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The problem of structural indeterminacy in multidimensional symptom report instruments. The case of SCL-90-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52573
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Jul;37(7):685-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
O. Vassend
A. Skrondal
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, Oslo, Norway. ovassend@odont.uio.no
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Jul;37(7):685-701
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The factor structure of SCL-90-R items and scales was analyzed using both exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results of CFA studies at the item-level failed to support the original nine-factor model, as well as several alternative models and EFA suggested very different dimensionality, depending on which criteria were used. Analyses at the scale-level (i.e. the nine original symptom dimensions) suggested that a one- or two-factor model was satisfactory according to descriptive goodness of fit criteria. However, using the likelihood ratio test, specification of four factors was necessary to avoid rejection. According to the likelihood ratio test in a multi-group analysis, a lack of factorial invariance across gender was indicated. Moreover, the factorial structure of the instrument was clearly different across levels of negative affectivity (NA); the dimensionality was substantially higher in the low-NA group as compared to the high-NA group. It is concluded that we are confronted with a profound structural indeterminacy problem and that factor analytic methods and model acceptance criteria alone are insufficient to solve this problem. The indeterminacy problem can be accounted for, at least in part, by the complex logical-semantical structure of SCL-90-R items and scales and the role of the NA trait as a structure generating factor.
PubMed ID
10402693 View in PubMed
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Responses to the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire in different seasons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46139
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;158(2):316-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
E. Lund
V. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. eiliv.lund@ism.uit.no
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;158(2):316-8
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Photoperiod
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Seasons
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study investigated whether results on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire, which is used for diagnosis of seasonal affective disorder, differed by the season in which the questionnaire was completed. METHOD: Every third month from March 1997 to February 1998, a population-based panel of 200 men and women age 27-72 years in Gamvik, northern Norway, completed a standardized questionnaire that included all items from the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. RESULTS: The average score for seasonal affective disorder changed over the year. The difference between the highest score, in March, and the lowest, in September, was 8.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Results on the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire varied by season, but did not vary by seasonal differences in the amount of daylight.
PubMed ID
11156820 View in PubMed
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