Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Cost analysis of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18424
Source
Clin Lab Haematol. 2003 Jun;25(3):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
V. Mishra
S. Vaaler
L. Brinch
Author Affiliation
Health Professional Support Department, The Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. vinod.mishra@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Clin Lab Haematol. 2003 Jun;25(3):179-84
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cryopreservation - economics
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - economics - therapy
Nursing Care
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Prospective Studies
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support is a common but expensive treatment for various hematological malignancies. A prospective cost analysis of evaluation/mobilization and the HDC + PBSC phase for patients with multiple myeloma was performed. Eleven consecutive patients at the National University Hospital Oslo, taking part in a Nordic treatment protocol, were included in the analysis during the period from May 1999 to December 2000. Clinical and resource use data were obtained prospectively on a daily basis registration and from patient records.The total cost for the evaluation/mobilization and the HDC + PBSC phase varied from 22,999 US dollars to 61,722 US dollars (mean 38,186 US dollars; median 30,569 US dollars). The mean length of hospital stay for the evaluation/mobilization phase was 8 days (range 4-17 days) and for the HDC + PBSC phase 19 days (range 14-29 days). A statistically significant correlation was found between the length of hospital stay and hospital costs for both phases (P
PubMed ID
12755795 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: the Norwegian experience from a multicenter cost study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174911
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Jun;35(12):1149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
V. Mishra
S. Andresen
L. Brinch
S. Kvaløy
P. Ernst
M K Lønset
J M Tangen
J. Wikelund
C. Flatum
E. Baggerød
B. Helle
S. Vaaler
T P Hagen
Author Affiliation
Health Professional Support Department, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. vinod.mishra@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Jun;35(12):1149-53
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cryopreservation - economics
Cytapheresis - economics
Financing, Government
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Norway
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Prospective Studies
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
High-dose therapy with autologous blood progenitor cell support is now routinely used for patients with certain malignant lymphomas and multiple myeloma. We performed a prospective cost analysis of the mobilization, harvesting and cryopreservation phases and the high-dose therapy with stem cell reinfusion and hospitalization phases. In total, 40 consecutive patients were studied at four different university hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data on direct costs were obtained on a daily basis. Data on indirect costs were allocated to the specific patient based on estimates of relevant department costs (ie the service department's costs), and by means of predefined allocation keys. All cost data were calculated at 2001 prices. The mean total costs for the two phases were US$ 32,160 (range US$ 19,092-50,550). The mean total length of hospital stay for two phases was 31 days (range 27-37). A large part of the actual cost in the harvest phase was attributed to stem cell mobilization, including growth factors, harvesting and cryopreservation. In the high-dose chemotherapy phase, the most significant part of the costs was nursing staff. Average total costs were considerably higher than actual DRG-based reimbursement from the government, indicating that the treatment of these patients was heavily subsidized by the basic hospital grants.
PubMed ID
15880133 View in PubMed
Less detail