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22 records – page 1 of 3.

Affect regulation and psychopathology in women with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118764
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rune Andersen
Nina Timmerby
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Forskningsenhed, Region Sjælland, Roskilde, Denmark. runan@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - etiology
Aggression - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - etiology
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychopathology
Self Report
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology
Translating
Abstract
Dysfunction in affect regulation is a prominent feature that grossly impairs behavioural and interpersonal domains of experience and underlies a great deal of the psychopathology in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, no study has yet been published that evaluates the psychometric properties of the translated Danish version of self-report measures sensitive to the different aspects and dimensions of dysfunction in affect regulation prevalent in BPD.
This study comprised a group of women diagnosed with BPD (n = 29) and a comparison group of healthy subjects (n = 29) who reported psychopathology and levels of affective instability, aggression, impulsivity and alexithymia by self-report measures.
Our results demonstrated that women with BPD have significant psychopathology and report significantly higher levels of dysfunction in separate components of affect regulation by self-report measures than the comparison group of healthy subjects. Our results also provided partial support for the psychometric appropriateness and clinical relevance of the translated Danish version of affect regulation measures.
The normative reference range indicated by our results makes the measures useful as a practical assessment tool.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
23171744 View in PubMed
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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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Assessment of affect integration: validation of the affect consciousness construct.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101734
Source
J Pers Assess. 2011 May;93(3):257-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Ole André Solbakken
Roger Sandvik Hansen
Odd E Havik
Jon T Monsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. o.a.solbakken@psykologi.uio.no
Source
J Pers Assess. 2011 May;93(3):257-65
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Aged
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Norway
Personality Assessment - standards
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychometrics
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Affect integration, or the capacity to utilize the motivational and signal properties of affect for personal adjustment, is assumed to be an important aspect of psychological health and functioning. Affect integration has been operationalized through the affect consciousness (AC) construct as degrees of awareness, tolerance, nonverbal expression, and conceptual expression of nine discrete affects. A semistructured Affect Consciousness Interview (ACI) and separate Affect Consciousness Scales (ACSs) have been developed to specifically assess these aspects of affect integration. This study explored the construct validity of AC in a Norwegian clinical sample including estimates of reliability and assessment of structure by factor analyses. External validity issues were addressed by examining the relationships between scores on the ACSs and self-rated symptom- and interpersonal problem measures as well as independent, observer-based ratings of personality disorder criteria and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994).
PubMed ID
21516584 View in PubMed
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Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in patients with breast disease and breast cancer: a prospective case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137438
Source
In Vivo. 2011 Jan-Feb;25(1):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Matti Eskelinen
Paula Ollonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Kuopio University Hospital, PL 1777, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. matti.eskelinen@kuh.fi
Source
In Vivo. 2011 Jan-Feb;25(1):111-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk
Abstract
In 1972, Beck introduced an inventory (BDI) for rapid screening of depression. The associations between the BDI and the risk of breast cancer (BC) are rarely considered together in prospective studies.
In an extension of the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study, 115 women with breast cancer symptoms were semi-structurally interviewed in-depth as well as asked to complete standardised questionnaires (Forsen, Spielberger, MADRS), and all study variables were obtained before any diagnostic procedures were carried out. BDI was used to evaluate the depression of the study participants.
The clinical examinations and biopsies showed BC in 34 patients, benign breast disease (BBD) in 53 patients, and 28 individuals were shown to be healthy (HSS). There was a trend for the women with HSS to have less sadness (BDI mean score, 0.27) than those of the BC (BDI mean score, 0.56) and BBD groups (BDI mean score, 0.49). The HSS group tended to be less pessimistic (BDI mean score, 0.15) than the patients in the BC group (BDI mean score, 0.44) and in the BBD group (BDI mean score, 0.42). The HSS group also had less self-accusation (BDI mean score, 0.19) than the patients in the BC group (BDI mean score, 0.50) and the patients in the BBD group (BDI mean score, 0.62). The HSS group also reported less work inhibition and weight loss than the patients in the BC group and in the BBD group. The mean sum of the scores of BDI variables was significantly lower in the HSS group (BDI mean score, 7.1) than in the BC (BDI mean score, 8.4) or BBD groups (BDI mean score, 8.8).
The results of this study do not support a specific link between BDI and breast cancer risk. However, the patients with BC and BBD tended to have an increased risk for depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
21282743 View in PubMed
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Continuity between interview-rated personality disorders and self-reported DSM-5 traits in a Danish psychiatric sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291088
Source
Personal Disord. 2017 Jul; 8(3):261-267
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Bo Bach
Jaime Anderson
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Region Zealand.
Source
Personal Disord. 2017 Jul; 8(3):261-267
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) Section III offers an alternative model for the diagnosis of personality disorders (PDs), including 25 pathological personality trait facets organized into 5 trait domains. To maintain continuity with the categorical PD diagnoses found in DSM-5 Section II, specified sets of facets are configured into familiar PD types. The current study aimed to evaluate the continuity across the Section II and III models of PDs. A sample of 142 psychiatric outpatients were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and rated with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II disorders. We investigated whether the DSM-5 Section III facet-profiles would be associated with their respective Section II counterparts, as well as determining whether additional facets could augment the prediction of the Section II disorders. Results showed that, overall, the interview-rated DSM-5 Section II disorders were most strongly associated with expected self-reported Section III traits. Results also supported the addition of facets not included in the proposed Section III PD criteria. These findings partly underscore the continuity between the Section II and III models of PDs and suggest how it may be enhanced; however, additional research is needed to further evaluate where continuity exists, where it does not exist, and how the traits system could be improved. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
26784892 View in PubMed
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French-language validation of the DACL and MAACL-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220413
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1993 Sep;49(5):685-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
A C Beckingham
G. Coutu-Wakulczyk
B. Lubin
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1993 Sep;49(5):685-95
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Translations
Abstract
The objective of this methodological pilot study was to make a contribution to the French-language validation of the Depressive Adjective Check List (DACL) Set 2 of Forms, E, F, G trait version (Lubin, 1981) and to that of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (MAACL-R; Zuckerman & Lubin, 1985). The importance of the study was to validate the French-language translation of these instruments to assess nonclinical depression or dysphoria and affect in two French- and English-speaking convenience sample groups. The Check Lists were administered to 183 Canadian subjects 60 years of age and over of both sexes from rural areas in the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Canada. In order to ensure that the words chosen carried the same connotation as in the English language, a translation-retranslation technique was used. The data collected from this study suggest that the DACL Form G would be most valid to use with either language and/or site in the protocol for future studies.
PubMed ID
8254076 View in PubMed
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Increased anxiety and depression in Danish cardiac patients with a type D personality: cross-validation of the Type D Scale (DS14).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95280
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2009;16(2):98-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Spindler Helle
Kruse Charlotte
Zwisler Ann-Dorthe
Pedersen Susanne S
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2009;16(2):98-107
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - psychology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - psychology
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in cardiovascular disease. We examined the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Type D Scale (DS14) and the impact of Type D on anxiety and depression in cardiac patients. METHOD: Cardiac patients (n = 707) completed the DS14, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. A subgroup (n = 318) also completed the DS14 at 3 or 12 weeks. RESULTS: The two-factor structure of the DS14 was confirmed; the subscales negative affectivity and social inhibition were shown to be valid, internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.87/0.91; mean inter-item correlations = 0.49/0.59), and stable over 3 and 12 weeks (r = 0.85/0.78; 0.83/0.79; ps
PubMed ID
19322662 View in PubMed
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Inventory of interpersonal problems: a three-dimensional balanced and scalable 48-item version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198014
Source
J Pers Assess. 2000 Apr;74(2):296-310
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
T. Gude
T. Moum
E. Kaldestad
S. Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Science in Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. tore.gude@basalmed.uio.no
Source
J Pers Assess. 2000 Apr;74(2):296-310
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Interpersonal relating has been a focus of attention in psychiatry for decades. To address this domain, a self-rating scale, the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP; Horowitz, Rosenberg, Baer, Ureño, & Villaseñor, 1988), was developed. Analysis of the psychometric properties of IIP presented in this article was performed by principal component analysis (PCA) for the purpose of obtaining subscales with a balanced, bipolar dimensionality. The model was validated by the resulting dimensions' ability to discriminate among different categories of personality disorders (PDs). The problem of a General Complaint factor affecting PCAs of questionnaires such as the IIP is discussed thoroughly, and ways of avoiding the problem are outlined. We present a three-dimensional structure of the IIP with both theoretically appealing and statistically robust dimensions of Assertiveness, Sociability, and Interpersonal Sensitivity based on 48 (out of 127) items. Balanced, additive indexes using the subset of 48 items appeared psychometrically sound by showing much lower correlations internally and less confounding from the General Complaint factor than extant indexes derived from the IIP. External validity seemed to be bolstered by all subscales' discriminating significantly between different PDs versus no PDs, on both cluster and single diagnosis levels. Our analysis seemed to substantiate the reliability (scalability) of three dimensions of the IIP tapping different areas of the interpersonal relational field.
PubMed ID
10879357 View in PubMed
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Los Cinco Grandes across cultures and ethnic groups: multitrait multimethod analyses of the Big Five in Spanish and English.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204210
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 1998 Sep;75(3):729-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
V. Benet-Martínez
O P John
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA. veronica@umich.edu
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 1998 Sep;75(3):729-50
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
California
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Discriminant Analysis
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Spain
Students - psychology
Translating
Abstract
Spanish-language measures of the Big Five personality dimensions are needed for research on Hispanic minority populations. Three studies were conducted to evaluate a Spanish version of the Big Five Inventory (BFI) (O. P. John et al., 1991) and explore the generalizability of the Big Five factor structure in Latin cultural groups. In Study 1, a cross-cultural design was used to compare the Spanish and English BFI in college students from Spain and the United States, to assess factor congruence across languages, and to test convergence with indigenous Spanish Big Five markers. In Study 2, a bilingual design was used to compare the Spanish and English BFI in a college-educated sample of bilingual Hispanics and to test convergent and discriminant validity across the two languages as well as with the NEO Five Factor Inventory in both English and Spanish. Study 3 replicated the BFI findings from Study 2 in a working-class Hispanic bilingual sample. Results show that (a) the Spanish BFI may serve as an efficient, reliable, and factorially valid measure of the Big Five for research on Spanish-speaking individuals and (b) there is little evidence for substantial cultural differences in personality structure at the broad level of abstraction represented by the Big Five dimensions.
PubMed ID
9781409 View in PubMed
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Personality traits in established schizophrenia: aspects of usability and differences between patients and controls using the Swedish universities Scales of Personality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278088
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;70(6):462-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Tomas Fagerberg
Erik Söderman
J Petter Gustavsson
Ingrid Agartz
Erik G Jönsson
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;70(6):462-9
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Assessment - standards
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Universities
Abstract
Personality is considered as an important aspect that can affect symptoms and social function in persons with schizophrenia. The personality questionnaire Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) has not previously been used in psychotic disorder.
To investigate if SSP has a similar internal consistency and factor structure in a psychosis population as among healthy controls and if patients with psychotic disorders differ from non-psychotic individuals in their responses to the SSP.
Patients with psychotic disorders (n?=?107) and healthy controls (n?=?119) completed SSP. SSP scores were analyzed for internal consistency and case-control differences by Cronbach's alfa and multiple analysis of covariance, respectively.
Internal consistencies among patients were overall similar to that of controls. The patients scored significantly higher in seven (Somatic trait anxiety, Psychic trait anxiety, Stress susceptibility, Lack of assertiveness, Detachment, Embitterment, Mistrust) and lower in three (Physical trait aggression, Verbal trait aggression, Adventure seeking) of the 13 scales of the inventory. In three scales (Impulsiveness, Social desirability and Trait irritability) there was no significant difference between the scoring of patients and healthy controls.
The reliability estimates suggest that SSP can be used by patients with psychotic disorders in stable remission. Patients score higher on neuroticism-related scales and lower on aggression-related scales than controls, which is in accordance with earlier studies where other personality inventories were used.
PubMed ID
27103375 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.