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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Date
2009
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Keywords
Arctic environment
Brominated flame retardants
Climate patterns
Contaminants
Diet
Effects in Arctic wildlife
Endosulfan
Fluorinated compounds
Food
Human exposure
Legacy POPs
Levels and trends
Metabolism
Nutrition
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs)
Public Health
Risk communication
Abstract
The current assessment report updates the information presented in the AMAP 1997 and 2002 assessment reports with respect to three subject areas: persistent organic pollutants, contaminants and human health, and radioactivity. The POPs update has a particular emphasis on 'emerging' and current-use POPs. The human health update addresses health effects of POPs, mercury, and lead exposure.
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Arctic pollution issues: A state of the Arctic environment report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99515
Date
1997
  1 document     1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Date
1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acidification
Arctic haze
Arctic residents
Climate change
Contaminant pathways
Contamination levels, trends, and effects
Geographical areas of concern
Heavy metals
Human exposure
Human health
Indigenous peoples
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Petroleum hydrocarbons
Polar ecology
Pollution
Potential threats
Radioactivity
Abstract
The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), established in 1991 under the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (AEPS), was given the responsibility to monitor the levels and assess the effects of selected anthropogenic pollutants in all compartments of the Arctic. This is the first AMAP assessment report, and it represents a collaborative effort involving over 400scientists and administrators. It is based on AMAP-coordinatednational and international monitoring programs within the eight Arctic countries, in combination with data and information from several research programs, including contributions from non-Arctic countries and international organizations.
Notes
Print copy available in UAA/APU Alaskana collection: QH545.A1 A72 1997. Print copy also available in ARLIS general collection: QH84.1.A73 1997
Also available to download from AMAP
Online Resources
Documents

ArcticPollutionIssues.pdf

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Biomonitoring in Greenland: Human biomarkers of exposure and effects - A short review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96585
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Bonefeld-Jorgensen, EC
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Denmark. ebj@mil.au.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Arctic ecosystem
Arctic populations
Bioaccumulation
Biomarkers
Biomonitoring
Exposure
Generation studies
Genetic polymorphisms
Greenland
Immune system
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Receptor effect studies
Traditional diet
Abstract
CONTEXT: Since 1997 the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) has produced integrated assessment reports on the status of and trends in environmental persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic ecosystem. Three reports on biomonitoring POPs and their health risks for Arctic populations were published in 1998, 2002, and 2009. ISSUE: The present review summarizes data from Greenland on human monitoring of biomarkers of POP exposure and bioaccumulation and the determination of biomarkers for POP effects. The review focuses on hormone disruptive potentials and some genetic sensitivity biomarkers. The overview covers Greenlandic studies from 2000 to 2006. LESSONS LEARNED: The Greenland biomonitoring studies showed general geographical and gender differences of bioaccumulated serum POP levels, which were primarily related to diet and lifestyle. A high intake of traditional Greenlandic diet (eg seal, whale, polar bear, and seabirds) together with smoking caused higher blood concentrations of POPs. The highest POP values were found on the east coast of Greenland. The receptor effect studies showed a general inverse relationship between high serum POP concentration and estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah-receptor (AhR) transactivity; in addition for men in the two West Greenlandic districts, Nuuk and Sisimiut, a trend towards increased induced AR activity was found. An observed trend to an opposite direction between the dioxin-like AhR and ER activity supports the perception of that dioxins exert an antiestrogen effect. In conclusion, the actual mixtures of serum POPs in Greenlandic Inuit have an endocrine disrupting potential. Comparisons between European and Greenlandic male serum POP levels showed significantly higher levels in Inuit; however, in the same study Inuit had significantly lower sperm DNA damage. Further studies are required to elucidate whether the serum POP related effects on hormone receptors and/or AhR are explanatory factors. 'The Arctic dilemma' is that along with the intake of the Greenlandic traditional diet that contains POPs, there are also a number of important nutrients, such as trace elements/antioxidants and marine unsaturated fatty acids which have favorable effects on health. However, a number of studies suggest that an increase in Western food items in the diet can lead to other health risks, such as the metabolic syndrome and its sequels increase in weight, hypertension, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, including breast cancer. To elucidate these aspects further studies are required, including those into biomarkers for exposure and effects, epigenetic contexts and the determination of relevant genetic polymorphisms, case-control as well as generation studies. Finally, there is a need for the development of new biomarkers to study the potential POP effects that inhibit the immune system and affect the development of the central nervous system.
PubMed ID
20572746 View in PubMed
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Source
Chapter 6 (pp. 183-335) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 6 (pp. 183-335) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Abiotic media
Arctic ecosystems
Bioaccumulation
Biological effects
Biomagnification
Biotic media
Chemical characteristics
Freshwater environments
Marine environments
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Physical characteristics
POP accumulation
Sources
Temporal variation
Terrestrial environments
Toxicology
Abstract
Interest in the presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Arctic aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems arises mainly from concerns that northern and indigenous peoples depending upon traditional food for most of their diet may be adversely affected by chronic exposure to these pollutants. This chapter deals mainly with persistent organochlorine (OC) pollutants as well as organotins.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
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Source
Chapter 12 (pp. 775-837) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 12 (pp. 775-837) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Contaminants
Essential elements
Health effects
Heavy metals
International data comparison
Nutrients
PAHs
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Radionuclides
Risk assessment, management, and communication
Toxicology
UV radiation
Abstract
This chapter on human health describes the levels of contaminants in humans and their effects on human health. It has not been written as an overview of the general health of the peoples of the Arctic. Rather, this chapter is an evaluation of the current knowledge of the consequences to Arctic peoples of environmental exposure to priority contaminants as defined in the AMAP mandate. Indirect health implications of climate change, oil pollution, and waste sites are treated in other chapters of this report.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
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Temporal trends of POPs in arctic foxes from Svalbard in light of a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297159
Source
Arctic University of Norway. Department of Arctic and Marine Biology. v, 31 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2013
glad og trist den er over. Martin Andersen IV Abstract The present study investigates concentrations and temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Svalbard, Norway, adjusted for sex, age, body condition
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, Martin Solhøi
Source
Arctic University of Norway. Department of Arctic and Marine Biology. v, 31 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
7288057
Keywords
Svalbard
Arctic fox
Climate change
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Liver
Reindeer
Abstract
The present study investigates concentrations and temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Svalbard, Norway, adjusted for sex, age, body condition, diet, reindeer mortality and sea ice coverage. Number of reindeer carcasses in Adventdalen and sea ice coverage of Isfjorden in the spring preceding the trapping season were used as indexes for climate influenced food availability between years. We analysed liver of 100 foxes from Svalbard, collected in 1997/98, 1998/99, 1999/00, 2001/02, 2002/03, 2003/04 and 2010/11 for concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; PCB -28, -52, -101, -118, -138, -153 and -180), chlordanes (cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane), p-p’-DDT, p-p’-DDE, HCB, mirex and ß-HCH. The POPs found in highest concentrations were oxychlordane, PCB-180 and PCB-153. We found evidence for a temporal decrease in SPCBs (PCB -118, -138, -153, -180), and Schlordanes (trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane) when controlling for possible confounding variables. We also found evidence for an effect of body condition and d13C on the POP concentrations, as thinner foxes and foxes feeding from the marine food web had significantly higher levels of POPs. There was no evidence for effects of sex, age, reindeer mortality and sea ice coverage on the concentrations of POPs, although increased reindeer mortality had a non-significant negative effect on all the POPs analysed. This study shows that correcting for body condition and diet is vital when investigating temporal trends of POPs in biota. It also illustrates some of the difficulties of investigating POP concentrations in an arctic predator living in an environment influenced by climatic variations.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.