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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Comparison of the adsorptive properties of activated charcoal and Alaskan montmorillonite for some common poisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13597
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1967 Jan;10(1):95-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1967

Effects of cold exposure upon the action of therapeutic drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298776
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-20. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
February 1965
index being about 180. With pentobarbital, the margin of safety as indicated by thera- peutic index in mice and rats in the cold was only one-third that at room temperature, while no significant differences were noted in the ED50 (median hypnotic dose) of the drug in all species of animals tested at
  1 document  
Author
Chen, James Y.P.
Bergman, H.C.
Author Affiliation
North American Aviation, Inc., Space and Information Systems Division, Downey, Calif.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-20. 26 p.
Date
February 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1872942
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Rats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Morphine
Pentobarbital
toxicity
Abstract
Based on determinations of LD50, ED50 and therapeutic index, both in mice and rats, morphine sulfate was found to be at least six times as toxic and three times as effective in the cold (4°C) as: at room temperature (22 to 24°C). In the rat, however, morphine showed a very wide margin of safety in the cold as well as at room temperature, the therapeutic index being about 180. With pentobarbital, the margin of safety as indicated by therapeutic index in mice and rats in the cold was only one-third that at room temperature, while no significant differences were noted in the ED50 (median hypnotic dose) of the drug in all species of animals tested at 4°C and at 22°C. No significant differences were found in the plasma concentrations of the test drugs at different temperatures to account for the markedly increased toxicity of morphine and pentobarbital in all animals studied, as well as the apparent increased efficacy of morphine in mice and rats acutely exposed to cold. Greater-percentage pressor response to norepinephrine was demonstrated in dogs with or without hemorrhagic hypotension at 4°C than those at 22°C. The analgesic-potentiating effect of chlorpromazine was found to be greater in rats in the cold than those at room temperature when subeffective doses of morphine were administered simultaneously with a given dose of chlorpromazine. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed and recommendations are offered.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-20
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[Letter: Mebumal (Nembutal) injections and drug abuse]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13275
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1975 Mar 10;137(11):639-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1975
Author
K. Jensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1975 Mar 10;137(11):639-40
Date
Mar-10-1975
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Pentobarbital - administration & dosage - poisoning
Substance-Related Disorders - mortality
PubMed ID
1145781 View in PubMed
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Oral pentobarbital intoxication in a bitch.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237519
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1986 Jan 15;188(2):191-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1986
Author
V. Fucci
W E Monroe
D H Riedesel
L L Jackson
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1986 Jan 15;188(2):191-2
Date
Jan-15-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Administration, Oral
Animals
Dog Diseases - chemically induced
Dogs
Euthanasia
Female
Humans
Pentobarbital - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Abstract
Pentobarbital intoxication in a 5-year-old female Samoyed was confirmed by the finding of a high concentration of the drug in serum. The dog apparently had consumed one of her pups, which had been euthanatized the day before with a 26% sodium pentobarbital solution. She was admitted in a condition consistent with light general anesthesia. The dog recovered after gastric lavage supportive therapy, and the administration of an alkalinizing solution to hasten drug excretion. This case demonstrates the hazards associated with indiscriminate disposal of carcasses containing large amounts of euthanasia solution.
PubMed ID
3700218 View in PubMed
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Research on the influence of variations in environmental temperatures on the systemic effects of alcohol alone and in combination with other drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298798
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-2. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1965
blood pentobarbital concentration was increased in animals exposed to cold for long periods, cold alone had no effect on the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital, and affected the increased sleeping time resulting from the simultaneous administration of alcohol and pentobarbital only when the two
  1 document  
Author
Dewey, M.L.
Leung, S.E.C.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-2. 34 p.
Date
October 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1700021
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Ethyl alcohol
Hypothermia
Acclimatization
Chlorpromazine
Pentobarbital
Blood
Brain
Stomach
Intestine
Abstract
This report summarizes experimental results obtained in the elevation of the effect of alcohol alone and in combination with other drugs as influenced by decreased environmental temperatures. The acute toxicity of ethyl alcohol was doubled by 24 hours exposure to 0-5° C, immediately prior to administration of the test. Cold exposure of 2, 24 or 168 hours did not materially affect the height of the blood alcohol level, nor was there any difference in the time required to reach maximum blood concentrations in animals given single doses. There were no significant differences in the alcohol blood/brain and brain/breath ratios resulting from short or prolonged exposures to cold. Motor coordination, as measured by ability to maintain equilibrium, deteriorated significantly in animals exposed to cold for 168 hours and administered small doses of alcohol. A further difference in deterioration of performance did not occur at higher doses of alcohol or later than 30 minutes after the dose was administered. While the percent of absorption of alcohol administered orally is greater with small doses than with the large, per unit of time, cold had no significant effect on over-all absorption rate. Rates of alcohol metabolism were not significantly altered by either acute or prolonged cold exposure, though body temperatures were altered significantly. When animals were habituated by receiving an aqueous solution of alcohol as their only source of fluid intake, equilibrium was impaired to a greater extent in some cold-exposed groups, the total increase in body weight per unit of time was depressed, the absorption rate was greater and oxidation rate slower than in groups habituated at room temperature. While the blood pentobarbital concentration was increased in animals exposed to cold for long periods, cold alone had no effect on the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital, and affected the increased sleeping time resulting from the simultaneous administration of alcohol and pentobarbital only when the two drugs were given within a short interval and the dose of alcohol was low. Chlorpromazine had a bivalent effect on body temperature, raising the temperature in animals exposed to cold and lowering the temperature in animals maintained at room temperature or when given to cold exposed animals in combination with alcohol. Cold had a brief effect on the impairment produced by alcohol and chlorpromazine together. Present data do not indicate a prolongation of the time during which performance is impaired due to the combined effects of chlorpromazine, ethyl alcohol, and cold.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.65-2
Documents
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Sympathetic beta-agonists and cochlear blood flow in guinea pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11586
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1994 Apr;23(2):97-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
N. Kobayashi
M. Hasegawa
K. Yokoyama
T. Tamura
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Toride Kyodo General Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1994 Apr;23(2):97-101
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Carbon Dioxide - blood
Cochlea - blood supply - drug effects
Dobutamine - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Guinea Pigs
Isoproterenol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Oxygen - blood
Pentobarbital - pharmacology
Regional Blood Flow - drug effects
Abstract
The effects of sympathetic beta-agonists on blood pressure and cochlear blood flow were studied in 15 guinea pigs. Cochlear blood flow was measured by a laser Doppler flowmeter, Periflux PF2 (Perimed, Sweden). Small doses (0.01 and 0.1 microgram/kg) of isoproterenol elevated blood pressure, but larger doses (10 and 50 micrograms/kg) decreased blood pressure. Cochlear blood flow showed a biphasic pattern, in that there was an initial decrease with a subsequent increase. Dobutamine, a beta 1-agonist, elevated blood pressure and increased cochlear blood flow in a dose-dependent manner. Salbutamol, a beta 2-agonist, decreased blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner and induced a biphasic pattern of changes (i.e., an initial decrease with a subsequent increase). The effect of isoproterenol, which is a nonselective beta-agonist, is oriented more to a beta 2-agonist at larger doses. These different effects induced by isoproterenol are probably due to a balance of dominance between beta 1 action and beta 2 action at different doses.
PubMed ID
8028080 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.