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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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Assessing violence risk and psychopathy in juvenile and adult offenders: a survey of clinical practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145664
Source
Assessment. 2010 Sep;17(3):377-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jodi L Viljoen
Kaitlyn McLachlan
Gina M Vincent
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. jviljoen@sfu.ca
Source
Assessment. 2010 Sep;17(3):377-95
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antisocial Personality Disorder - classification - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Risk assessment
United States - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study surveyed 199 forensic clinicians about the practices that they use in assessing violence risk in juvenile and adult offenders. Results indicated that the use of risk assessment and psychopathy tools was common. Although clinicians reported more routine use of psychopathy measures in adult risk assessments compared with juvenile risks assessments, 79% of clinicians reported using psychopathy measures at least once in a while in juvenile risk assessments. Extremely few clinicians, however, believe that juveniles should be labeled or referred to as psychopaths. Juvenile risk reports were more likely than adult reports to routinely discuss treatment and protective factors, and provide recommendations to reevaluate risk. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
20124429 View in PubMed
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[Chronic schizophrenia-like psychoses in epilepsy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148655
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2009;109(8):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
M V Usiukina
S V Kornilova
A S Shamanaev
T A Shakhbazi
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2009;109(8):16-20
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chronic Disease
Disease Progression
Epilepsy - complications
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Clinical peculiarities of interictal chronic epileptic psychoses were studied in 58 patients. The authors suggested a systematic of schizophrenia-like psychoses in epilepsy. Hallucinoses, paranoid, depressive, manic and catatonic psychotic states were described. The relationship between schizophrenia and epilepsy was discussed. It has been concluded that the character of personality changes plays a central role in the diagnostic of epileptic psychosis.
PubMed ID
19738563 View in PubMed
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Comparison of hospital-treated personality disorders and personality disorders in a general population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177668
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2004;58(5):357-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Liisa Kantojärvi
Juha Veijola
Kristian Läksy
Jari Jokelainen
Anne Herva
Juha T Karvonen
Pirkko Kokkonen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Finland. liisa.kantojarvi@oulu.fi
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2004;58(5):357-62
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Population Surveillance
Registries
Abstract
The distribution of personality disorders (PDs) was explored in hospital-treated subjects and in a population subsample. This study forms a part of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study. Hospital case records of psychiatric treatment periods of all cohort members (n=11,017) were reviewed and re-checked against DSM-III-R criteria. A subsample of the cohort members living in Oulu (n=1609) were invited to a two-stage psychiatric field survey with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) as a diagnostic method. The most common PDs in hospital-treated sample were cluster B PDs (erratic). In the population subsample, cluster C PDs (anxious) formed the majority.
PubMed ID
15513612 View in PubMed
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Psychopathic Personality in the General Population: Differences and Similarities Across Gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283326
Source
J Pers Disord. 2017 Feb;31(1):49-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Olivier F Colins
Kostas A Fanti
Randall T Salekin
Henrik Andershed
Source
J Pers Disord. 2017 Feb;31(1):49-74
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - classification - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to identify distinct subgroups of adults in a general population sample (N = 2,500; 52.6% females) based on their scores on three psychopathy dimensions. Using latent profile analysis, five groups were identified among males and females separately, including a psychopathic personality group. Multivariate analyses of variance showed that this latter group had higher levels of aggression, offending, substance use, attention-deficit/hyperactivity symptoms, internalizing problems, and maltreatment than most of the other groups. Associated features of males and females with a psychopathic personality were very similar; however, salient gender differences did emerge. Specifically, females with a psychopathic personality were more frequently exposed to sexual abuse, expressed more emotional difficulties, and engaged in higher levels of relational aggression. In conclusion, person-oriented analyses identified adults with a personality that looks like psychopathy, and furthered our understanding of gender similarities and differences in these adults.
PubMed ID
26845529 View in PubMed
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