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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Analysis of upper and lower extremity peripheral nerve injuries in a population of patients with multiple injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205009
Source
J Trauma. 1998 Jul;45(1):116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
J. Noble
C A Munro
V S Prasad
R. Midha
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1998 Jul;45(1):116-22
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Arm Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - complications
Ontario - epidemiology
Peripheral Nerve Injuries
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Trauma Centers
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, cause, severity, and patterns of associated injuries of limb peripheral nerve injuries sustained by patients with multiple injuries seen at a regional Level 1 trauma center.
Patients sustaining injuries to the radial, median, ulnar, sciatic, femoral, peroneal, or tibial nerves were identified using a prospectively collected computerized database, maintained by Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, and a detailed chart review was undertaken.
From a trauma population of 5,777 patients treated between January 1, 1986, and November 30, 1996, 162 patients were identified as having an injury to at least one of the peripheral nerves of interest, yielding a prevalence of 2.8%. These 162 patients sustained a total of 200 peripheral nerve injuries, 121 of which were in the upper extremity. The mean patient age was 34.6 years (SEM +/- 1.1 year), and 83% of patients were male. The mean injury severity score was 23.1 (+/-0.90), and the mean length of hospital stay was 28 days (+/-1.8).
Motor vehicles crashes predominated (46%) as the cause of injury. The most frequently injured nerve was the radial nerve (58 injuries), and in the lower limb, the peroneal nerve was most commonly injured (39 injuries). Diagnosis of a peripheral nerve injury was made within 4 days of admission to Sunnybrook Health Science Centre in 78% of the cases. Surgery was required to treat 54% of patients. Head injuries were the most common associated injury, occurring in 60% of patients. Other common associated injuries included fractures and dislocations. The present report aims to aid in identification and treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.
PubMed ID
9680023 View in PubMed
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[A new treatment demanding cooperation between orthopedist and anethesiologist].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250154
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Feb 9;74(6):444-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-1977

Cold sensitivity and associated factors: a nested case-control study performed in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297605
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2018 10; 91(7):785-797
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2018
Author
Albin Stjernbrandt
Daniel Carlsson
Hans Pettersson
Ingrid Liljelind
Tohr Nilsson
Jens Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. albin.stjernbrandt@umu.se.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2018 10; 91(7):785-797
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cold Injury - epidemiology - etiology
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - complications
Obesity - complications
Peripheral Nerve Injuries - complications
Rheumatic Diseases - complications
Somatosensory Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vascular Diseases - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify factors associated with the reporting of cold sensitivity, by comparing cases to controls with regard to anthropometry, previous illnesses and injuries, as well as external exposures such as hand-arm vibration (HAV) and ambient cold.
Through a questionnaire responded to by the general population, ages 18-70, living in Northern Sweden (N?=?12,627), cold sensitivity cases (N?=?502) and matched controls (N?=?1004) were identified, and asked to respond to a second questionnaire focusing on different aspects of cold sensitivity as well as individual and external exposure factors suggested to be related to the condition. Conditional logistic regression analyses were performed to determine statistical significance.
In total, 997 out of 1506 study subjects answered the second questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 81.7%. In the multiple conditional logistic regression model, identified associated factors among cold sensitive cases were: frostbite affecting the hands (OR 10.3, 95% CI 5.5-19.3); rheumatic disease (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7-5.7); upper extremity nerve injury (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-3.0); migraines (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.3); and vascular disease (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-2.9). A body mass index?=?25 was inversely related to reporting of cold sensitivity (0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.6).
Cold sensitivity was associated with both individual and external exposure factors. Being overweight was associated with a lower occurrence of cold sensitivity; and among the acquired conditions, both cold injuries, rheumatic diseases, nerve injuries, migraines and vascular diseases were associated with the reporting of cold sensitivity.
PubMed ID
29808434 View in PubMed
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[Complications and side-effects of acupuncture]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53459
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jul-Aug;(5-6):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
V D Musiienko
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jul-Aug;(5-6):7-10
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Analgesia
Acupuncture Therapy - adverse effects
Blood Vessels - injuries
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology
English Abstract
Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Needlestick Injuries - complications
Peripheral Nerves - injuries
Pneumothorax - etiology
Spinal Cord Injuries - etiology
Viscera - injuries
Abstract
In the review of the literature, an analysis of complications and adverse effects of acupuncture is given, ways for their prevention are outlined.
PubMed ID
14618792 View in PubMed
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Digital nerve injuries: epidemiology, results, costs, and impact on daily life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123571
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2012 Sep;46(3-4):184-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Frida Thorsén
Hans-Eric Rosberg
Katarina Steen Carlsson
Lars B Dahlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Hand Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2012 Sep;46(3-4):184-90
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Finger Injuries - economics - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Fingers - innervation
Health Expenditures
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Nerve Injuries - economics - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Sick Leave - economics
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Epidemiology, results of treatment, impact on activity of daily living (ADL), and costs for treatment of digital nerve injuries have not been considered consistently. Case notes of patients of 0-99 years of age living in Malmö municipality, Sweden, who presented with a digital nerve injury and were referred to the Department of Hand Surgery in 1995-2005 were analysed retrospectively. The incidence was 6.2/100 000 inhabitants and year. Most commonly men (75%; median age 29 years) were injured. Isolated nerve injuries and concomitant tendon injuries were equally common. The direct costs (hospital stay, operation, outpatient visits, visits to a nurse and/or a hand therapist) for a concomitant tendon injury was almost double compared with an isolated digital nerve injury (6136 EUR [range, 744-29 689 EUR] vs 2653 EUR [range, 468-6949 EUR]). More than 50% of the patients who worked were injured at work and 79% lost time from work (median 59 days [range 3-337]). Permanent nerve dysfunction for the individual patient with ADL problems and subjective complaints of fumbleness, cold sensitivity, and pain occur in the patients despite surgery. It is concluded that digital nerve injuries, often considered as a minor injury and that affect young people at productive age, cause costs, and disability. Focus should be directed against prevention of the injury and to improve nerve regeneration from different aspects.
PubMed ID
22686434 View in PubMed
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The DQB1 *03:02 HLA haplotype is associated with increased risk of chronic pain after inguinal hernia surgery and lumbar disc herniation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117263
Source
Pain. 2013 Mar;154(3):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Cecilia A Dominguez
Maija Kalliomäki
Ulf Gunnarsson
Aurora Moen
Gabriel Sandblom
Ingrid Kockum
Ewa Lavant
Tomas Olsson
Fred Nyberg
Lars Jørgen Rygh
Cecilie Røe
Johannes Gjerstad
Torsten Gordh
Fredrik Piehl
Author Affiliation
Neuroimmunology Unit, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. cecilia.dominguez@ki.se
Source
Pain. 2013 Mar;154(3):427-33
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Chronic Pain - etiology - genetics
Diskectomy
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
HLA-DQ beta-Chains - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
Hernia, Inguinal - physiopathology - surgery
Herniorrhaphy
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - physiopathology - surgery
Lumbar Vertebrae - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Neuralgia - etiology - genetics
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - genetics
Peripheral Nerve Injuries - etiology - genetics
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Neuropathic pain conditions are common after nerve injuries and are suggested to be regulated in part by genetic factors. We have previously demonstrated a strong genetic influence of the rat major histocompatibility complex on development of neuropathic pain behavior after peripheral nerve injury. In order to study if the corresponding human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) also influences susceptibility to pain, we performed an association study in patients that had undergone surgery for inguinal hernia (n=189). One group had developed a chronic pain state following the surgical procedure, while the control group had undergone the same type of operation, without any persistent pain. HLA DRB1genotyping revealed a significantly increased proportion of patients in the pain group carrying DRB1*04 compared to patients in the pain-free group. Additional typing of the DQB1 gene further strengthened the association; carriers of the DQB1*03:02 allele together with DRB1*04 displayed an increased risk of postsurgery pain with an odds risk of 3.16 (1.61-6.22) compared to noncarriers. This finding was subsequently replicated in the clinical material of patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=258), where carriers of the DQB1*03:02 allele displayed a slower recovery and increased pain. In conclusion, we here for the first time demonstrate that there is an HLA-dependent risk of developing pain after surgery or lumbar disc herniation; mediated by the DRB1*04 - DQB1*03:02 haplotype. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to fine-map the HLA effect and to address underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
23318129 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of elbow fracture in children: analysis of 355 fractures, with special reference to supracondylar humerus fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32055
Source
J Orthop Sci. 2001;6(4):312-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
S. Houshian
B. Mehdi
M S Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics and Radiology, Esbjerg County Hospital, DK-6700 Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
J Orthop Sci. 2001;6(4):312-5
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Elbow Joint - injuries
Female
Humans
Humeral Fractures - classification - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Male
Peripheral Nerves - injuries
Radius Fractures - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
We present a study of the pattern of elbow fractures in children under 15 years of age, during a 5-year period, with special reference to supracondylar humerus fractures. The incidence was 308/100 000 per year; 58% of the children had a fracture in the supracondylar area of the humerus. There were 355 elbow fractures, and there were 164 boys (46%) and 191 girls (54%). The mean age for the entire group was 7.9 years (for boys, 7.2 years; for girls, 8.5 years). Of 209 supracondylar fractures (including 5 combination fractures), 134 were type I, 40 were type II, and 35 were type III (as classified by Gartland). Associated temporary nerve injuries involving the median, radial, and ulnar nerves were seen in 15 patients with type III supracondylar fractures. Associated brachial artery injuries were seen in 6 patients, 5 of whom had type III fractures.
PubMed ID
11479758 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of Flexor Tendon Injuries of the Hand in a Northern Finnish Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292023
Source
Scand J Surg. 2017 Sep; 106(3):278-282
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
M Manninen
T Karjalainen
J Määttä
T Flinkkilä
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2017 Sep; 106(3):278-282
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - epidemiology - surgery
Neurosurgical Procedures
Orthopedic Procedures
Peripheral Nerve Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Tendon Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Young Adult
Abstract
Flexor tendon injuries cause significant morbidity in working-age population. The epidemiology of these injuries in adult population is not well known. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of flexor tendon injuries in a Northern Finnish population.
Data on flexor tendon injuries, from 2004 to 2010, were retrieved from patient records from four hospitals, which offer surgical repair of the flexor tendon injuries in a well-defined area in Northern Finland. The incidence of flexor tendon injury as well as the gender-specific incidence rates was calculated. Mechanism of injury, concomitant nerve injuries, and re-operations were also recorded.
The incidence rate of flexor tendon injury was 7.0/100,000 person-years. The incidence was higher in men and inversely related to age. The most common finger to be affected was the fifth digit. In 37% of injuries also digital nerve was affected. The most common finger to have simultaneous digital nerve injury was the thumb.
Flexor tendon laceration is a relatively rare injury. It predominantly affects working-aged young males and frequently includes a nerve injury, which requires microsurgical skills from the surgeon performing the repair. This study describes epidemiology of flexor tendon injuries and therefore helps planning the surgical and rehabilitation services needed to address this entity.
PubMed ID
27550244 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.