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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health learning in the forest and cultivated gardens: building a nutritious and sustainable food system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151012
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):263-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mirella L Stroink
Connie H Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. mstroink@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):263-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Food Supply
Forestry
Gardening - education - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Personal Satisfaction
Seafood
Abstract
Sustainable food systems are those in which diverse foods are produced in close proximity to a market. A dynamic, adaptive knowledge base that is grounded in local culture and geography and connected to outside knowledge resources is essential for such food systems to thrive. Sustainable food systems are particularly important to remote and Aboriginal communities, where extensive transportation makes food expensive and of poorer nutritional value. The Learning Garden program was developed and run with two First Nation communities in northwestern Ontario. With this program, the team adopted a holistic and experiential model of learning to begin rebuilding a knowledge base that would support a sustainable local food system. The program involved a series of workshops held in each community and facilitated by a community-based coordinator. Topics included cultivated gardening and forest foods. Results of survey data collected from 20 Aboriginal workshop participants are presented, revealing a moderate to low level of baseline knowledge of the traditional food system, and a reliance on the mainstream food system that is supported by food values that place convenience, ease, and price above the localness or cultural connectedness of the food. Preliminary findings from qualitative data are also presented on the process of learning that occurred in the program and some of the insights we have gained that are relevant to future adaptations of this program.
PubMed ID
19437287 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of dental appearance in a group of Finnish 16- to 25-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151199
Source
Angle Orthod. 2009 May;79(3):479-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Anna-Liisa Svedström-Oristo
Terttu Pietilä
Ilpo Pietilä
Tero Vahlberg
Pentti Alanen
Juha Varrela
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 2, 20520 Turku, Finland. anlisve@utu.fi
Source
Angle Orthod. 2009 May;79(3):479-83
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Area Under Curve
Diastema - pathology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Finland
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Malocclusion - classification - psychology
Needs Assessment
Orthodontics, Corrective - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
ROC Curve
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To define a grade in the Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) that would differentiate between esthetically acceptable and unacceptable occlusions and that would also be both subjectively and objectively meaningful.
Dental appearance and self-perceived orthodontic treatment need were analyzed in a group of Finnish young adults (171 males, 263 females, age range 16-25 years). Subjective data were gathered using a questionnaire, and the respondents were requested to score their dental appearance on a visual analog type 10-grade scale. Professional assessment of dental appearance was performed by two orthodontists using the AC of the IOTN. The cutoff value between esthetically acceptable and unacceptable occlusions was defined using receiver operating characteristic curves.
Sixty-six percent of orthodontically treated and 74% of the untreated respondents were satisfied with their own dental appearance. Every third respondent reported one or more disturbing traits in their dentition. The most frequently expressed reason for dissatisfaction was crowding; girls expressed dissatisfaction more often than boys did (P = .005). A self-perceived treatment need was reported infrequently by 8% of orthodontically treated and 6% of untreated respondents. In the logistic regression analysis, self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment was the only significant factor explaining dissatisfaction with own dental esthetics. On the applied scales, grades 1 and 2 fulfilled the criteria for satisfactory dental esthetics.
The results suggest that the AC grade 3 could serve as a cutoff value between esthetically acceptable and unacceptable occlusions.
PubMed ID
19413382 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of cosmetic surgery, body appreciation, body ideal internalization, and fashion blog reading among late adolescents in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108577
Source
Body Image. 2013 Sep;10(4):632-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Carolina Lunde
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: carolina.lunde@psy.gu.se.
Source
Body Image. 2013 Sep;10(4):632-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Blogging
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mass Media
Motivation - physiology
Personal Satisfaction
Sex Distribution
Social Values
Surgery, Plastic - psychology
Sweden
Thinness - psychology
Abstract
This study examined adolescents' attitudes of cosmetic surgery, as well as the relationships between these attitudes, body appreciation, body ideal internalization, and fashion blog reading. The sample comprised 110 (60 boys, 50 girls) late adolescents (mean age 16.9 years) from a Swedish high school. The results indicated that younger adolescents seem somewhat more accepting of cosmetic surgery. This was especially the case for boys' acceptance of social motives for obtaining cosmetic surgery (boys' M=2.3±1.55 vs. girls' M=1.7±0.89). Girls', and to a limited extent boys', internalization of the thin ideal was related to more favorable cosmetic surgery attitudes. Athletic ideal internalization and body appreciation were unrelated to these attitudes. Finally, girls who frequently read fashion blogs reported higher thin ideal internalization, and also demonstrated a slight tendency of more cosmetic surgery consideration.
PubMed ID
23871282 View in PubMed
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Accidental falls, health-related quality of life and life satisfaction: a prospective study of the general elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107598
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Jan-Feb;58(1):95-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magnus Stenhagen
Henrik Ekström
Eva Nordell
Sölve Elmståhl
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: magnus.stenhagen@med.lu.se.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Jan-Feb;58(1):95-100
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
As the physical consequences of accidental falls in the elderly are well-researched, the long-term associations between falls and quality of life and related concepts are less known. The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the long-term relations between falls and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and life satisfaction (LS) over six years in the general elderly population. One thousand three hundred and twenty-one subjects (aged 60-93 years), from the general population in the south of Sweden, were included in a baseline assessment and a follow-up after six years. HRQoL was measured with the SF-12 and LS with the life satisfaction index A (LSI-A). The differences in mean scores between fallers at baseline (n=113) and non-fallers were statistical analyzed. Furthermore, the prediction of falls on the outcomes was analyzed using a multivariate linear regression model adjusted for multiple confounding factors. Fallers scored significant lower in HRQoL and LS at baseline and after six years, compared to non-fallers, especially in the SF-12 physical component (p=
PubMed ID
23993268 View in PubMed
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Achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders/orofacial pain: a comparison between two dental schools in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279263
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Aug;19(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Z. Alsafi
A. Michelotti
R. Ohrbach
M. Nilner
T. List
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Aug;19(3):161-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Dental
Facial pain
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Schools, Dental
Students, Dental
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Abstract
The aim was to study achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders (TMD)/orofacial pain (OP) at two universities by comparing student's knowledge and understanding, satisfaction with their education and confidence in their clinical competences of TMD/OP.
The study was conducted in collaboration between Malmö University, Sweden—which uses problem-based learning—and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy—which uses traditional educational methods. Final-semester dental students responded to a self-report questionnaire regarding their knowledge and understanding, interpretation of cases histories, clinical experience, satisfaction and confidence in clinical examination, management and treatment evaluation.
No significant difference was found between the students regarding knowledge and understanding. Eighty-seven per cent of the Malmö students and 96% of the Naples students met the criterion on achieved competence. Malmö students had a higher per cent of correct diagnoses than Naples students in the interpretation of case histories. Overall, Malmö students reported most clinical experience and higher confidence than Naple students.
The main findings were that students from Malmö and Naples were, similar in knowledge and understanding of TMD/OP and in satisfaction with their clinical competences. However, Malmö students perceived more confidence in clinical management of patients with TMD/OP. This may reflect that, besides the theoretical part of the programme, a sufficient level of clinical exposure to patients with TMD/OP is essential to gain competences in TMD/OP.
PubMed ID
25168490 View in PubMed
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Adaptability and sustainability of an Indigenous Australian family wellbeing initiative in the context of Papua New Guinea: a follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131544
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;19 Suppl 1:S80-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Russel Kitau
Komla Tsey
Janya McCalman
Mary Whiteside
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea, Port Moresby, PNG. rkitau@hotmail.com
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;19 Suppl 1:S80-3
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Education - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Papua New Guinea
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
This paper describes the follow-up phase of a pilot collaborative initiative between the University of Papua New Guinea and James Cook University aimed at determining the relevance of an Indigenous Australian Family Wellbeing (FWB) empowerment program in the context of Papua New Guinea (PNG). It describes opportunities and challenges involved in adapting and sustaining the FWB approach to the PNG context. Two evaluation questionnaires were administered to 60 course participants.
Findings revealed that the course was relevant, adaptable and could readily be integrated with other health programs. In the context of PNG's target to meet its United Nations Millennium Development Goals by 2015, the Family Wellbeing approach offers an innovative approach to enhance existing health and community development initiatives.
PubMed ID
21878028 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and resiliency in Swedish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84584
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Sep;21(3):329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Kiehl Ermalynn M
Carson David K
Dykes Anna-Karin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. e.kiehl@louisville.edu
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Sep;21(3):329-37
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Nuclear Family - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
A longitudinal research project began in 1993 of Norwegian, Swedish and American mothers' perception of her family's dynamics and adaptation during childbearing and childrearing. Results indicated that Swedish mothers adapted better than other mothers. In 2003, a mixed design study was conducted with original Swedish mothers that aimed to describe the experience of motherhood, the meaning mothers attached to events in their lives that made adaptation necessary, and ways in which they achieved adaptation. Fourteen mothers completed quantitative instruments and 13 of those mothers were interviewed. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analysed for themes using a protocol based on a model of family resiliency. Quantitative findings revealed statistically significant findings in areas of children, mother's work outside the home and families in which a major illness had occurred. Qualitative findings revealed that protective factors far outweighed vulnerability and risk factors. Mothers' satisfaction with life manifested itself in love of home, contentment with employment, fulfillment from an active and healthy life and support from a society that provides a wide range of social benefits for the family. Vulnerability occurred primarily when mothers were tired, lacked personal time or someone in the family was experiencing a serious illness. Results of this study enhance the scholarly scientific knowledge about the uniqueness of Swedish mothers, and increased understanding of family dynamics and adaptation. Many of the findings relate in some way to overall social benefits and supports available for families.
PubMed ID
17727545 View in PubMed
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Adaptation to the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly: a prospective longitudinal study of maternal well-being and psychological distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259696
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ragnhild B Nes
Espen Røysamb
Lars J Hauge
Tom Kornstad
Markus A Landolt
Lorentz M Irgens
Leif Eskedal
Petter Kristensen
Margarete E Vollrath
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Checklist
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - psychology
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Models, Statistical
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Abstract
This study explores the stability and change in maternal life satisfaction and psychological distress following the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly using 5 assessments from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study collected from Pregnancy Week 17 to 36 months postpartum. Participating mothers were divided into those having infants with (a) Down syndrome (DS; n = 114), (b) cleft lip/palate (CLP; n = 179), and (c) no disability (ND; n = 99,122). Responses on the Satisfaction With Life Scale and a short version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist were analyzed using structural equation modeling, including latent growth curves. Satisfaction and distress levels were highly diverse in the sample, but fairly stable over time (retest correlations: .47-.68). However, the birth of a child with DS was associated with a rapid decrease in maternal life satisfaction and a corresponding increase in psychological distress observed between pregnancy and 6 months postpartum. The unique effects from DS on changes in satisfaction (Cohen's d = -.66) and distress (Cohen's d = .60) remained stable. Higher distress and lower life satisfaction at later assessments appeared to reflect a persistent burden that was already experienced 6 months after birth. CLP had a temporary impact (Cohen's d = .29) on maternal distress at 6 months. However, the overall trajectories did not differ between CLP and ND mothers. In sum, the birth of a child with DS influences maternal psychological distress and life satisfaction throughout the toddler period, whereas a curable condition like CLP has only a minor temporary effect on maternal psychological distress.
PubMed ID
24588521 View in PubMed
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812 records – page 1 of 82.