavsson
Ingrid Agartz
Erik G Jönsson
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;70(6):462-9
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Assessment - standards
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Universities
Abstract
Personality is considered as an important aspect that can affect symptoms and social function in persons with schizophrenia. The personality questionnaire Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) has not previously been used in psychotic disorder.
To investigate if SSP has a similar internal consistency and factor structure in a psychosis population as among healthy controls and if patients with psychotic disorders differ from non-psychotic individuals in their responses to the SSP.
Patients with psychotic disorders (n?=?107) and healthy controls (n?=?119) completed SSP. SSP scores were analyzed for internal consistency and case-control differences by Cronbach's alfa and multiple analysis of covariance, respectively.
Internal consistencies among patients were overall similar to that of controls. The patients scored significantly higher in seven (Somatic trait anxiety, Psychic trait anxiety, Stress susceptibility, Lack of assertiveness, Detachment, Embitterment, Mistrust) and lower in three (Physical trait aggression, Verbal trait aggression, Adventure seeking) of the 13 scales of the inventory. In three scales (Impulsiveness, Social desirability and Trait irritability) there was no significant difference between the scoring of patients and healthy controls.
The reliability estimates suggest that SSP can be used by patients with psychotic disorders in stable remission. Patients score higher on neuroticism-related scales and lower on aggression-related scales than controls, which is in accordance with earlier studies where other personality inventories were used.
PubMed ID
27103375 View in PubMed
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The problem of structural indeterminacy in multidimensional symptom report instruments. The case of SCL-90-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52573
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Jul;37(7):685-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
O. Vassend
A. Skrondal
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, Oslo, Norway. ovassend@odont.uio.no
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Jul;37(7):685-701
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The factor structure of SCL-90-R items and scales was analyzed using both exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results of CFA studies at the item-level failed to support the original nine-factor model, as well as several alternative models and EFA suggested very different dimensionality, depending on which criteria were used. Analyses at the scale-level (i.e. the nine original symptom dimensions) suggested that a one- or two-factor model was satisfactory according to descriptive goodness of fit criteria. However, using the likelihood ratio test, specification of four factors was necessary to avoid rejection. According to the likelihood ratio test in a multi-group analysis, a lack of factorial invariance across gender was indicated. Moreover, the factorial structure of the instrument was clearly different across levels of negative affectivity (NA); the dimensionality was substantially higher in the low-NA group as compared to the high-NA group. It is concluded that we are confronted with a profound structural indeterminacy problem and that factor analytic methods and model acceptance criteria alone are insufficient to solve this problem. The indeterminacy problem can be accounted for, at least in part, by the complex logical-semantical structure of SCL-90-R items and scales and the role of the NA trait as a structure generating factor.
PubMed ID
10402693 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties and norm data of the Swedish version of the NEO-PI-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138464
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;65(5):311-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Håkan Källmen
Peter Wennberg
Hans Bergman
Author Affiliation
STAD-Centre for Psychiatry Research Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm County Council, Box 6031, 102 31 Stockholm, Sweden. hakan.kallmen@sll.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;65(5):311-4
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Assessment
Personality Disorders - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - instrumentation - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Internationally, the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R) is a well established questionnaire for assessment of personality in accordance with the Five Factor Model. The instrument has been translated into many languages including Swedish.
The aim of this study was to make a psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of NEO-PI-R based on a sample from the general population.
Postal questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 1250 persons (n = 766 responders).
The test showed satisfactory internal consistency in the broad factors as well as the facets. A factor analysis indicated that the factors were similar but not identical to those obtained in American studies. In sum, The Swedish version of the NEO-PI-R shows satisfactory psychometric properties and the instrument will continue to be a valuable tool in psychological research and in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
21174492 View in PubMed
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Psychometric testing of the Leadership and Management Inventory: a tool to measure the skills and abilities of first-line nurse managers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154160
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Oct;16(7):784-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Bernice Skytt
Marianne Carlsson
Birgitta Ljunggren
Maria Engström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University, Sweden. beeskt@hig.se
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Oct;16(7):784-94
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Employee Performance Appraisal - methods - standards
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Leadership
Nurse Administrators - education - psychology - standards
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Personality Inventory - standards
Politics
Principal Component Analysis
Professional Competence - standards
Psychometrics
Self Efficacy
Self-Assessment
Sweden
Abstract
To estimate the validity and reliability of the Leadership and Management Inventory, a tool to measure the skills and abilities of first-line nurse managers.
The decision to develop an inventory reflects the need for an instrument that can measure the various skills and abilities first-line nurse managers should possess.
Factor analysis was conducted and internal consistency initially estimated on data from 149 registered nurses; a second sample of 197 health care personnel was used to test these results.
Principal component analysis of the first sample resulted in a preferred three-factor solution that explained 65.8% of the variance; Cronbach's alpha coefficient varied between 0.90 and 0.95. Analysis of the second sample also resulted in a three-factor solution that explained 64.2% of the variance; Cronbach's alpha coefficient varied from 0.88 to 0.96. For both samples, the factors were labelled 'interpersonal skills and group management', 'achievement orientation' and 'overall organizational view and political savvy'.
Results indicate that estimates of validity and reliability for the Leadership and Management Inventory can be considered acceptable.
The Leadership and Management Inventory can be used when first-line nurse managers' leadership and management skills and abilities are to be measured.
PubMed ID
19017240 View in PubMed
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Quantitative analysis of organizational culture in occupational health research: a theory-based validation in 30 workplaces of the organizational culture profile instrument.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114168
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:443
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alain Marchand
Victor Y Haines
Julie Dextras-Gauthier
Author Affiliation
School of Industrial Relations, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. alain.marchand@umontreal.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:443
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Culture
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Values
Workplace - classification - psychology
Abstract
This study advances a measurement approach for the study of organizational culture in population-based occupational health research, and tests how different organizational culture types are associated with psychological distress, depression, emotional exhaustion, and well-being.
Data were collected over a sample of 1,164 employees nested in 30 workplaces. Employees completed the 26-item OCP instrument. Psychological distress was measured with the General Health Questionnaire (12-item); depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (21-item); and emotional exhaustion with five items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory general survey. Exploratory factor analysis evaluated the dimensionality of the OCP scale. Multilevel regression models estimated workplace-level variations, and the contribution of organizational culture factors to mental health and well-being after controlling for gender, age, and living with a partner.
Exploratory factor analysis of OCP items revealed four factors explaining about 75% of the variance, and supported the structure of the Competing Values Framework. Factors were labeled Group, Hierarchical, Rational and Developmental. Cronbach's alphas were high (0.82-0.89). Multilevel regression analysis suggested that the four culture types varied significantly between workplaces, and correlated with mental health and well-being outcomes. The Group culture type best distinguished between workplaces and had the strongest associations with the outcomes.
This study provides strong support for the use of the OCP scale for measuring organizational culture in population-based occupational health research in a way that is consistent with the Competing Values Framework. The Group organizational culture needs to be considered as a relevant factor in occupational health studies.
Notes
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Cites: J Occup Health Psychol. 1996 Jan;1(1):27-419547031
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012 Oct;103(4):663-8822823292
PubMed ID
23642223 View in PubMed
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Reliability and Hierarchical Structure of DSM-5 Pathological Traits in a Danish Mixed Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276683
Source
J Pers Disord. 2016 Feb;30(1):112-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sune Bo
Bo Bach
Erik Lykke Mortensen
Erik Simonsen
Source
J Pers Disord. 2016 Feb;30(1):112-29
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Personality
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sampling Studies
Self Report
Translations
Abstract
In this study we assessed the DSM-5 trait model in a large Danish sample (n = 1,119) with respect to reliability of the applied Danish version of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) self-report form by means of internal consistency and item discrimination. In addition, we tested whether the five-factor structure of the DSM-5 trait model can be replicated in a Danish independent sample using the PID-5 self-report form. Finally, we examined the hierarchical structure of DSM-5 traits. In terms of internal consistency and item discrimination, the applied PID-5 scales were generally found reliable and functional; our data resembled the five-factor structure of previous findings, and we identified a hierarchical structure from one to five factors that was conceptually reasonable and corresponded with existing findings. These results support the new DSM-5 trait model and suggest that it can be generalized to other languages and cultures.
PubMed ID
25905735 View in PubMed
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Responses to the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire in different seasons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46139
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;158(2):316-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
E. Lund
V. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. eiliv.lund@ism.uit.no
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;158(2):316-8
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Photoperiod
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Seasons
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study investigated whether results on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire, which is used for diagnosis of seasonal affective disorder, differed by the season in which the questionnaire was completed. METHOD: Every third month from March 1997 to February 1998, a population-based panel of 200 men and women age 27-72 years in Gamvik, northern Norway, completed a standardized questionnaire that included all items from the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. RESULTS: The average score for seasonal affective disorder changed over the year. The difference between the highest score, in March, and the lowest, in September, was 8.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Results on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire varied by season, but did not vary by seasonal differences in the amount of daylight.
PubMed ID
11156820 View in PubMed
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Stability of personality traits over a five-year period in Swedish patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and non-psychotic individuals: a study using the Swedish universities scales of personality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293445
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 02 27; 18(1):54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-27-2018
Author
Tomas Fagerberg
Erik Söderman
J Petter Gustavsson
Ingrid Agartz
Erik G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Human Brain Informatics (HUBIN), Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Tomas.Fagerberg@ki.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 02 27; 18(1):54
Date
02-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Universities
Abstract
Personality is considered as an important aspect in persons with psychotic disorders. Several studies have investigated personality in schizophrenia. However, no study has investigated stability of personality traits exceeding three years in patients with schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the stability of personality traits over a five-year period among patients with schizophrenia and non-psychotic individuals and to evaluate case-control differences.
Patients with psychotic disorders (n?=?36) and non-psychotic individuals (n?=?76) completed Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) at two occasions five years apart. SSP scores were analysed for effect of time and case-control differences by multiple analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and within-subjects correlation.
MANCOVA within-subjects analysis did not show any effect of time. Thus, SSP mean scale scores did not significantly vary during the five-year interval. Within subject correlations (Spearman) ranged 0.30-0.68 and 0.54-0.75 for the different SSP scales in patients and controls, respectively. Patients scored higher than controls in SSP scales Somatic Trait Anxiety, Psychic Trait Anxiety, Stress Susceptibility, Lack of Assertiveness, Detachment, Embitterment, and Mistrust.
The stability of the SSP personality trait was reasonably high among patients with psychotic disorder, although lower than among non-psychotic individuals, which is in accordance with previous research.
PubMed ID
29486736 View in PubMed
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The Swedish Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory: psychometrics and clinical correlates from a DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131109
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Rachel E Maddux
Lars-Gunnar Lundh
Martin Bäckström
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Rachel.Maddux@psychology.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):167-77
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Dysthymic Disorder
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Disorders - diagnosis
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Depressive personality is commonly seen in clinical practice, and today only one exclusive self-report instrument-the Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI)-is available for its assessment based on the DSM-IV description of the construct.
The purpose of this research was to evaluate a Swedish version of this measure (DPDI-Swe) in terms of its reliability, internal structure, and convergent validity using related variables from the DSM-IV criteria for depressive personality disorder (DPD) and the proposed DPD trait set for DSM-5.
A non-clinical sample of 255 adults in southern Sweden completed a self-report package, which, in addition to DPD, included the assessment of self-esteem, optimism, hope, rumination, worry, depression, and anxiety. Quality of life was also measured.
Results indicated that the DPDI-Swe was internally consistent (a = 0.96). Exploratory factor analysis with oblique rotation yielded three components, together accounting for 48.21% of the variance in DPDI-Swe scores. There were strong positive associations between the DPDI-Swe and measures of depression, anxiety, rumination, and worry, and strong negative associations between the DPDI-Swe and measures of self-esteem, optimism, hope, and quality of life. These significant relationships remained, albeit slightly diminished, after statistically controlling for current depressed mood.
The DPDI-Swe appears to be a reliable and valid measure of DPD, and it is available for clinical and research use.
PubMed ID
21936730 View in PubMed
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Swedish normative data on personality using the Temperament and Character Inventory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205549
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1998 May-Jun;39(3):122-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Brändström
P. Schlette
T R Przybeck
M. Lundberg
T. Forsgren
S. Sigvardsson
P O Nylander
L G Nilsson
R C Cloninger
R. Adolfsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1998 May-Jun;39(3):122-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality - classification
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Temperament - classification
Translating
Abstract
The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) is a self-report personality questionnaire based on Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality, which accounts for both normal and abnormal variation in the two major components of personality, temperament and character. Normative data for the Swedish TCI based on a representative Swedish sample of 1,300 adults are presented, and the psychometric properties of the questionnaire are discussed. The structure of the Swedish version replicates the American version well for the means, distribution of scores, and relationships within the between scales and subscales. Further, the Swedish inventory had a reliable factor structure and test-retest performance. The results of this study confirm the theory of temperament and character as a seven-factor model of personality.
PubMed ID
9606577 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 2 of 3.