Skip header and navigation

Refine By

40 records – page 1 of 4.

Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Sep;24(3):218-248878376
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-923117467
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 Nov;15(4):316-339838975
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Apr;12(2):102-1415785295
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S512-2216294114
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S531-4316294116
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2006 Mar;15(2):191-20116468076
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jun;30(6):1384-917473059
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Sep;39(9):1502-817805081
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):181-818091006
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):59-6418091020
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 1;167(7):875-8118303006
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2008 Jun;18(3):309-1717645730
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2009 Jun;43(6):442-5018487253
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 May;41(5):998-100519346988
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 2009 Nov;25(4):661-75, viii19944266
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1055-6420406758
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1065-820406761
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Feb;20(1):e41-719422647
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Apr;43(4):647-5420689449
Cites: Health Rep. 2011 Mar;22(1):7-1421510585
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2012;9:E2622172193
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-7221796052
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2000 Jun;71(2 Suppl):S1-1410925819
Cites: WHO Reg Publ Eur Ser. 1996;58:i-xiii, 1-1618857196
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Jul;32(7):1327-3810912901
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Feb;32(2):500-522075247
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jun;33(6 Suppl):S598-608; discussion S609-1011427784
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jul;33(7):1233-4011445774
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Oct;56 Spec No 2:36-4611730236
Cites: Physiol Meas. 2004 Apr;25(2):R1-2015132305
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2004 Aug;22(8):703-2515370483
Cites: J Gerontol. 1993 Jan;48(1):M10-48418139
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2012;5. doi: 10.3402/gha.v5i0.848822833712
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 1997 Mar-Apr;18(2):165-749119792
PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adding a baby to the equation. married and cohabiting women's relationship satisfaction in the transition to parenthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126051
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Øystein Mortensen
Torbjørn Torsheim
Ole Melkevik
Frode Thuen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. oystein.mortensen@uib.no
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Models, Psychological
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
The trajectory of relationship satisfaction among married and cohabiting women in their transition to parenthood was compared in a potential sample of 71,504 women taking part in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Prospective longitudinal data were collected in 4 waves over a 2-year period starting 6 months prebirth. Results from latent curve models suggested that married and cohabiting women experience similar negative change in relationship satisfaction during the transition to parenthood. However, cohabiting women start off and stay less satisfied throughout the transition period, suggesting the presence of a negative cohabitation effect that prevailed after controlling for various covariates. Extending investigation on the cohabitation effect to the transition to parenthood, and replicating it in a Scandinavian context, is discussed in relation to the understanding of what causes the cohabitation effect, and its clinical implications.
PubMed ID
22428715 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents' school-related self-concept mediates motor skills and psychosocial well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104309
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2014 Jun;84(Pt 2):268-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helena Viholainen
Tuija Aro
Jarno Purtsi
Asko Tolvanen
Marja Cantell
Author Affiliation
Special Education Unit, Department of Education, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2014 Jun;84(Pt 2):268-80
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Mathematics
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills - physiology
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Reading
Self Concept
Self Report
Social Behavior
Abstract
The health benefits of exercise participation and physical activity for mental health and psychosocial well-being (PSWB) have been shown in several studies. However, one important background factor, that is, motor skills (MSs), has largely been ignored. In addition, most of the existing research focuses on poor MSs, that is, poor MSs are often connected to poorer PSWB. The mechanism linking MSs and PSWB is unclear. However, a preliminary suggestion has been made that self-worth or self-perceptions might mediate the association between MSs and PSWB.
We investigated whether the self-concepts (SCs) of school-related physical education (SCPE), reading (SCR), and mathematics (SCM) mediate the relationship between MSs and PSWB in adolescence.
The study sample consisted of a second-grade female cohort (N = 327), ranging in age between 12 and 16 (years) in a municipality in Central Finland. PSWB was measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the school-related SCs by the SC of ability scale adapted for use in Finland. MSs was assessed by a self-reported adolescent version of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire. Structural mediator modelling was used to test the associations between MSs and PSWB with SC as a mediator.
First, MSs was strongly associated with school-related SCPE and SCM. However, a mediator role was observed only for SCPE, which weakly mediated peer problems. Second, MSs and PSWB, especially conduct problems, showed a very strong direct association.
The study suggests that MSs is connected to PSWB in adolescent girls. Enhancement of MSs could be a preventive strategy for supporting PSWB in adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
24829120 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between deprived life circumstances, wellbeing and self-rated health in a socially marginalized population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131249
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Oct;22(5):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Pia V Pedersen
Morten Grønbæk
Tine Curtis
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Oct;22(5):647-52
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self Report
Social Marginalization
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies of self-rated health among socially marginalized people provide insufficient understandings of what influences their self-rated health. This study aimed to examine how disadvantaged life circumstances (homelessness, substance abuse, poverty) and general well-being were associated with poor self-rated health among the socially marginalized.
In a nationwide survey in Denmark, 1348 users of shelters, drop-in centres, treatment centres and social psychiatric centres answered a self-administered questionnaire. We analysed data using logistic regression.
Disadvantaged life circumstances and well-being were associated with self-rated health, also when controlling for illness, mental disorder and age. Male respondents exposed to two or more disadvantaged life circumstances had higher odds of poor self-rated health [odds ratio (OR): 2.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80-4.87] than males exposed to fewer disadvantages. A low sense of personal well-being implied higher odds of poor self-rated health among both men and women. Among men, not showering regularly (OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.17-2.79), and among women, not eating varied food (OR: 2.24; 95% CI: 1.20-4.20) and exposure to physical violence (borderline significant) implied higher odds of poor self-rated health. Male and female respondents reporting lack of sleep and loneliness (borderline significant among women) had higher odds of poor self-rated health.
The poor self-rated health among socially marginalized is strongly associated with massive social problems, poor living conditions and poor well-being. This study elucidates the need for more broadly based and holistic initiatives by both the health sector and the social services, incorporating health promotion initiatives into social work.
PubMed ID
21920848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can a prenatal dental public health program make a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135131
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Diana Louise Lin
Rosamund Harrison
Jolanta Aleksejuniene
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. dianallin@aol.com
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Birth weight
British Columbia
Dental Care
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Oral Hygiene Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Personal Satisfaction
Poverty
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Public Health Dentistry
Self Report
Abstract
Some pregnant women may be at increased risk of poor oral health. A publicly funded prenatal dental program in Vancouver, British Columbia, called Healthiest Babies Possible (HBP), has been providing oral health education and limited clinical services for over 20 years to low-income women assessed to be at high risk of preterm or low-weight births. This report is an assessment of the initial outcomes.
A prospective before-after evaluation of a non-probability convenience sample of women was undertaken over 1 year (2005-2006). Participants were seen at the customary 2 clinic visits, and were asked to return for a postnatal visit. Data collected by an inside evaluator, the program's dental hygienist, included questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, observations, clinical indices, appointment statistics and self-reports. Univariate and bivariate analyses (Student's t test and ANOVA) were performed.
Of the 67 women in the sample, 61 agreed to participate; 36 (59%) attended all 3 appointments at the clinic, and 40 (66%) completed all 3 interviews and questionnaires either at the clinic or by telephone. Clinical indices of gingival health improved significantly over the time of the evaluation. Improvements in tooth cleaning were demonstrated by a significant decrease in plaque (p
PubMed ID
21507285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006;4:5616934161
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2006 Apr;114(2):115-2116630302
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:4018518948
Cites: Swed Dent J. 2008;32(4):187-9519172920
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2009 Apr;37(2):97-10318782331
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2009 Jun;117(3):286-9219583757
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):65-819261341
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;38(4):340-720353449
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2010 Oct;37(10):903-920528964
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:12621050499
Cites: Gerodontology. 2012 Mar;29(1):54-6320609006
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(6):370-619626467
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 May;143(5):488-9522547720
Cites: Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e902-822103883
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:5022587387
Cites: J Oral Rehabil. 2013 Apr;40(4):252-723356574
Cites: Gerodontology. 2001 Dec;18(2):121-3011794738
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Feb;32(1):10-814961835
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Apr;32(2):107-1415061859
Cites: J Dent Res. 1997 Jun;76(6):1292-79168863
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):41-79511841
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):52-619511843
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):62-99511844
Cites: J Oral Pathol Med. 2005 Apr;34(4):193-715752252
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2005 Aug;113(4):289-9616048520
Cites: Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(4):225-3516475451
Cites: Br Dent J. 2007 Jul 28;203(2):E3; discussion 100-117571092
PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change of lifestyle habits - Motivation and ability reported by pregnant women in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291858
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Oct; 13:83-90
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Maria Lindqvist
Marie Lindkvist
Eva Eurenius
Margareta Persson
Ingrid Mogren
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.lindqvist@umu.se.
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Oct; 13:83-90
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Habits
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Motivation
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnant Women
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnant women are generally more motivated to change their lifestyle habits compared with non-pregnant women. However, the ability to change these habits depends on the motivation to change. This study describes pregnant women's self-reported motivation and ability to change lifestyle habits and their relation to body mass index (BMI), self-rated health, educational level and country of origin.
This cross-sectional study combined data from the Maternal Health Care Register in Västerbotten (MHCR-VB) and the Salut Programme Register (Salut-R). Data were collected from 3,868 pregnant residents in Västerbotten County (northern Sweden) between 2011 and 2012. Chi-square test, two independent samples t-test and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed.
Most of the pregnant women (61.3%) were satisfied with their self-reported lifestyle habits irrespective of BMI, self-rated health, educational level, and country of origin. Many reported that they wanted to increase their physical activity, improve their dietary habits, and reduce their weight. In general, they estimated their ability to change their lifestyle habits as equal to their motivation of change. Women who reported a large or very large motivation to change their lifestyle habits were characterized by higher BMI and higher educational level.
Most of the participating pregnant women were satisfied with their lifestyle habits, although they reported being further motivated to change some of them. Health care professionals encountering fertile and pregnant women may have a unique opportunity to support and promote lifestyle changes, taking into account women's motivation for change. Future research should focus on factors that motivate pregnant women to change their lifestyle, explore barriers for change of lifestyle and how support best may be provided to pregnant women. In addition, studies on lifestyle and motivation for lifestyle change from non-Nordic countries are called for.
PubMed ID
28844363 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in food group consumption and associations with self-rated diet, health, life satisfaction, and mental and physical functioning over 5 years in very old Canadian men: the Manitoba Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119755
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Aug;16(8):707-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
S. Caligiuri
C. Lengyel
R. Tate
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, 405 Human Ecology Building, 35 Chancellors Circle, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 Canada. umcaligs@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Aug;16(8):707-12
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Mental health
Patient compliance
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Veterans Health
Abstract
To identify longitudinal food group consumption trends and the relationship to perceived changes in diet, health, and functioning.
A prospective longitudinal study.
Canada.
Seven hundred and thirty-six community-dwelling Canadian men (mean age: 2000=79.4 yrs; 2005=84.5 yrs) participating in the Manitoba Follow-up Study.
Self-reported food consumption, self-rated diet and health, life satisfaction, physical and mental functioning from questionnaires completed in 2000 and 2005.
The majority of participants did not consume from all four food groups daily, based on Canada's Food Guide recommendations, with only 8% in 2000 and up to 15% in 2005. However, over a five year period, more men improved their consumption in each food group than declined. An association was found between change in the self-rating of the healthiness of their diet and change in consumption of vegetables and fruit, or grain products. Men whose self-rating of the healthiness of their diet remained high or improved between 2000 and 2005, were 2.15 times more likely (95% CI=1.45, 3.17) to also have increased consumption of vegetables and fruit, and 1.71 times more likely (95% CI=1.51, 2.54) to have increased consumption of grain products, relative to men whose self-rating of the healthiness of their diet declined between 2000 and 2005. Men who consumed more food groups daily had better mental and physical component scores.
Dietary improvements are possible in very old men. Greater daily food group consumption is associated with better mental and physical functioning. Given these positive findings, there is still a need to identify older men who require support to improve their dietary habits as nearly half of the participants consumed two or fewer groups daily.
PubMed ID
23076513 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood chronic physical condition, self-reported health, and life satisfaction in adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114072
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 2013 Sep;172(9):1197-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Heidi Määttä
Tuula Hurtig
Anja Taanila
Meri Honkanen
Hanna Ebeling
Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, Oulu 90014, Finland. heidmaat@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 2013 Sep;172(9):1197-206
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - psychology
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self Report
Abstract
The present study investigates the prevalence and type of chronic conditions at 7 years of age-with special reference to atopic conditions-and their longitudinal associations with self-reported health and life satisfaction in adolescence. The data were obtained from Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (NFBC 1986), which is a longitudinal 1-year birth cohort from an unselected, regionally defined population (n?=?9,432). The present study investigated a sample of 8,036 children with data of chronic conditions at 7 years of age and a sample of 6,680 children with data of chronic conditions at 16 years of age. According to parents' report the prevalence of CC at 7 years of age was 14.8 % among boys and 13.2 % among girls, these figures being at 16 years of age 20.7 and 19.4 %, respectively. Atopic conditions were the most common chronic conditions at 7 years of age (12.7 % vs. other chronic conditions 4.7 %). Childhood chronic condition was associated with subsequent self-reported health in adolescence, but not with subsequent self-reported life satisfaction. Chronic condition at 7 years of age increased the risk of reporting health as "poor" even if the chronic condition was no longer prevalent at 16 years of age. Atopic conditions seemed to be linked with self-reported poor/moderate health more often than other chronic conditions among girls. Conclusion Childhood chronic conditions seem to affect adolescent's subjective health, but fortunately, they do not affect adolescents' subjective well-being to such an extent that it could lower their life satisfaction.
PubMed ID
23652935 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-cultural validity of the thyroid-specific quality-of-life patient-reported outcome measure, ThyPRO.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265802
Source
Qual Life Res. 2015 Mar;24(3):769-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Torquil Watt
Giuseppe Barbesino
Jakob Bue Bjorner
Steen Joop Bonnema
Branka Bukvic
Russell Drummond
Mogens Groenvold
Laszlo Hegedüs
Valeska Kantzer
Kathryn E Lasch
Claudio Marcocci
Anjali Mishra
Romana Netea-Maier
Merel Ekker
Ivan Paunovic
Terence J Quinn
Åse Krogh Rasmussen
Audrey Russell
Mayilvaganan Sabaretnam
Johannes Smit
Ove Törring
Vladan Zivaljevic
Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen
Source
Qual Life Res. 2015 Mar;24(3):769-80
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Denmark
Female
Humans
India
Italy
Language
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Patient Outcome Assessment
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Report
Serbia
Sweden
Thyroid Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Translations
Abstract
Thyroid diseases are common and often affect quality of life (QoL). No cross-culturally validated patient-reported outcome measuring thyroid-related QoL is available. The purpose of the present study was to test the cross-cultural validity of the newly developed thyroid-related patient-reported outcome ThyPRO, using tests for differential item functioning (DIF) according to language version.
The ThyPRO consists of 85 items summarized in 13 multi-item scales and one single item. Scales cover physical and mental symptoms, well-being and function as well as social and daily function and cosmetic concerns. Translation applied standard forward-backward methodology with subsequent cognitive interviews and reviews. Responses (N = 1,810) to the ThyPRO were collected in seven countries: UK (n = 166), The Netherlands (n = 147), Serbia (n = 150), Italy (n = 110), India (n = 148), Denmark (n = 902) and Sweden (n = 187). Translated versions were compared pairwise to the English version by examining uniform and nonuniform DIF, i.e., whether patients from different countries respond differently to a particular item, although they have identical level of the concept measured by the item. Analyses were controlled for thyroid diagnosis. DIF was investigated by ordinal logistic regression, testing for both statistical significance and magnitude (?R (2) > 0.02). Scale level was estimated by the sum score, after purification.
For twelve of the 84 tested items, DIF was identified in more than one language. Eight of these were small, but four were indicative of possible low translatability. Twenty-one instances of DIF in single languages were identified, indicating potential problems with the particular translation. However, only seven were of a magnitude which could affect scale scores, most of which could be explained by sample differences not controlled for.
The ThyPRO has good cross-cultural validity with only minor cross-cultural invariance and is recommended for use in international multicenter studies.
PubMed ID
25194574 View in PubMed
Less detail

40 records – page 1 of 4.