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1652 records – page 1 of 166.

A 6-year nationwide cohort study of glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes. Risk markers for the development of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32420
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Olsen
A. Sjølie
P. Hougaard
J. Johannesen
K. Borch-Johnsen
K. Marinelli
B. Thorsteinsson
S. Pramming
H B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Perception
Probability
Risk factors
Vibration
Abstract
The study aimed to identify risk markers (present at the start of the study in 1989) for the occurrence and progression of microvascular complications 6 years later (in 1995) in a Danish nationwide cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (average age at entry 13.7 years). Probabilities for the development of elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), retinopathy, and increased vibration perception threshold (VPT) could then be estimated from a stepwise logistic regression model. A total of 339 patients (47% of the original cohort) were studied. Sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen and dose, height, weight, HbA(1c), blood pressure, and AER were recorded. In addition, information on retinopathy, neuropathy (VPT), and anti-hypertensive treatment was obtained at the end of the study. HbA(1c) (normal range 4.3-5.8, mean 5.3%) and AER (upper normal limit or =20 microg min(-1)) was found in 12.8% of the patients in 1995, and risk markers for this were increased AER and high HbA(1c), in 1989 (both p6.5 V) was found in 62.5% of patients in 1995, for which the risk markers were male sex (p
PubMed ID
11120452 View in PubMed
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A 15-Year Follow-Up Study of Sense of Humor and Causes of Mortality: The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284817
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Solfrid Romundstad
Sven Svebak
Are Holen
Jostein Holmen
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cognition
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infection - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Protective factors
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Perception
Wit and Humor as Topic
Abstract
Associations between the sense of humor and survival in relation to specific diseases has so far never been studied.
We conducted a 15-year follow-up study of 53,556 participants in the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway. Cognitive, social, and affective components of the sense of humor were obtained, and associations with all-cause mortality, mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), infections, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs).
After multivariate adjustments, high scores on the cognitive component of the sense of humor were significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality in women (HR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.33-0.81), but not in men (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.59-1.32). Mortality due to CVD was significantly lower in women with high scores on the cognitive component (HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.15-0.47), and so was mortality due to infections both in men (HR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.09-0.74) and women (HR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.04-0.76). The social and affective components of the sense of humor were not associated with mortality. In the total population, the positive association between the cognitive component of sense of humor and survival was present until the age of 85 years.
The cognitive component of the sense of humor is positively associated with survival from mortality related to CVD and infections in women and with infection-related mortality in men. The findings indicate that sense of humor is a health-protecting cognitive coping resource.
PubMed ID
26569539 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Report
Date
2000
  1 website  
Author
Alaska HIV Prevention Planning Group
State of Alaska HIV/STD Program, DPH, Section of Epidemiology
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska AIDS cases
Chlamydia
Epidemiologic profile
Exposure risk
Gonorrhea
Hepatitis C infection
HIV/AIDS
IDU (injection drug use)
MSM (men who have sex with men)
Needs Assessment
Populations at risk
Risk behavior
Risk perception
Ryan White CARE Act (RWCA) services
Sexually transmitted diseases
Sociodemographics of Alaska
Syphilis
Abstract
The 2001-2003 Alaska HIV Prevention Plan describes the HIV epidemic in Alaska, provides information on populations at increased risk of infection, and recommends strategies to prevent further spread of HIV in Alaska. The HIV Prevention Plan also serves to guide uses of HIV prevention funds from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) within our state. This plan differs from previous plans developed by the Alaska HIV Prevention Planning Group in that it is more geographically specific, it strongly emphasizes populations at high risk, and it recommends specific interventions to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in Alaska.
Online Resources
Less detail
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
  1 website  
Author
Alaska HIV Prevention Planning Group
State of Alaska HIV/STD Program, DPH, Section of Epidemiology
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Chlamydia
Community Services Assessment (CSA)
Epidemiologic profile
Gonorrhea
Hepatitis C virus infection
IDU (injection drug use)
MSM (men who have sex with men)
Partner notification
Prevention services
Risk behavior
Risk perception
Sexually transmitted diseases
Sociodemographics of Alaska
Substance use and abuse
Syphilis
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)
Abstract
The 2004-2006 Alaska HIV Prevention Plan is the fifth comprehensive plan produced by the Alaska HPPG. It describes the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Alaska and related risk factors, the populations at greatest need for HIV prevention interventions, and recommendations for interventions that are most appropriate to meet these needs. The Plan is designed to provide guidance for HIV prevention activities in all sectors and areas of Alaska for the next three years. It is intended to guide specific interventions for those at greatest risk of HIV infection; to generate community discussion and input; to encourage collaboration among individuals, organizations, and community groups providing HIV prevention and care; and to encourage integration of HIV prevention interventions into services for people likely to engage in risk behaviors -- all with the goal of preventing HIV and AIDS in Alaska.
Online Resources
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[2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The Nobel laureates have explored the internal GPS of the brain].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262625
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Oct 8-14;111(41):1766-7
Publication Type
Article

Abnormal brain processing in hepatic encephalopathy: evidence of cerebral reorganization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141910
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Rolf Ankerlund Blauenfeldt
Søren Schou Olesen
Jesper Bach Hansen
Carina Graversen
Asbjørn Mohr Drewes
Author Affiliation
Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Aged
Auditory Perception
Brain - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Brain Waves
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Electric Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Female
Functional Laterality
Hepatic Encephalopathy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Median Nerve - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Neural Conduction
Neuropsychological Tests
Photic Stimulation
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Time Factors
Abstract
Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe and frequent complication of liver cirrhosis characterized by abnormal cerebral function. Little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms in HE and human data are sparse. Electrophysiological methods such as evoked brain potentials after somatic stimuli can be combined with inverse modeling of the underlying brain activity. Thereby, information on neuronal dynamics and brain activity can be studied in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensory brain processing in patients with HE.
Twelve patients with minimal or overt HE and 26 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Cerebral sensory processing was investigated as (i) an auditory reaction time task; (ii) visual and somatosensory evoked brain potentials, and (iii) reconstruction of the underlying brain activity.
Somatosensory evoked potentials were reproducible (all P>0.05), whereas flash evoked potentials were not reproducible (all P
PubMed ID
20661140 View in PubMed
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About stereopsis and its significance to public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248094
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Nov-Dec;69 Suppl 1:75-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
W L Larson
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Nov-Dec;69 Suppl 1:75-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Depth Perception
Humans
Public Health
Vision Disorders
Visual perception
PubMed ID
737662 View in PubMed
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Absence of linkage of phonological coding dyslexia to chromosome 6p23-p21.3 in a large family data set.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204108
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Nov;63(5):1448-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
L L Field
B J Kaplan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgry, Alberta, Canada. field@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Nov;63(5):1448-56
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Alberta
Alleles
Auditory Perception
Child
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
Dyslexia - genetics - physiopathology
Europe - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genetic Linkage
Genetic markers
Genotype
Humans
Lod Score
Nuclear Family
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that a locus predisposing to specific reading disability (dyslexia) resides on chromosome 6p23-p21.3. We investigated 79 families having at least two siblings affected with phonological coding dyslexia, the most common form of reading disability (617 people genotyped, 294 affected), and we tested for linkage with the genetic markers reported to be linked to dyslexia in those studies. No evidence for linkage was found by LOD score analysis or affected-sib-pair methods. However, using the affected-pedigree-member (APM) method, we detected significant evidence for linkage and/or association with some markers when we used published allele frequencies with weighting of rarer alleles. APM results were not significant when we used marker allele frequencies estimated from parents. Furthermore, results were not significant with the more robust SIMIBD method using either published or parental marker frequencies. Finally, family-based association analysis using the AFBAC program showed no evidence for association with any marker. We conclude that the APM method should be used only with extreme caution, because it appears to have generated false-positive results. In summary, using a large data set with high power to detect linkage, we were unable to find evidence for linkage or association between phonological coding dyslexia and chromosome 6p markers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9792873 View in PubMed
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Academic performance of opposite-sex and same-sex twins in adolescence: A Danish national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265765
Source
Horm Behav. 2015 Mar;69:123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Linda Ahrenfeldt
Inge Petersen
Wendy Johnson
Kaare Christensen
Source
Horm Behav. 2015 Mar;69:123-31
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Androgens - blood
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Measurement - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Perception - physiology
Psychology, Adolescent
Sex Characteristics
Testosterone - blood
Twins - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Testosterone is an important hormone in the sexual differentiation of the brain, contributing to differences in cognitive abilities between males and females. For instance, studies in clinical populations such as females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) who are exposed to high levels of androgens in utero support arguments for prenatal testosterone effects on characteristics such as visuospatial cognition and behaviour. The comparison of opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) twin pairs can be used to help establish the role of prenatal testosterone. However, although some twin studies confirm a masculinizing effect of a male co-twin regarding for instance perception and cognition it remains unclear whether intra-uterine hormone transfer exists in humans. Our aim was to test the potential influences of testosterone on academic performance in OS twins. We compared ninth-grade test scores and teacher ratings of OS (n=1812) and SS (n=4054) twins as well as of twins and singletons (n=13,900) in mathematics, physics/chemistry, Danish, and English. We found that males had significantly higher test scores in mathematics than females (.06-.15 SD), whereas females performed better in Danish (.33-.49 SD), English (.20 SD), and neatness (.45-.64 SD). However, we did not find that OS females performed better in mathematics than SS and singleton females, nor did they perform worse either in Danish or English. Scores for OS and SS males were similar in all topics. In conclusion, this study did not provide evidence for a masculinization of female twins with male co-twins with regard to academic performance in adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25655669 View in PubMed
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Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123124
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech
Auditory Threshold
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Patient satisfaction
Perceptual Masking
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - rehabilitation
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Perception
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA).
ANL was measured in three conditions in both ears at two test sessions. Subjects completed the IOI-HA and the ANL questionnaire.
Sixty-three Danish hearing-aid users; fifty-seven subjects were full time users and 6 were part time/non users of hearing aids according to the ANL questionnaire.
ANLs were similar to results with American English speech material. The coefficient of repeatability (CR) was 6.5-8.8 dB. IOI-HA scores were not associated to ANL.
Danish and non-semantic ANL versions yield results similar to the American English version. The magnitude of the CR indicates that ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not suitable for prediction of individual patterns of future hearing-aid use or evaluation of individual benefit from hearing-aid features. The ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not related to IOI-HA outcome.
PubMed ID
22731922 View in PubMed
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1652 records – page 1 of 166.