Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Life satisfaction in older women in Latvia and Sweden-relations to standard of living, aspects of health and coping behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121006
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2012 Dec;27(4):391-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Vibeke Horstmann
Maria Haak
Signe Tomsone
Susanne Iwarsson
Anne Gräsbeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences (Institutionen för hälsa, vård och samhälle), Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00, Lund, Sweden. vibeke.horstmann@med.lu.se
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2012 Dec;27(4):391-407
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Latvia
Logistic Models
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Single Parent
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To study and compare associations between life satisfaction and standard of living, health, and coping behaviour in older single-living women in two countries with different political, economical and cultural situations: Latvia and Sweden. Cross sectional data included 260 Latvian and 288 Swedish women, aged 75-84 and 80-89, from the ENABLE-AGE Survey Study. Life satisfaction was assessed by the question: All in all, how satisfied are you with your life? Standard of living was assessed by economic and housing conditions, and health by perceived and objective health and activities in daily living. Three factors, Fight, Helplessness, and Distraction, were obtained from the Coping Patterns Schedule. Correlations between Life satisfaction and standard of living, health, and coping were calculated. The variance in Life satisfaction explained by these variables was obtained in each sample by ordinal regression models. Life satisfaction was significantly lower in the Latvian sample than in the Swedish. Standard of living was lower and health poorer in the younger Latvian sample than in the Swedish, but more of the variance in Life satisfaction was explained in the Latvian sample by standard of living (18% vs 2%) and less by health (6% vs 15%). Coping factors explained 29% of the variation in Life satisfaction in the Latvian sample as opposed to 15% in the Swedish. For single-living older women low standard of living seems to be a more serious obstacle than poor health, making it difficult to obtain a reasonable life satisfaction.
PubMed ID
22948614 View in PubMed
Less detail