Skip header and navigation

Refine By

37 records – page 1 of 4.

A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of the work of the periodontics offices of Moscow dental polyclinics and recommendations for its improvement].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235526
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1987 Mar-Apr;66(2):74-6
Publication Type
Article

An estimation of dental treatment needs in two groups of refugees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73761
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Jun;48(3):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
M. Zimmerman
R. Bornstein
T. Martinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Jun;48(3):175-82
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chile - ethnology
Dental Care
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Poland - ethnology
Refugees
Root Canal Therapy
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate dental treatment need in groups of Chilean and Polish refugees in Sweden. Of the Nordic countries, Sweden accepts the greatest number of refugees. An average of 5000 refugees arrived annually in 1981-85, increasing to 15,000 during 1986-87. Refugees and their families now comprise 93% of non-Nordic immigration. In 1981-83 a sample of 193 Chilean and 92 Polish refugees in the county of Stockholm was selected for this study. Dental treatment needs were calculated in accordance with CPITN and the working study of Swedish dentistry, which formed the basis for the Swedish scale of dental fees for the National Dental Insurance Scheme. The estimated mean treatment time (+/- SD) in the Chilean sample was 6.9 +/- 2.3 h and in the Polish group 8.4 +/- 3.0; in comparison with estimated treatment needs in a Swedish material, both would be classified as extreme risk groups. There was no correlation between the number of months in Sweden and the estimated treatment needs. The results indicate a cumulative, unmet need for dental care in these groups. Barriers to ensuring adequate health care for immigrants persist; special outreach programmes, conducted by dental health personnel, may be an effective means of introducing immigrants to the Swedish dental care system.
PubMed ID
2195841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in a group of Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236514
Source
Oral Health. 1986 Oct;76(10):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986

Assessment of periodontal treatment needs among adults with diabetes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190191
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
A. Karikoski
H. Murtomaa
P. Ilanne-Parikka
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Calculus - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - classification
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
People with diabetes have a high risk for periodontal disease, which can be considered one of the complications of diabetes. We evaluated periodontal treatment needs using the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in relation to diabetes-related factors and oral hygiene.
The sample consisted of 120 dentate diabetics, all of whom were regular patients at the Salo Regional Hospital Diabetes Clinic. The nurses, who interviewed the patients, collected data on duration and type of diabetes, complications, and HbA1c level. Clinical periodontal examination included identification of visible plaque, the presence of calculus and use of the CPITN.
The CPITN score 3 was the most prevalent. According to the logistic regression model, poor metabolic control was significantly related to pathologic pockets. No significant association was found between diabetes-related factors and the highest individual CPITN score of 4, which was, in turn, significantly associated with extensive calculus.
Excessive periodontal treatment needs found, indicate that current dental care may be insufficient in adults with diabetes. Oral health among high-risk groups, especially those with poor metabolic control, should be promoted by collaboration between dental and health care professionals involved in diabetes care.
PubMed ID
12013254 View in PubMed
Less detail

Awareness of dental disorders and discrepancy between "objective" and "subjective" dental treatment needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75824
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;16(6):345-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
T. Tervonen
M. Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;16(6):345-8
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dentures
Finland
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Tooth Diseases - therapy
Abstract
A dental health survey including an interview, a questionnaire and a clinical examination was conducted among adults aged 25, 35, 50, and 65 yr in Ostrobothnia, Finland. A total of 1275 subjects, 80% of the sample, participated in the clinical examination. 40% of the subjects with at least one dentate sextant had noticed gingival bleeding, 16% gingival inflammation, 20% "gum disease", and 70% at least one decayed tooth. When objectively assessed, a total of 98% had a maximum CPITN code 1-4, 38% a maximum CPITN code 3-4 and 76% were deemed to be in need of fillings. Dentures were objectively non-acceptable in 64% of wearers and subjectively so in 42%. A need for replacing missing teeth was expressed by 14% of the total sample, whereas according to "objective" assessment, 23% had such a need. It is concluded that people tend to underestimate their dental treatment needs, the discrepancy being most distinct in the field of periodontology. Sufficient emphasis should thus be given to improving people's awareness and knowledge of their own dental disorders.
PubMed ID
3060309 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Balneotherapy of periodontosis at Gelendzhik health resort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245128
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1981 Jan-Feb;60(1):86-7
Publication Type
Article

Canadian Academy of Periodontology endorses importance of NIH study on Keyes method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238986
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1985 Apr;51(4):285-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1985

Can a prenatal dental public health program make a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135131
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Diana Louise Lin
Rosamund Harrison
Jolanta Aleksejuniene
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. dianallin@aol.com
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Birth weight
British Columbia
Dental Care
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Oral Hygiene Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Personal Satisfaction
Poverty
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Public Health Dentistry
Self Report
Abstract
Some pregnant women may be at increased risk of poor oral health. A publicly funded prenatal dental program in Vancouver, British Columbia, called Healthiest Babies Possible (HBP), has been providing oral health education and limited clinical services for over 20 years to low-income women assessed to be at high risk of preterm or low-weight births. This report is an assessment of the initial outcomes.
A prospective before-after evaluation of a non-probability convenience sample of women was undertaken over 1 year (2005-2006). Participants were seen at the customary 2 clinic visits, and were asked to return for a postnatal visit. Data collected by an inside evaluator, the program's dental hygienist, included questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, observations, clinical indices, appointment statistics and self-reports. Univariate and bivariate analyses (Student's t test and ANOVA) were performed.
Of the 67 women in the sample, 61 agreed to participate; 36 (59%) attended all 3 appointments at the clinic, and 40 (66%) completed all 3 interviews and questionnaires either at the clinic or by telephone. Clinical indices of gingival health improved significantly over the time of the evaluation. Improvements in tooth cleaning were demonstrated by a significant decrease in plaque (p
PubMed ID
21507285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community periodontal index of treatment needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233866
Source
Can J Community Dent. 1988;3(2):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

37 records – page 1 of 4.