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285 records – page 1 of 29.

A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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[A dental field investigation in Hailuoto. 2. Oral hygiene and periodontal conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110903
Source
Suom Hammaslaak Toim. 1968;64(4):162-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

Adolescents with high periodontal risk in Public Dental Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117774
Source
Swed Dent J. 2013;37(4):161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Leif Jansson
Lottie Adler
Catarina Jonés
Source
Swed Dent J. 2013;37(4):161-9
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggressive Periodontitis - etiology - therapy
Chronic Periodontitis - etiology - therapy
Dental Caries - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Attachment Loss - etiology - therapy
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - etiology - therapy
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of adolescents with high periodontal risk and to identify factors with influence on the decision to refer a patient to a specialist clinic of Periodontology, on compliance rate and on treatment outcome. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective study on adolescents at age 13-17. In total, clinical examinations and risk evaluations according to caries- and periodontal risk were performed on 50347 adolescents in general dentistry at ages 13, 15 and 17 in 2007. Individuals with a high periodontal risk were included in the present investigation. A high periodontal risk was defined as presence of sites with periodontal pocket depths >6mm and loss of periodontal tissue support. Multiple logistic regression analyses were adopted to calculate the influence of the potential predictors on the investigated dependent variables. In total, 0.5% of the adolescents were found to have high periodontal risk. The diagnosis local periodontitis and the number of periodontal pockets with probing depths >6 mm were positively and significantly correlated to referral to a periodontist. Eighteen percent dropped out before the treatment was completed. Smokers had a significantly lower compliance than non-smokers. The success rate was significantly lower for individuals with many periodontal pockets and for those with the diagnosis local periodontitis. The prevalence of adolescents classified as having high periodontal risk was low. A large frequency of subjects dropped out before the periodontal treatment was completed, especially at the specialist clinics.
PubMed ID
24620506 View in PubMed
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An estimation of dental treatment needs in two groups of refugees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73761
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Jun;48(3):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
M. Zimmerman
R. Bornstein
T. Martinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Jun;48(3):175-82
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chile - ethnology
Dental Care
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Poland - ethnology
Refugees
Root Canal Therapy
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate dental treatment need in groups of Chilean and Polish refugees in Sweden. Of the Nordic countries, Sweden accepts the greatest number of refugees. An average of 5000 refugees arrived annually in 1981-85, increasing to 15,000 during 1986-87. Refugees and their families now comprise 93% of non-Nordic immigration. In 1981-83 a sample of 193 Chilean and 92 Polish refugees in the county of Stockholm was selected for this study. Dental treatment needs were calculated in accordance with CPITN and the working study of Swedish dentistry, which formed the basis for the Swedish scale of dental fees for the National Dental Insurance Scheme. The estimated mean treatment time (+/- SD) in the Chilean sample was 6.9 +/- 2.3 h and in the Polish group 8.4 +/- 3.0; in comparison with estimated treatment needs in a Swedish material, both would be classified as extreme risk groups. There was no correlation between the number of months in Sweden and the estimated treatment needs. The results indicate a cumulative, unmet need for dental care in these groups. Barriers to ensuring adequate health care for immigrants persist; special outreach programmes, conducted by dental health personnel, may be an effective means of introducing immigrants to the Swedish dental care system.
PubMed ID
2195841 View in PubMed
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Application of the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in a group of Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236514
Source
Oral Health. 1986 Oct;76(10):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986

[A program for the mass prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases in the pediatric population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234075
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1988 Jan-Feb;67(1):78-9
Publication Type
Article

Are the barriers to good oral hygiene in nursing homes within the nurses or the patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130225
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Tril Willumsen
Line Karlsen
Richard Naess
Sissel Bjørntvedt
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Services' Competence East (TKØ), Norway. tiril@odont.uio.no
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Education, Nursing
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Homes
Oral Hygiene - education - nursing
Patient compliance
Periodontal Index
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
To explore nursing home patients' oral hygiene and their nurses' assessments of barriers to improvement.
In nursing homes, nurses are responsible for patients' oral hygiene.
This study assessed the oral hygiene of 358 patients in 11 Norwegian nursing homes. 494 nurses in the same nursing homes participated in a questionnaire study.
More than 40% of patients had unacceptable oral hygiene. 'More than 10 teeth' gave OR = 2, 1 (p = 0.013) and 'resist being helped' OR = 2.5 (p = 0.018) for unacceptable oral hygiene. Eighty percent of the nurses believed knowledge of oral health was important, and 9.1% often considered taking care of patients' teeth unpleasant. Half of the nurses reported lack of time to give regular oral care, and 97% experienced resistant behaviour in patients. Resistant behaviour often left oral care undone. Twenty-one percent of the nurses had considered making legal decisions about use of force or restraints to overcome resistance to teeth cleaning.
Oral hygiene in the nursing homes needed to be improved. Resistant behaviour is a major barrier. To overcome this barrier nurses' education, organisational strategies to provide more time for oral care, and coping with resistant behaviour in patients are important factors.
PubMed ID
22023222 View in PubMed
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Assessment of periodontal treatment needs among adults with diabetes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190191
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
A. Karikoski
H. Murtomaa
P. Ilanne-Parikka
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Calculus - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - classification
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
People with diabetes have a high risk for periodontal disease, which can be considered one of the complications of diabetes. We evaluated periodontal treatment needs using the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in relation to diabetes-related factors and oral hygiene.
The sample consisted of 120 dentate diabetics, all of whom were regular patients at the Salo Regional Hospital Diabetes Clinic. The nurses, who interviewed the patients, collected data on duration and type of diabetes, complications, and HbA1c level. Clinical periodontal examination included identification of visible plaque, the presence of calculus and use of the CPITN.
The CPITN score 3 was the most prevalent. According to the logistic regression model, poor metabolic control was significantly related to pathologic pockets. No significant association was found between diabetes-related factors and the highest individual CPITN score of 4, which was, in turn, significantly associated with extensive calculus.
Excessive periodontal treatment needs found, indicate that current dental care may be insufficient in adults with diabetes. Oral health among high-risk groups, especially those with poor metabolic control, should be promoted by collaboration between dental and health care professionals involved in diabetes care.
PubMed ID
12013254 View in PubMed
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Assessment of single risk indicators in relation to caries increment in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34844
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Apr;54(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
M. Raitio
K. Pienihäkkinen
A. Scheinin
Author Affiliation
Oulu Municipal Health Center, Dental Health Care, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Apr;54(2):113-7
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Candida - isolation & purification
Child
Colony Count, Microbial
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Caries Activity Tests
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Male
Odds Ratio
Periodontal Index
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Saliva - enzymology - microbiology - secretion
Sex Factors
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Abstract
Base-line data on a series of risk indicators were related to 11-month caries increment in 181 subjects with a mean age of 13 years and 3 months. A caries increment equalling or exceeding one tooth surface was recorded in 21% of the subjects. The risk indicators consisted of past caries experience, white spot lesions, visible plaque and gingivitis, and six salivary tests: secretion rate, buffer effect, sucrase, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and Candida. Significant associations between caries increment and past caries experience (p = 0.002), white spot lesions (p = 0.01), lactobacilli (p = 0.02), Candida (p = 0.006), and sucrase (p = 0.02) were observed. The ensuing odds ratios were thus recorded: past caries experience, 3.6; white spot lesions, 2.9; salivary sucrase activity, 2.9; lactobacilli, 2.5; and Candida, 2.8.
PubMed ID
8739143 View in PubMed
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285 records – page 1 of 29.