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A 25-year perspective of peripheral nerve surgery: evolving neuroscientific concepts and clinical significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198627
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2000 May;25(3):391-414
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
G. Lundborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Hand Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2000 May;25(3):391-414
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anastomosis, Surgical
Animals
Female
Hand Injuries - surgery
Humans
Male
Nerve Regeneration - physiology
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Peripheral Nerves - physiology - surgery
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Sweden
Abstract
In spite of an enormous amount of new experimental laboratory data based on evolving neuroscientific concepts during the last 25 years peripheral nerve injuries still belong to the most challenging and difficult surgical reconstructive problems. Our understanding of biological mechanisms regulating posttraumatic nerve regeneration has increased substantially with respect to the role of neurotrophic and neurite-outgrowth promoting substances, but new molecular biological knowledge has so far gained very limited clinical applications. Techniques for clinical approximation of severed nerve ends have reached an optimal technical refinement and new concepts are needed to further increase the results from nerve repair. For bridging gaps in nerve continuity little has changed during the last 25 years. However, evolving principles for immunosuppression may open new perspectives regarding the use of nerve allografts, and various types of tissue engineering combined by bioartificial conduits may also be important. Posttraumatic functional reorganizations occurring in brain cortex are key phenomena explaining much of the inferior functional outcome following nerve repair, and increased knowledge regarding factors involved in brain plasticity may help to further improve the results. Implantation of microchips in the nervous system may provide a new interface between biology and technology and developing gene technology may introduce new possibilities in the manipulation of nerve degeneration and regeneration.
PubMed ID
10811744 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of 8 years of strict glycaemic control on peripheral nerve function in IDDM patients: the Oslo Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48461
Source
Diabetologia. 1994 Jun;37(6):579-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
K F Amthor
K. Dahl-Jørgensen
T J Berg
M S Heier
L. Sandvik
O. Aagenaes
K F Hanssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Diabetologia. 1994 Jun;37(6):579-84
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autonomic Pathways - physiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Neural Conduction
Norway
Peripheral Nerves - physiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We have investigated the effect of long-term strict glycaemic control on peripheral and autonomic nerve function in 45 IDDM patients (age 18-42 years, diabetes duration 7-23 years) without clinical signs of neuropathy or other neurological disease. They were randomly assigned to treatment either with continuous insulin infusion, multiple injections (4-6 times daily), or conventional treatment (twice daily) for 4 years and followed prospectively for 8 years. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were measured at the start and after 8 years. Autonomic nerve function tests were performed only once, after 8 years. A significant reduction of nerve conduction velocity was observed during 8 years in patients with mean HbA1 more than 10% (n = 12, group mean 10.9%, range 10.1-13.2%) compared to patients with HbA1 less than 10% (n = 33, group mean 9.0%, range 7.5-9.9%). Change of motor nerve conduction velocity in the peroneal nerve was: -4.8 +/- 4.9 (SD) vs -2.2 +/- 5.3 m/s (p
PubMed ID
7926342 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effects of cold exposure and exercise upon peripheral function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5335
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1972 May;24(5):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1972

Lack of collagen XV impairs peripheral nerve maturation and, when combined with laminin-411 deficiency, leads to basement membrane abnormalities and sensorimotor dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100185
Source
J Neurosci. 2010 Oct 27;30(43):14490-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2010
Author
Karolina Rasi
Merja Hurskainen
Mika Kallio
Saara Stavén
Raija Sormunen
Anthony M Heape
Robin L Avila
Daniel Kirschner
Anu Muona
Uolevi Tolonen
Heikki Tanila
Pirkko Huhtala
Raija Soininen
Taina Pihlajaniemi
Author Affiliation
Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oulu, and Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90221 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Neurosci. 2010 Oct 27;30(43):14490-501
Date
Oct-27-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Action Potentials - physiology
Animals
Axons - physiology - ultrastructure
Basement Membrane - physiology - ultrastructure
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Collagen - genetics - physiology
Electrophysiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Laminin - genetics - physiology
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Microscopy, Immunoelectron
Motor Neurons - physiology
Myelin Sheath - physiology
Nerve Fibers, Unmyelinated - physiology
Neural Conduction - physiology
Peripheral Nerves - physiology - ultrastructure
Physical Stimulation
Reflex - physiology
Sensory Receptor Cells - physiology
Sensory Thresholds - physiology
Somatosensory Disorders - genetics - physiopathology
X-Ray Diffraction
Abstract
Although the Schwann cell basement membrane (BM) is required for normal Schwann cell terminal differentiation, the role of BM-associated collagens in peripheral nerve maturation is poorly understood. Collagen XV is a BM zone component strongly expressed in peripheral nerves, and we show that its absence in mice leads to loosely packed axons in C-fibers and polyaxonal myelination. The simultaneous lack of collagen XV and another peripheral nerve component affecting myelination, laminin a4, leads to severely impaired radial sorting and myelination, and the maturation of the nerve is permanently compromised, contrasting with the slow repair observed in Lama4-/- single knock-out mice. Moreover, the Col15a1-/-;Lama4-/- double knock-out (DKO) mice initially lack C-fibers and, even over 1 year of age have only a few, abnormal C-fibers. The Lama4-/- knock-out results in motor and tactile sensory impairment, which is exacerbated by a simultaneous Col15a1-/- knock-out, whereas sensitivity to heat-induced pain is increased in the DKO mice. Lack of collagen XV results in slower sensory nerve conduction, whereas the Lama4-/- and DKO mice exhibit increased sensory nerve action potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials; x-ray diffraction revealed less mature myelin in the sciatic nerves of the latter than in controls. Ultrastructural analyses revealed changes in the Schwann cell BM in all three mutants, ranging from severe (DKO) to nearly normal (Col15a1-/-). Collagen XV thus contributes to peripheral nerve maturation and C-fiber formation, and its simultaneous deletion from neural BM zones with laminin a4 leads to a DKO phenotype distinct from those of both single knock-outs.
PubMed ID
20980607 View in PubMed
Less detail

[On the effect of hypothermia on excitability of the vascular interoceptors.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57352
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1961;7:221-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1961
Author
M A KONDRATOVICH
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1961;7:221-5
Date
1961
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Vessels - innervation
Peripheral Nerves - physiology
PubMed ID
13752930 View in PubMed
Less detail

Physiological adaptation to cold of peripheral nerve in the leg of the herring gull (Larus argentatus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301695
Source
American Journal of Physiology. 1953 Mar;172(3):639-44.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1953

7 records – page 1 of 1.