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Acupuncture treatment for women with concurrent substance use and anxiety/depression: an effective alternative therapy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164364
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christine M A Courbasson
Alicia Araujo de Sorkin
Berit Dullerud
Lucy Van Wyk
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Christine_Courbasson@camh.net
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture, Ear
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Anxiety Disorders - complications - prevention & control
Depressive Disorder - complications - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personality Inventory
Self Efficacy
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This exploratory study evaluated the benefits of adding auricular acupuncture to a 21-day outpatient structured psychoeducational treatment program for women with concurrent substance use problems, anxiety, and depression. Women receiving acupuncture (n = 185) reported having reduced physiological cravings for substances, felt significantly less depressed, less anxious, and were better able to reflect on and resolve difficulties than women in the control group (n = 101). It was found that auricular acupuncture, as an adjunct therapy to a comprehensive psychoeducational treatment program for women with addictions, shows promise in being an effective, more viable treatment alternative to anxiolytics.
PubMed ID
19241647 View in PubMed
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Acute intermittent porphyria: a psychometric study of twenty-five patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110199
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1969 Mar;13(1):91-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1969

The acute psychological impact on survivors following a train accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214853
Source
J Trauma Stress. 1995 Jul;8(3):391-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
R. Hagström
Source
J Trauma Stress. 1995 Jul;8(3):391-402
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Railroads
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology
Survival - psychology
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - psychology
Abstract
Sixty-six passengers surviving a collision of two trains were investigated concerning relevant background data, degree of personal injury, experience of a threat to life, symptoms and problems immediately after the accident, and thoughts about difficulty in coping. The most obvious impact on the survivors was the experience of being close to death. One result of this was that they developed a new coping strategy to minimize emotional pain. Some survivors also suffered problems of "re-living" the accident. This is important for the coping process. The process includes psychological integration of the accident as an important life event. The findings indicate that "re-living" of the accident through nightmares and intrusive thoughts is responsible for problems in carrying out ordinary tasks. The observations are in accordance with those made after other types of accidents and disasters.
PubMed ID
7582605 View in PubMed
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Acute stress disorder after myocardial infarction: prevalence and associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154428
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Nov;70(9):1028-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Marie-Anne Roberge
Gilles Dupuis
André Marchand
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Nov;70(9):1028-34
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Personality Inventory
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) after a myocardial infarction (MI) and the factors associated with its development.
Of 1344 MI patients admitted to three Canadian hospitals, 474 patients did not meet the inclusion criteria and 393 declined participation in the study; 477 patients consented to participate in the study. A structured interview and questionnaires were administered to patients 48 hours to 14 days post MI (mean +/- standard deviation = 4 +/- 2.73 days).
Four percent were classified as having ASD using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, ASD module. The presence of symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory; odds ratio (OR) = 29.92) and the presence of perceived distress during the MI (measured using the question "How difficult/upsetting was the experience of your MI?"; OR = 3.42, R(2) = .35) were associated with the presence of symptoms of ASD on the Modified PTSD Symptom Scale. The intensity of the symptoms of depression was associated with the intensity of ASD symptoms (R = .65). The models for the detection and estimation of ASD symptoms were validated by applying the regression equations to 72 participants not included in the initial regressions. The results obtained in the validation sample did not differ from those obtained in the initial sample.
The symptoms of depression and the subjective distress during the MI could be used to improve the detection of ASD.
PubMed ID
18981272 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and analysis of psychometric features of the Caregiver Risk Screen: a tool for detecting the risk of burden in family caregivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116528
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 May;25(5):755-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Silvia Martinez-Rodriguez
Nuria Ortiz-Marqués
Ioseba Iraurgi
María Carrasco
José J Miguel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain. silvia.martinez@deusto.es
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 May;25(5):755-64
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
There are a limited number of scales available in the Spanish language that can be used to detect burden among individuals who care for a dependent family member. The purpose of this work was to adapt and validate the Caregiver Risk Screen (CRS) scale developed by Guberman et al. (2001) (Guberman, N., Keefe, J., Fancey, P., Nahmiash, D. and Barylak, L. (2001). Development of Screening and Assessment Tools for Family Caregivers: Final Report. Montreal, Canada: Health Transition Fund).
The sample was made up of 302 informal caregivers of dependent family members (average age 57.3 years, and 78.9% were women). Scale structure was subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent and convergent validity were assessed by correlation with validated questionnaires for measuring burden (Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI)) and psychological health (SCL-90-R).
The results show a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86), suitable fit of the one-dimensional model tested via confirmatory factor analysis (GFI = 0.91; CFI = 0.91; RMSEA = 0.097), and appropriate convergent validity with similar constructs (r = 0.77 with ZBI; and r-values between 0.45 and 0.63 with SCL-90-R dimensions).
The findings are promising in terms of their adaptation of the CRS to Spanish, and the results enable us to draw the conclusion that the CRS is a suitable tool for assessing and detecting strain in family caregivers. Nevertheless, new research is required that explores all the psychometric features on the scale.
PubMed ID
23388522 View in PubMed
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Affective personality as cognitive-emotional presymptom profiles regulatory for self-reported health predispositions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92039
Source
Neurotox Res. 2008 Aug;14(1):21-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Archer T.
Adolfsson B.
Karlsson E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Göteborg, Box 500, SE-430 50 Göteborg, Sweden. trevor.archer@psy.gu.se
Source
Neurotox Res. 2008 Aug;14(1):21-44
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cognition - physiology
Disease Susceptibility - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Personality
Personality Inventory
Predictive value of tests
Self Concept
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Three studies that examined the links between affective personality, as constructed from responses to the Positive Affect (PA) and Negative Affect (NA) Scale (PANAS), and individuals' self-report of self-esteem, intrinsic motivation and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) depression in high school students and persons in working occupations are described. Self-report estimations of several other neuropsychiatric and psychosocial variables including, the Uppsala Sleep Inventory (USI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) test, Dispositional optimism, Locus of control, the Subjective Stress Experience test (SSE) and the Stress-Energy (SE) test, were also derived. Marked effects due to affective personality type upon somatic and psychological stress, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, internal and external locus of control, optimism, stress and energy, intrinsic motivation, external regulation, identified regulation, major sleep problems, problems falling asleep, and psychophysiological problems were observed; levels of self-esteem, self-motivation and BDI-depression all produced substantial effects on health and well-being. Regression analyses indicated PA was predicted by dispositional optimism (thrice), energy (thrice), and intrinsic motivation, and counter predicted by depression (twice) and stress (twice); and NA by anxiety (twice), stress (twice), psychological stress, identified regulation, BDI depression and psychophysiological problems, and counter predicted by internal locus of control and self-esteem. BDI-depression was predicted by negative affect, major sleep problems and psychophysiological problems (Study III), self-esteem by dispositional optimism and energy, and counter predicted by anxiety, depression and stress (Study I), and intrinsic motivation by dispositional optimism, energy, PA and self-esteem (Study II). These convergent findings are interpreted from a perspective of the cognitive-emotional expressions underlying behavioural or presymptomatic profiles presenting predispositions for health or ill health.
PubMed ID
18790723 View in PubMed
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Age, gender, and the underutilization of mental health services: the influence of help-seeking attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166978
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2006 Nov;10(6):574-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
C S Mackenzie
W L Gekoski
V J Knox
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2006 Nov;10(6):574-82
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Demography
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Marital status
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to explore age and gender differences in attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help, and to examine whether attitudes negatively influence intentions to seek help among older adults and men, whose mental health needs are underserved. To achieve these objectives 206 community-dwelling adults completed questionnaires measuring help-seeking attitudes, psychiatric symptomatology, prior help-seeking, and intentions to seek help. Older age and female gender were associated with more positive help-seeking attitudes in this sample, although age and gender interacted with marital status and education, and had varying influences on different attitude components. Age and gender also influenced intentions to seek professional psychological help. Women exhibited more favourable intentions to seek help from mental health professionals than men, likely due to their positive attitudes concerning psychological openness. Older adults exhibited more favourable intentions to seek help from primary care physicians than younger adults, a finding that was not explained by age differences in attitudes. Results from this study suggest that negative attitudes related to psychological openness might contribute to men's underutilization of mental health services. Help-seeking attitudes do not appear to be a barrier to seeking professional help among older adults, although their intentions to visit primary care physicians might be. These findings suggest the need for education to improve men's help-seeking attitudes and to enhance older adults' willingness to seek specialty mental health services.
PubMed ID
17050086 View in PubMed
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Age is strongly associated with alexithymia in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166745
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2006 Nov;61(5):629-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Aino K Mattila
Jouko K Salminen
Tapio Nummi
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2006 Nov;61(5):629-35
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We studied the prevalence of alexithymia, its distribution in different age groups in a wide age range, its association with sociodemographic and health-related variables, and its co-occurrence with depression.
The study forms part of the Health 2000 Study. The original sample comprised 8028 subjects representing the general adult population of Finland. Alexithymia was measured with the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and depression was measured with the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory. Altogether, 5454 participants filled in TAS-20 in their mother tongue.
The prevalence of alexithymia was 9.9%. Men (11.9%) were more commonly alexithymic than women (8.1%). Alexithymia was associated with male gender, increasing age, low educational level, poor perceived health, and depression.
The findings were in line with earlier population studies. For the first time, it was possible to analyze the prevalence of alexithymia in a wide age range (30-97 years). International comparative studies are needed.
PubMed ID
17084140 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia, human relationships, and mobile phone use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140272
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010 Oct;198(10):722-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Aino K Mattila
Sinikka Luutonen
Mikko Ylinen
Raimo K R Salokangas
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010 Oct;198(10):722-7
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Aged
Cellular Phone - utilization
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Emotions
Female
Finland
Friends - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Young Adult
Abstract
Alexithymia is a personality trait associated with difficulties in identifying feelings, difficulties in describing feelings to other people, constricted imaginal processes, and an externally oriented cognitive style. It has been found to be associated with personality features that may cause interpersonally avoidant behavior and other interpersonal problems. The present study explored, in a sample of primary care patients (N = 491), whether alexithymia is associated with mobile phone usage, and whether the perceived quality and quantity of human relationships mediate its effect. Even controlling for sociodemographic variables and symptoms of depression, mania and psychoses, alexithymia, measured by the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, was associated with less frequent mobile phone use. Not having enough relationships or a close friend, and relationships being less satisfactory mediated the effect of alexithymia on less frequent mobile phone use. The results support the findings of earlier studies that have linked interpersonal problems with alexithymia.
PubMed ID
20921862 View in PubMed
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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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198 records – page 1 of 20.