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Risperidone versus perphenazine in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients with acute exacerbations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219811
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Dec;88(6):395-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
O J Høyberg
C. Fensbo
J. Remvig
O. Lingjaerde
M. Sloth-Nielsen
I. Salvesen
Author Affiliation
Central Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Aalesund, Norway.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Dec;88(6):395-402
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Isoxazoles - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease, Secondary - chemically induced - epidemiology
Perphenazine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Piperidines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risperidone
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Risperidone (RIS), a new neuroleptic with 5-HT2- and dopamine D2 receptor-blocking properties, was compared with perphenazine (PER) in a double-blind, multicentre, parallel-group study in 107 chronic schizophrenics with acute exacerbation. RIS 5-15 mg or PER 16-48 mg daily was given for 8 weeks. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Clinical Global Impression. Seventy-eight patients completed the trial; there was an equal number of dropouts on both drugs. The mean daily dose at endpoint was 8.5 mg RIS and 28 mg PER. The reduction in total PANSS score to endpoint did not differ significantly, although there was a tendency in favour of RIS. The number of patients with predominantly negative symptoms who showed at least 20% reduction in total PANSS score was significantly larger in the RIS group. Furthermore, the number of patients showing at least 20% reduction in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) score (BPRS being a subscale of PANSS) was significantly larger in the RIS group. The hostility cluster of BPRS improved more on RIS than on PER in the endpoint analysis. The overall prevalence of side effects was fairly similar in the two groups.
PubMed ID
7508675 View in PubMed
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11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
Less detail