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234 records – page 1 of 24.

A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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[A dental field investigation in Hailuoto. 2. Oral hygiene and periodontal conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110903
Source
Suom Hammaslaak Toim. 1968;64(4):162-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
E. Rea
G. Thompson
M E Moffatt
T K Young
J. O'Neil
A. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Dental Health Services - organization & administration
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In 1990, as part of a major health status assessment, a dental survey was carried out on a 20 per cent random sample of the adult population in the Keewatin region of the Northwest Territories. A 73 per cent response rate was obtained. Of the 397 people examined, 334 (88 per cent) identified themselves as Inuit. More than 20 per cent of the respondents were edentulous, including 10 per cent of those 18 to 34 years old. The median DMFT was 24 for all respondents and 21 for dentulous respondents. There was a significant difference between Inuit and non-Inuit respondents, which was most marked in the 18 to 34 year old age group (mean DMFT 22.1 versus 15.6, p
PubMed ID
8453514 View in PubMed
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Adult diabetic and nondiabetic subjects as users of dental services. A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215505
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Apr;53(2):112-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
L. Pohjamo
T. Tervonen
M. Knuuttila
H. Nurkkala
Author Affiliation
Raahe Health Centre, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Apr;53(2):112-4
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - economics - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis - utilization
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Utilization of dental services by 30 diabetic and 30 nondiabetic subjects was assessed by longitudinal monitoring over a period of 3 years. All subjects were examined clinically three times, and their treatment consisted mainly of cariologic and periodontal treatment. The treatment was delivered by a dentist and an expanded-duty dental hygienist. The study groups were similar with regard to the total number of dental visits needed. However, the treatment of diabetic subjects was more demanding in that more dentist's workload was needed for the diabetic group. They also missed more appointments without cancellation and therefore more office time had to be reserved for them.
PubMed ID
7610774 View in PubMed
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[A radiographic and clinical investigation of loss of attachment in the first molar in 15-year-old children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41434
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1979 Feb;83(4):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1979

Association between clinical and subjective indicators of oral health status in an older adult population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216839
Source
Gerodontology. 1994 Dec;11(2):108-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
D. Locker
G. Slade
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry and Community, Dental Health Services Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Gerodontology. 1994 Dec;11(2):108-14
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
DMF Index
Dental Care for Aged - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Periodontal Index
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Since the mid-1970s a number of investigators have developed measures of the extent to which oral disorders compromise functional, social and psychological well-being. They have also examined the associations between clinical indicators of oral health status and these subjective indicators. In general, these associations have been inconsistent and weak. One reason for this might be that the subjective indicators employed were rudimentary and insensitive to the health outcomes of oral disorders. The development of the Oral Health Impact Profile, a more sophisticated measure of the health outcomes of oral disorders, provided a method to examine this hypothesis. Using data from an oral health survey of older adults, we examined the associations between OHIP scores and a variety of clinical indicators of tooth loss, caries and periodontal disease. Even with this measure the associations were predominantly weak, the strongest of the correlations being 0.53. We also examined the influence of personal and sociodemographic characteristics on the relationship between tooth loss and its psychosocial outcomes. Five variables reflecting expectations and resources explained as much variance in OHIP scores as did the number of missing teeth. This analysis illustrates the essential distinction between disease and health and the way in which measures of oral health can be used to pursue fundamental issues in behavioural science and health services research.
PubMed ID
7750964 View in PubMed
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Association between level of education and oral health status in 35-, 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61608
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2003 Aug;30(8):697-704
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
J. Paulander
P. Axelsson
J. Lindhe
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy of Göteborg University, Sweden. jorgen.paulander@liv.se
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2003 Aug;30(8):697-704
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet
Educational Status
Humans
Mastication
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between educational level and dental disease, treatment needs and oral hygiene habits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Randomized samples of 35-, 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds, classified according to the educational level: [low (LE): elementary school or higher (HE)], were identified. In 1091 subjects, a number of characteristics such as (i) number of teeth, (ii) periodontal attachment levels (PAL), (iii) caries and (iv) occlusal function were recorded. Educational level, oral hygiene and dietary habits were self-reported. Non-parametric variables were analyzed by chi2, Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon's rank sum tests, and parametric variables by Student's t-test (level of significance 95%). A two-way anova was performed on decayed, missing and filled surfaces to investigate the interaction between age and educational level. All statistical procedures were performed in the SPSS statistical package. RESULTS: The number of remaining teeth was similar for LE and HE in the 35-year olds (25.8 versus 26.6), but in the older age groups LE had significantly a larger number of missing teeth. The LE groups (except in 65-year olds) exhibited significantly more PAL loss. LE had significantly fewer healthy gingival units in all but the 75-year age group. In all age groups, LE had fewer intact tooth surfaces and a significantly poorer occlusal function. The frequency of tooth cleaning measures and dietary habits did not differ between LE and HE. CONCLUSION: Educational level was shown to influence the oral conditions and should be considered in assessing risk, and in planning appropriate preventive measures.
PubMed ID
12887338 View in PubMed
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The association of depression and anxiety with dental caries and periodontal disease among Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275072
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;43(6):540-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Elsa K Delgado-Angulo
Wael Sabbah
Anna L Suominen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Matti Knuuttila
Timo Partonen
Anne Nordblad
Aubrey Sheiham
Richard G Watt
Georgios Tsakos
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;43(6):540-9
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore the association of depression and anxiety with two oral health outcomes, dental caries and periodontal disease and assess possible mediators for any of the associations.
Secondary analysis of the Finnish Health 2000 Survey. Depression was assessed with Beck's Depression Inventory and anxiety with Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Number of decayed teeth included carious lesions reaching dentine; periodontal disease was number of teeth with periodontal pockets of 4 mm or deeper. Third molars were excluded. The association of mental disorders and oral health was tested in regression models adjusted for confounders and potential mediators.
Depression was associated with number of decayed teeth only among 35- to 54-year-olds. The association between anxiety and the number of decayed teeth was not statistically significant. Depression and periodontal pocketing were not significantly associated.
Depression was significantly associated with number of decayed teeth only among participants aged 35-54 old and not with other age groups. Neither depression nor anxiety was significantly related to periodontal disease.
PubMed ID
26130047 View in PubMed
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234 records – page 1 of 24.