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Accuracy of reported weight and menstrual status in teenage girls with eating disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70529
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Dec;38(4):375-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Ingemar Swenne
Erik Belfrage
Barbro Thurfjell
Ingemar Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ingemar.swenne@akademiska.se
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Dec;38(4):375-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amenorrhea - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Body Weight
Bulimia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The current study investigated the accuracy of reported current and historical weights and of menstrual status in teenage girls with eating disorders. METHOD: Reported current weight in one interview was compared with measured weight at another occasion. Reported historical weights were compared with documented weights from growth charts of the school health services. Reports of menstrual status from two different interviews were compared. RESULTS: The overall correlation between reported and measured/documented weight was high. Current weight was reported with high accuracy in all diagnostic groups and without tendencies to underreport. Patients with bulimia nervosa, but not those with anorexia nervosa, underreported their historical top weight. The most common reason for large discrepancies between reported and documented historical weights was that the two weights compared referred to different time points. The reports on menstrual status were divergent for 13% of the patients, most notably 4 of 15 patients on oral contraceptives had been categorized as having menstruations in one of the interviews. CONCLUSION: Reported weight history and menstrual status are of high accuracy in teenage girls with eating disorders.
PubMed ID
16231335 View in PubMed
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Adaptive defense use and resting blood pressure in a population-based sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182601
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2003 Dec;55(6):531-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Michael Wm MacGregor
Karina W Davidson
Cheryl Barksdale
Sheila Black
David MacLean
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2003 Dec;55(6):531-41
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood pressure
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - psychology
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Q-Sort - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
There is an accumulating body of research related to the psychosomatic study of blood pressure. One variable that has received attention is defense use. We examined the relation between defense use and blood pressure in men and women of different ages.
A random sample of 667 participants was selected from a population-based study. Resting blood pressure was obtained, and each participant was rated for defense use by a trained observer using Defense-Q. An Adaptive Defense Profile (ADP) score was calculated for each participant, and this score was related to blood pressure.
Regression analyses revealed a significant main effect for the ADP score for both diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Those persons with higher ADP scores had lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure. As well, a significant Age x Sex x ADP score interaction was found for diastolic blood pressure. Older women with a less ADP score had higher diastolic blood pressure.
These findings suggest the continued investigation of defense use and blood pressure.
PubMed ID
14642984 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia in a normal elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212557
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1996 Mar-Apr;37(2):144-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Joukamaa
S. Saarijärvi
M L Muuriaisniemi
R K Salokangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1996 Mar-Apr;37(2):144-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Aged
Aging - psychology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Reference Values
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alexithymia in an elderly Finnish population sample. Associations between alexithymia and sociodemographic factors were investigated, together with the relationship between alexithymia and perceived somatic health and self-reported psychic health. The study forms a part of the Turun Vanhustutkimus (TUR-VA) project, which is a longitudinal, prospective follow-up study dealing with psychosocial adaptation to retirement and to old age. The study group consisted of a population sample of 72-year-old people (N = 190). Alexithymia was measured with the 26-item version of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26). The prevalence of alexithymia was 34%. Alexithymia was associated with poor perceived somatic health. Alexithymia was associated with having a psychiatric disturbance (measured by the 36-item General Health Questionnaire [GHQ-36]), but this relationship disappeared when the influence of perceived somatic health was controlled for. Alexithymia was not associated with gender, marital status, social status, or residential area.
PubMed ID
8654065 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the construct of competence: a comparison of the FIT, the MacCAT-CA, and the MacCAT-T.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174651
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2005 Apr;29(2):229-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Patricia A Zapf
Ronald Roesch
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York, New York 10019, USA. pzapf@jjay.cuny.edu
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2005 Apr;29(2):229-52
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Models, Statistical
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Reproducibility of Results
Treatment Refusal - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
The 1990s witnessed Supreme Court decisions in both Canada and the United States on issues of competence that went against longstanding case law, psychological research, and common sense. These decisions held that there is to be one standard for all types of criminal competencies. The present research attempts to investigate whether this is an appropriate assumption and thus tests whether there are one or more constructs that underlie different types of competence. Two divergent types of competence were examined, competence to stand trial (both Canadian and American conceptualizations) and competence to consent to treatment, to determine if these different types of competence share a common underlying construct. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test this question and results indicate that there is a common construct that underlies different types of competence.
PubMed ID
15912726 View in PubMed
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An item response theory evaluation of three depression assessment instruments in a clinical sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123205
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012;12:84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mats Adler
Jerker Hetta
Göran Isacsson
Ulf Brodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. adler.mats@gmail.com
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012;12:84
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigates whether an analysis, based on Item Response Theory (IRT), can be used for initial evaluations of depression assessment instruments in a limited patient sample from an affective disorder outpatient clinic, with the aim to finding major advantages and deficiencies of the instruments.
Three depression assessment instruments, the depression module from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), the depression subscale of Affective Self Rating Scale (AS-18-D) and the Montgomery-?sberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) were evaluated in a sample of 61 patients with affective disorder diagnoses, mainly bipolar disorder. A '3- step IRT strategy' was used.
In a first step, the Mokken non-parametric analysis showed that PHQ9 and AS-18-D had strong overall scalabilities of 0.510 [C.I. 0.42, 0.61] and 0,513 [C.I. 0.41, 0.63] respectively, while MADRS had a weak scalability of 0.339 [C.I. 0.25, 0.43]. In a second step, a Rasch model analysis indicated large differences concerning the item discriminating capacity and was therefore considered not suitable for the data. In third step, applying a more flexible two parameter model, all three instruments showed large differences in item information and items had a low capacity to reliably measure respondents at low levels of depression severity.
We conclude that a stepwise IRT-approach, as performed in this study, is a suitable tool for studying assessment instruments at early stages of development. Such an analysis can give useful information, even in small samples, in order to construct more precise measurements or to evaluate existing assessment instruments. The study suggests that the PHQ9 and AS-18-D can be useful for measurement of depression severity in an outpatient clinic for affective disorder, while the MADRS shows weak measurement properties for this type of patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22721257 View in PubMed
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An open study of the effectiveness of Internet treatment for panic disorder delivered in a psychiatric setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154399
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):44-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jan Bergström
Gerhard Andersson
Andreas Karlsson
Sergej Andréewitch
Christian Rück
Per Carlbring
Nils Lindefors
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Jan.O.Bergstrom@ki.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):44-50
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Self Care - psychology
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) is common and can be treated effectively with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication or cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). However, the lack of access to CBT services has motivated the development of self-help approaches requiring less therapist contact. A novel treatment modality in this field, showing efficacy in several randomized trials but until now not evaluated within the context of regular psychiatric care, is Internet-based treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Internet-based CBT for patients in a psychiatric setting. Twenty consecutively referred patients with PD were included in the study. A structured clinical interview with a psychiatrist was conducted for inclusion, as well as at post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. The treatment consisted of a 10-week CBT-based self-help programme, including minimal therapist support by e-mail. At post-treatment, 94% of patients no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PD (82% at 6-month follow-up). The within-group effect sizes (for the main outcome PDSS; Panic Disorder Severity Scale) were Cohen's d=2.5 (pre- to post-treatment) and 2.8 (pre-treatment to follow-up), respectively. The proportion of responders on the PDSS was 75% at post-treatment and 70% at 6-month follow-up. The results supports earlier efficacy data on Internet-based CBT for PD and indicates that it is effective also within a regular psychiatric setting. However, a larger randomized controlled trial should be conducted, directly comparing Internet-based CBT with traditionally administered CBT within such a setting.
PubMed ID
18985514 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression in cancer patients: relation between the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20160
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2000 Jul;49(1):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
J. Skarstein
N. Aass
S D Fosså
E. Skovlund
A A Dahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2000 Jul;49(1):27-34
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology
Comparative Study
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Norway
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Sick Role
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The emotional functioning (EF) dimension of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C33) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) evaluate anxiety and depression. We wanted to compare cancer patients' responses to EF with those to HADS, as well as the impact of anxiety and depression on the quality of life (QL) dimensions of the EORTC QLQ C33. METHOD: A total of 568 cancer patients completed both the EORTC QLQ C33 and HADS at the same occasion. The association between the patients' EF scorings and their HADS scores was analyzed by multiple linear regression. Gender and age were included as covariates. RESULTS: Statistically significant negative relations were found between EF and HADS-A (anxiety), HADS-D (depression) and HADS-T (total score), respectively, with the highest correlation coefficient for HADS-A. Older patients and males reported less emotional distress assessed by the EF scale than younger ones and females with comparable HADS-T or HADS-D scores. Both HADS-A and HADS-D were significantly related to other QL dimensions, and depression was a stronger predictor for reduced QL than anxiety. CONCLUSION: The EF dimension of EORTC QLQ C33 predominantly assesses anxiety, whereas depression is rated to a lesser degree. Combined with significant age and gender relations, this implies a risk of underdiagnosed depression, if the EORTC QLQ C33 is used as the only instrument to screen for psychological distress in cancer patients. As depression has a stronger impact on global QL of cancer patients than anxiety, the use of an additional instrument is recommended for assessment of depression.
PubMed ID
11053601 View in PubMed
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Are the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales a valid and practical instrument to measure outcomes in North America? A three-site evaluation across Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167176
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2007 Apr;43(2):91-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Stephen Kisely
Leslie Anne Campbell
Doug Crossman
Stephen Gleich
John Campbell
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. Stephen.Kisley@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2007 Apr;43(2):91-107
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Child
Community Mental Health Services
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Observer Variation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
We tested the usability, sensitivity and validity of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) in routine clinical practice in North America. Three pilot sites provided ratings on all inpatient and outpatient referrals over 4 months using versions covering children and adolescents (HoNOSCA), working-age adults and the over-65s. Data were entered using the routine administrative data system. Sixty-one percent of eligible patients had at least one HoNOS rating (n = 485). Following the initial rating, subsequent completion rates reached 80%. Ratings were sensitive to time and setting, with significantly higher scores in inpatients than outpatients. Individual diagnoses had different patterns of scores, further supporting validity.
PubMed ID
17021953 View in PubMed
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Assessing the needs for care of non-psychotic patients. A trial with a new standardized procedure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225306
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;26(6):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
A D Lesage
S J Cope
S. Pezeshgi
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Hôpital Louis-H. Lafontaine, Montréal, Canada.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;26(6):281-6
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Certificate of Need - standards
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quebec
Abstract
Recent psychiatric epidemiological studies using standardized interviews in the community have yielded high rates of non-psychotic disorders. The implications for service provision in terms of treatment and planning remain unclear. No methodology exists to link the individual needs for care and services to problems associated with disorders. The Needs for Care Assessment Schedule (NFCAS) is a relatively new procedure for assessing the needs of long-term mentally ill patients, mostly psychotic and attending psychiatric services. We report here a trial application of a modified version of the NFCAS on a sample of 39 non-psychotic patients, most of whom were attending psychiatric outpatient services. The results show that the modified procedure requires further refinement to achieve acceptability and reliability. Some improvements are suggested for refining items and for the collation of others. The difficulties encountered underline the key issues in developing such technology: specifying the threshold for recognizing the problems, detailing the interventions considered appropriate, defining the model of care and specifying the composition of the research team.
PubMed ID
1792559 View in PubMed
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The association between economic and social factors and mental health in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214517
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Sep;92(3):208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
H. Viinamäki
O. Kontula
L. Niskanen
K. Koskela
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Sep;92(3):208-13
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the social and economic variables associated with mental health by means of telephone interviews of a randomly chosen population sample (n = 1557) in Finland in 1993. Mental health was evaluated by means of a 12-item General Health Questionnaire. A mental disorder, indicated by the GHQ score, was detected in 18.3% of the interviewees. Mental disorders were more common in women than in men. Other factors associated with a mental disorder were unemployment, financial difficulties and insufficient social support from other people. Mental disorders, indicated by the GHQ score, were common in the long-term unemployed, users of hypnotics and sedatives, and in those who were uncertain about their future. In stepwise logistic regression analyses the statistically independent associates with impaired mental health were suicidal thoughts, receiving of housing allowance and female sex. On the other hand, being on salary was a protective factor.
PubMed ID
7484200 View in PubMed
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142 records – page 1 of 15.