Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278086
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Nov;70(8):563-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Per Bech
Lars Vedel Kessing
Jens Drachmann Bukh
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Nov;70(8):563-6
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Dysthymic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Time Factors
Abstract
In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome.
The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up of patients initially diagnosed with first episode depression using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) to express depressive symptoms.
A total of 301 in- or outpatients aged 18-70 years with a recent single depressive episode were assessed by ENS, BDI, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS.
A total of 185 participants were available for the psychometric analysis of the ESN and BDI, and the scalability was found acceptable. In total, 99 patients were available for the predictive analysis. Both the ENS and the BDI were significantly associated with depressive symptoms (HAM-D17?=?8) at the 5-year follow-up (p?
PubMed ID
27181030 View in PubMed
Less detail