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[30 years later: children attending a counseling service up to 3 years of age]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33638
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 1998 Sep;47(7):477-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
P. de Château
Author Affiliation
Academisch Centrum Kinder- en Jeugd-psychiatrie Oost-Nederland, Nijmegen.
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 1998 Sep;47(7):477-85
Date
Sep-1998
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Child Guidance Clinics
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Personality Development
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
From 1953 through 1955 a total of 2364 individuals between o and 18 years were discharged from the Stockholm Child Guidance Clinics. Among these patients 125 (68 boys, 57 girls) were under the age of 3 years. A follow-up study was conducted 30 years later on this sample using records from psychiatric clinics and data from official registers of problematic behaviours. The majority of the infants when seen at the Child Guidance Clinics were judged to be mentally healthy or to have shown mild environmental reactions. However sixty per cent of these patients were identified in at least one of the registers during the follow-up period. Thus the initial evaluation was not prognostic of the future development. Boys developed mainly social maladjustment, whereas girls more often applied for psychiatric care during the follow-up. Significant prognostic factors in the 1950s were gender and parental psychiatric diagnosis.
PubMed ID
9796360 View in PubMed
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[Acclimatization of relocated children and adolescents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38186
Source
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr. 1989 Mar;17(1):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
I. Moilanen
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Kinderklinik, Universität Oulu, Finnland.
Source
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr. 1989 Mar;17(1):10-6
Date
Mar-1989
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Child
Child Reactive Disorders - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Finland
Humans
Learning Disorders - psychology
Male
Personality Development
Psychological Tests
Self Concept
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The effects of return migration on emotional well-being were studied in those school-aged children and adolescents who had returned to northern Finland from Sweden during 1984 and 1985. Each of the 320 returning children and adolescents was assigned a control from the same class at school, matched for age and sex, who had not emigrated. According to a parent questionnaire, the returning boys were irritable more often than the control boys, and they also scored higher on the self-report scale "Children's Depression Inventory." In the teachers' evaluations (Rutter B2 Scale), the returning boys had psychiatric disorders more often than their controls. For both returning boys and girls, overall scholastic achievement was poorer than in the controls, but performance in foreign languages (mainly English) was better. If the father was absent from the family, this was reflected in the scholastic achievement and emotional well-being of both the returnees and the control subjects. How well the children coped with their return to Finland was also affected by what the language of instruction had been in Sweden, whether there had been a language change upon returning to Finland and how much mental preparation there had been for moving.
PubMed ID
2728619 View in PubMed
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Active commuting to and from school among Swedish children--a national and regional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134964
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Apr;22(2):209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Klara Johansson
Lucie Laflamme
Marie Hasselberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Division of Global Health/IHCAR, Nobels väg 9, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. klara.johansson@ki.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Apr;22(2):209-14
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Growth
Health Surveys
Housing
Humans
Male
Motor Skills
Personality Development
Schools
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Students
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Active commuting to school by walking or cycling can have positive impact on children's health and development. The study investigates the prevalence of active commuting to school in Sweden, a setting where it is facilitated and promoted; and how active commuting varies according to socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics.
Self-reports from a national sample of Swedish children (11- to 15-year-olds, n = 4415) and a regional one from Stockholm County (13-year-olds, n = 1008) on transport to school were compared. The association that active commuting has with socio-demographic (gender, school grade, Swedish origin, type of housing, urbanicity in the local area), and socio-economic characteristics (household socio-economic status, family car ownership) was studied using logistic regression, controlling for car ownership and urbanicity, respectively.
Active commuting was high (62.9% in the national sample) but decreased with age-76% at the age of 11 years, 62% at the age of 13 years and 50% at the age of 15 years-whereas public transport increased (19-43%). Living in an apartment or row-house (compared with detached house) and living in a medium-sized city (compared with a metropolitan area) was associated with active commuting. In urban areas, active commuting was more common in worker households compared with intermediate- to high-level salaried employees.
Active commuting is common but decreases with age. Active commuting differed based on housing and urbanicity but not based on gender or Swedish origin, and impact of socio-economic factors differed depending on level of urbanicity.
PubMed ID
21521708 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (AEQ-A): a short version for use among 13-year-olds in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11720
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1993 Jun;34(2):107-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
H. Aas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1993 Jun;34(2):107-18
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Personality Development
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Set (Psychology)
Abstract
An adaptation of a Norwegian modified short version of Christiansen & Goldman's Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire for Adolescents (AEQ-A) was examined in this survey. Subjects were 924 Norwegian seventh graders, with an average age of 13.3 years. From the original 90 items, 27 items representing all seven original scales were used in this study. Factor analysis did not create any preferred new factor solution compared to Christiansen & Goldman's original factors. Internal consistency of the seven AEQ-A scales ranged from 0.37 to 0.72 on Cronbach's alpha. All seven AEQ-A scales correlated significantly with self-reported alcohol use as was expected, and this study also replicated the relative importance of the social enhancement scale. This was the first study using AEQ-A in a non-English-speaking culture. The generalizability of alcohol outcome expectancies was strongly supported. The present study indicates that the Norwegian version of AEQ-A possesses a level of concurrent validity and internal reliability that is acceptable compared to the original scales, and can serve as a useful instrument in behavioral research on alcohol use among Norwegian adolescents in the years to come.
PubMed ID
8322045 View in PubMed
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Adolescent development and youth suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222221
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1993;23(4):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H M Aro
M J Marttunen
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1993;23(4):359-65
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Development
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The adolescent years, being a period of unique developmental changes, are of great interest in understanding suicidal behavior. The occurrence of completed suicide by age in 1-year age groups in adolescence and young adulthood was studied via official Finnish mortality statistics and the population statistics. Suicide rates increased sharply by age during adolescence, starting somewhat earlier among boys than among girls. During the periods of rapidly rising and high suicide rates in the 1970s and 1980s among boys, the increase in suicide rates started at a younger age than during a spell of lower rates in the 1960s.
PubMed ID
8310469 View in PubMed
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Adolescent initiation into drug-taking behavior: comparisons over a 5-year interval.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6195
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Mar;26(3):267-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
B. Segal
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Mar;26(3):267-79
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Acquisition curves for six substances were compared for adolescents in two samples separated by a 5-year interval. Individual variations in initiation ages were found for different substances, but the general pattern of exposures to drugs was essentially stable over the time interval. The findings suggest that there appears to be a range of first experience with drugs that extends from 13 to 16 years. Special emphasis was given to the implications which the findings have for education and intervention programs, and for further research.
PubMed ID
1889925 View in PubMed
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Adolescent personality development: three phases, three courses and varying turmoil. Findings from the Toronto Adolescent Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230392
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):500-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
H. Golombek
P. Marton
B A Stein
M. Korenblum
Author Affiliation
Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):500-4
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Individuation
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Object Attachment
Ontario
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Personality Disorders - psychology
Psychosexual Development
Self Concept
Abstract
The Toronto Adolescent Longitudinal Study was launched in 1977 to examine personality development in a non-clinical sample of children from ages ten through 19 over an eight year period. Following a description of their conceptualized model of personality and of the nature of the study, the authors summarize their findings which suggest new perspectives in three areas of adolescent personality development: 1) the subphases of adolescence, 2) the routes of passage through which adolescents proceed, and 3) adolescent turmoil.
PubMed ID
2766202 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' alcohol use related to perceived norms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11807
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1992 Dec;33(4):315-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
H. Aas
K I Klepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Sciences, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1992 Dec;33(4):315-25
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Peer Group
Personality Development
Social Facilitation
Social Values
Abstract
A questionnaire survey was carried out among 898 Norwegian adolescents age twelve to twenty. The study focused on the relation between adolescents' alcohol use on one side and estimated drinking norms (peers' drinking) together with attributed opinion norms (parents' and friends' acceptance of adolescents' alcohol use) on the other. On average, 5% of students in 7th, 8th, and 9th grade reported weekly alcohol use. They overestimated the number of fellow students using alcohol every week seven-fold. Students' estimates were significantly related to self-reported alcohol use. Even in high-school (10th, 11th and 12th grade) where 29% reported weekly alcohol use, students overestimated number of weekly drinkers among friends and fellow students by two-fold. Contrary to the results from a previous study conducted in Norway, in this study opinions attributed to both friends and parents about adolescents' alcohol use were significantly related to the students' own alcohol use. Estimated behavior norms and attributed opinion norms explained 46% of the observed variance in students' self-reported frequency of drinking. In a health promotion context, these results point to the importance of correcting student misconceptions about how often friends and fellow students drink alcohol.
PubMed ID
1287824 View in PubMed
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Aetiological and precipiating factors in wife battering. A psychosocial study of battered wives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12480
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1988 Mar;77(3):338-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
B. Bergman
G. Larsson
B. Brismar
M. Klang
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1988 Mar;77(3):338-45
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Family
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Spouse Abuse
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Sweden
Violence
Abstract
Forty-nine women who attended a surgical emergency department after being battered are the subjects of this prospective study. The childhood and adolescence of the women had been marked by abuse and violence in the parental home. Most of the women had suffered prolonged, repeated battering. Fifty-one per cent of the women and 88% of their male assailants were considered to be heavy consumers of alcohol and in over half of the cases of battering both the man and the women had been drinking. In most cases the women's own children were present when the mother was beaten. One third of the women stated that they were highly dependent on the man in question emotionally. It is concluded that social heredity, heavy consumption of alcohol and emotional dependence on the male assailant are major reasons for the woman's inability to break away from a relationship characterized by repeated battering.
PubMed ID
3394536 View in PubMed
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An exploration of developmental factors related to deviant sexual preferences among adult rapists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179551
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):151-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Eric Beauregard
Patrick Lussier
Jean Proulx
Author Affiliation
School of Criminology, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7. eric.beauregard@sympatico.ca
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):151-61
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - psychology
Erotica
Fantasy
Female
Humans
Male
Penile Erection - psychology
Personality Development
Quebec - epidemiology
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate developmental factors related to deviant sexual preferences in a sample of 118 sexual aggressors against women. For each subject, developmental factors were collected through a semistructured interview, whereas sexual preferences were assessed phallometrically using French translations of audiotaped stimuli developed by G. G. Abel, E. B. Blanchard, J. V. Becker, and A. Djenderedjian (1978). Using multiple regression analyses, our results showed that a sexually inappropriate family environment, use of pornography during childhood and adolescence, and deviant sexual fantasies during childhood and adolescence are related to the development of deviant sexual preferences. These results are in agreement with Knight and Sims-Knight's model of sexual aggression (R. A. Knight & J. E. Sims-Knight, in press).
PubMed ID
15208899 View in PubMed
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240 records – page 1 of 24.