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Personality characteristics and perceived health problems after burn injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70954
Source
J Burn Care Rehabil. 2004 May-Jun;25(3):228-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Morten Kildal
Mimmie Willebrand
Gerhard Andersson
Bengt Gerdin
Lisa Ekselius
Author Affiliation
Burn Unit, the Department of Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Burn Care Rehabil. 2004 May-Jun;25(3):228-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Burn Units
Burns - complications - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Neurotic Disorders
Personality Inventory
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The relationship between personality traits and the perceived outcome of burn injury 1 to 18 years (mean, 9.2 years) after severe burn injury was evaluated in 166 individuals treated at the Uppsala Burn Unit. The perceived outcome was measured with the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B) and was related to personality traits evaluated by means of the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. After controlling for age at inquiry, time since injury, burn area, and sex, a stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed an association between the Swedish universities Scales of Personality domain Neuroticism and Bad outcome in all BSHS-B domains, both psychosocial and physical, and Insufficient outcome in the domains Work, Body image, Affect, and BSHS-B total score. The neurotic traits Somatic trait anxiety, Psychic trait anxiety, Stress susceptibility, Embitterment, and Mistrust each or in different combinations explained the observed relationships. The data suggest that personality is related to health status because it is perceived a long time after severe burn injury and that its effect is not confined only to psychological but also to physical aspects of life.
PubMed ID
15273462 View in PubMed
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Personality disorders in former child psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31163
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;11(6):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Mia Ramklint
Anne-Liis von Knorring
Lars von Knorring
Lisa Ekselius
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;11(6):289-95
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Personality Inventory
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The present case-control study was undertaken in order to investigate the long-term outcome with respect to personality disorder (PD) symptomatology in former child psychiatric in-patients as compared to matched controls from the general population. Altogether 359 former patients and 359 controls were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 164 (46 %) former patients and 193 (54 %) controls approved participation. From these, 137 age and sex-matched pairs with a mean age of 30.7 (SD = 6.8) years were constructed. Adult PD symptomatology was assessed by means of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q). There were 52 former patients (38 %) and 15 controls (10.9 %) who fulfilled criteria for at least one DSM-IV self-reported PD. There was a significantly higher prevalence for all specific self-reported PDs in former patients compared to controls. The mean number of disorders was 1.7 (SD = 2.6) in former patients and 0.3 (SD = 0.8) in controls. Moreover, former patients fulfilled more PD criteria than controls (23 vs. 11; median numbers). The former patients had significantly lower global functioning and more psychosocial problems than the controls. These problems were related to personality pathology. The results of this study indicate that child psychiatric morbidity seems to increase the risk for adult PD symptomatology. However, the results may be biased by the low participation rate.
PubMed ID
12541008 View in PubMed
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Psychiatric comorbidity and personality traits in patients with hyperacusis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118026
Source
Int J Audiol. 2013 Apr;52(4):230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Linda Jüris
Gerhard Andersson
Hans Christian Larsen
Lisa Ekselius
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Audiol. 2013 Apr;52(4):230-5
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Hyperacusis - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Personality
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sweden - epidemiology
Tinnitus - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Hyperacusis, defined as unusual intolerance of ordinary environmental sounds, is a common problem. In spite of this, there is limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that individuals with hyperacusis would be prone to suffer from psychiatric disorders, related in particular to anxiety. Therefore, psychiatric morbidity and personality traits were investigated, along with different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics.
Patients were assessed with a clinical interview related to symptoms of hyperacusis, the Mini-international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI), and the Swedish Universities scales of Personality (SSP) to study psychiatric disorders and personality traits.
A group of 62 Swedish patients with hyperacusis between 18 and 61 years (mean 40.2, SD 12.2) was included.
Altogether 56% of the patients had at least one psychiatric disorder, and 47% had an anxiety disorder. Also, personality traits related to neuroticism were over-represented. A majority, 79%, suffered from comorbid tinnitus, and a similar proportion used measures to avoid noisy environments.
The over-representation of anxiety disorders and anxiety-related personality traits in patients with hyperacusis suggests common or cooperating mechanisms. Cognitive behavioural treatment strategies, proven efficient in treating anxiety, may be indicated and are suggested for further studies.
PubMed ID
23244506 View in PubMed
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