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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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Accelerated Arctic land warming and permafrost degradation during rapid sea ice loss

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275999
Source
Geophysical Research Letters. 2008 Jun;35(11):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Lawrence, DM
Slater, AG
Tomas, RA
Holland, MM
Deser, C
Source
Geophysical Research Letters. 2008 Jun;35(11):1-6
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albedo
Arctic sea ice
Arctic warming
Land temperature
Permafrost
Abstract
Coupled climate models and recent observational evidence suggest that Arctic sea ice may undergo abrupt periods of loss during the next fifty years. Here, we evaluate how rapid sea ice loss affects terrestrial Arctic climate and ground thermal state in the Community Climate System Model. We find that simulated western Arctic land warming trends during rapid sea ice loss are 3.5 times greater than secular 21st century climate-change trends. The accelerated warming signal penetrates up to 1500 km inland and is apparent throughout most of the year, peaking in autumn. Idealized experiments using the Community Land Model, with improved permafrost dynamics, indicate that an accelerated warming period substantially increases ground heat accumulation. Enhanced heat accumulation leads to rapid degradation of warm permafrost and may increase the vulnerability of colder permafrost to degradation under continued warming. Taken together, these results imply a link between rapid sea ice loss and permafrost health.
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Achieving the NOAA Arctic Action Plan: The Missing Permafrost Element.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297129
Source
Science and Technology Infusion Climate Bulletin, NOAA’s National Weather Service. 39th NOAA Annual Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop, St. Louis, MO, 20-23 October 2014. p.70-73.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2014
, George Washington University, Washington, DC; Email: rachaelj@gwu.edu Achieving the NOAA Arctic Action Plan: The Missing Permafrost Element Rachael Jonassen1, Elchin Jafarov2, Kevin Schaefer2, Fiona Horsfall3, and Marina Timofeyeva3 1Department of Engineering Management and Systems
  1 document  
Author
Jonassen, Rachael
Jafarov, Elchin
Schaefer, Kevin
Horsfall, Fiona
Timofeyeva, Marina
Source
Science and Technology Infusion Climate Bulletin, NOAA’s National Weather Service. 39th NOAA Annual Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop, St. Louis, MO, 20-23 October 2014. p.70-73.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
177255
Keywords
Alaska
Permafrost
Forecasts
Documents
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Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Sea Grant
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Animals
Climate change
Permafrost
Introduced species
Ice
Ecosystem
Floods
Freezing
Abstract
Seventeen-minute video produced by Alaska Sea Grant and NOAA Alaska Region.
Online Resources
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Alpine soil microbial ecology in a changing world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301151
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 09 01; 94(9):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Johanna Donhauser
Beat Frey
Author Affiliation
Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 09 01; 94(9):
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Climate change
Ice Cover
Permafrost - chemistry - microbiology
Soil Microbiology
Tundra
Abstract
Climate change has a disproportionally large impact on alpine soil ecosystems, leading to pronounced changes in soil microbial diversity and function associated with effects on biogeochemical processes at the local and supraregional scales. However, due to restricted accessibility, high-altitude soils remain largely understudied and a considerable heterogeneity hampers the comparability of different alpine studies. Here, we highlight differences and similarities between alpine and arctic ecosystems, and we discuss the impact of climatic variables and associated vegetation and soil properties on microbial ecology. We consider how microbial alpha-diversity, community structures and function change along altitudinal gradients and with other topographic features such as slope aspect. In addition, we focus on alpine permafrost soils, harboring a surprisingly large unknown microbial diversity and on microbial succession along glacier forefield chronosequences constituting the most thoroughly studied alpine habitat. Finally, highlighting experimental approaches, we present climate change studies showing shifts in microbial community structures and function in response to warming and altered moisture, interestingly with some contradiction. Collectively, despite harsh environmental conditions, many specially adapted microorganisms are able to thrive in alpine environments. Their community structures strongly correlate with climatic, vegetation and soil properties and thus closely mirror the complexity and small-scale heterogeneity of alpine soils.
PubMed ID
30032189 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic methanotrophic communities thrive in deep submarine permafrost.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296101
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 22; 8(1):1291
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-22-2018
Author
Matthias Winkel
Julia Mitzscherling
Pier P Overduin
Fabian Horn
Maria Winterfeld
Ruud Rijkers
Mikhail N Grigoriev
Christian Knoblauch
Kai Mangelsdorf
Dirk Wagner
Susanne Liebner
Author Affiliation
GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Section 5.3 Geomicrobiology, 14473, Potsdam, Germany. mwinkel@gfz-potsdam.de.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 22; 8(1):1291
Date
01-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anaerobiosis - physiology
Archaea - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Carbon - metabolism
DNA, Archaeal - genetics
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Methane - metabolism
Nitrogen - metabolism
Oceans and Seas
Oxidation-Reduction
Permafrost - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia
Abstract
Thawing submarine permafrost is a source of methane to the subsurface biosphere. Methane oxidation in submarine permafrost sediments has been proposed, but the responsible microorganisms remain uncharacterized. We analyzed archaeal communities and identified distinct anaerobic methanotrophic assemblages of marine and terrestrial origin (ANME-2a/b, ANME-2d) both in frozen and completely thawed submarine permafrost sediments. Besides archaea potentially involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) we found a large diversity of archaea mainly belonging to Bathyarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Methane concentrations and d13C-methane signatures distinguish horizons of potential AOM coupled either to sulfate reduction in a sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) or to the reduction of other electron acceptors, such as iron, manganese or nitrate. Analysis of functional marker genes (mcrA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) corroborate potential activity of AOM communities in submarine permafrost sediments at low temperatures. Modeled potential AOM consumes 72-100% of submarine permafrost methane and up to 1.2?Tg of carbon per year for the total expected area of submarine permafrost. This is comparable with AOM habitats such as cold seeps. We thus propose that AOM is active where submarine permafrost thaws, which should be included in global methane budgets.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29358665 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Seasonal Active Layer Dynamics & Fate, Transport & Transformation of Three Chemical Clusters in Permafrost-Affected Soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297121
Source
RPIC, Regional Workshop on Federal Contaminated Sites, Edmonton, Alberta. 37 slides.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
June 3, 2015
Esquimalt Harbour Public Meeting October 29, 2009 Contaminated Sites Division “Analysis of Seasonal Active Layer Dynamics & Fate, Transport & Transformation of Three Chemical Clusters in Permafrost-Affected Soils” RPIC, Regional Workshop on Federal Contaminated Sites Edmonton
  1 document  
Author
Mohapatra, Asish
Author Affiliation
Contaminated Sites, Health Canada, Prairie Region - Alberta
Source
RPIC, Regional Workshop on Federal Contaminated Sites, Edmonton, Alberta. 37 slides.
Date
June 3, 2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
1359038
Keywords
Permafrost
Soils
Hydrologic dynamics
Thermal dynamics
Freezing
Groundwater
Chemical transport
Climate change
Documents
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Arctic Climate Feedbacks: Global Implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300995
Source
World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), International Arctic Programme, Oslo. 97 pages..
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
CLIMATE FEEDBACKS: GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS 7 ARCTIC CLIMATE CHANGE The Arctic climate feedbacks that are the focus of this report are taking place in the context of rapid and dramatic climate change in the Arctic. Rising temperatures, rapidly melting ice on land and sea, and thawing permafrost are
  1 document  
Author
Sommerkorn, Martin
Hassol, Susan Joy
Source
World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), International Arctic Programme, Oslo. 97 pages..
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
11404730
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Air temperature
Sea ice
Greenland Ice Sheet
Glacier retreat
Oceans
Permafrost warming and thawing
Notes
ISBN: 9782940443000
Documents
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Arctic Ocean synthesis: analysis of climate change impacts in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas with strategies for future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297070
Source
184 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
December 2008
the total ice volume, and the extent of the sea ice (Fig. 1; Walsh 2008). Other changes in the physical environment in the Arctic shelf regions include increased river discharge, rising sea-level, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Changes in albedo (light reflectance) associated with
  1 document  
Author
Hopcroft, Russ
Bluhm, Bodil
Gradinger, Rolf
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Source
184 p.
Date
December 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3882185
Keywords
Chukchi Sea
Beaufort Sea
Sea ice
Coastal erosion
Permafrost
Sea level
Marine wildlife
Documents
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Assessment of the potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287905
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
...................................................................................................................7 2.3.6 Permafrost ..............................................................................................................8 2.3.7 Sea Levels ..............................................................................................................8 2.4 Climate Change Predictions for
  1 document  
Author
Yoder, Sarah
Author Affiliation
Alaska Section of Epidemiology
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Sea levels
Permafrost
Glaciers
Weather patterns
Sea ice
Temperature
Subsistence
Infectious disease
Sanitation
Health services
Abstract
Background: Over the past century, the air and water temperatures in Alaska have warmed considerably faster than in the rest of the United States. Because Alaska is the only Arctic state in the Nation, Alaskans are likely to face some climate change challenges that will be different than those encountered in other states. For example, permafrost currently underlies 80% of Alaska and provides a stable foundation for the physical infrastructure of many Alaska communities. As has already been seen in numerous villages, the groundcover that overlies permafrost is vulnerable to sinking or caving if the permafrost thaws, resulting in costly damage to physical infrastructure. The reliance on subsistence resources is another contrast to many other states. Many Alaskans depend upon subsistence harvests of fish and wildlife resources for food and to support their way of life. Some Alaskans report that the changing environment has already impacted their traditional practices. Many past efforts to characterize the potential impacts of climate change in Alaska have focused primarily on describing expected changes to the physical environment and the ecosystem, and less on describing how these changes, in addition to changes in animal and environmental health, could affect human health. Thus, a careful analysis of how climate change could affect the health of people living in Alaska is warranted. The Alaska Division of Public Health has conducted such an assessment using the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework; the assessment is based on the current National Climate Assessment (NCA) predictions for Alaska. The document is intended to provide a broad overview of the potential adverse human health impacts of climate change in Alaska and to present examples of adaptation strategies for communities to consider when planning their own response efforts. This document does not present a new model for climate change in Alaska, and it does not offer a critique of the NCA predictions for Alaska.
Documents

AssessmentofthePotentialHealthImpactsof.pdf

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100 records – page 1 of 10.