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A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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Activities and sources of income after a period of long-term sick leave--a population-based prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120986
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:745
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anders Wikman
Michael Wiberg
Staffan Marklund
Kristina Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-171 77, Sweden. anders.wikman@ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:745
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - trends
Insurance, Disability - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is limited knowledge about what happens to people after long-term sick leave. The aim of this report was to conduct a prospective study of individuals who were on prolonged sick leave during a particular year, considering their activities and sources of income during subsequent years. To enable comparison of different time periods, we used three cohorts of individuals with different starting years.
Using data from national registers, three separate cohorts were constructed that included all people living in Sweden who were 20-64 years of age (>5 million) in the years 1995, 2000 and 2005, respectively. The individual members of the cohorts were classified into the following groups based on their main source of income and activity in 1995-2008: on long-term sick leave, employed, old-age pensioner, long-term unemployed, disability pensioner, on parental leave, social assistance recipient, student allowance recipient, deceased, or emigrated.
Most individuals on long-term (> 6 months) sick leave in 1995 were not employed 13 years later. Only 11% of the women and 13% of the men were primarily in employment after 13 years. Instead, a wide range of alternatives existed, for example, many had been granted disability pension, and about 10% of the women and 17% of the men had died during the follow-up period. A larger proportion of those with long-term sick leave were back in employment when 2005 was the starting year for the follow-up.
The low future employment rates for people on long-term sick leave may seem surprising. There are several possible explanations for the finding: The disorders these people may have, might have entailed longstanding difficulties on the labor market. Besides, long-term absence from work, no matter what its causes were, might have worsen the chances of further employment. The economic cycles may also have been of importance. The improving labor market during later years seems to have improved the chances for employment among those earlier on long-term sick leave.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:10419368715
PubMed ID
22950458 View in PubMed
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Adverse outcomes of chronic widespread pain and common mental disorders in individuals with sickness absence - a prospective study of Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304944
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Aug 27; 20(1):1301
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Aug-27-2020
Author
Mo Wang
Annina Ropponen
Jurgita Narusyte
Björg Helgadóttir
Gunnar Bergström
Victoria Blom
Pia Svedberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. mo.wang@ki.se.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Aug 27; 20(1):1301
Date
Aug-27-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mortality
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Chronic widespread pain (CWP) and common mental disorders (CMDs) are common public health problems, but little is known about the role of CWP and CMDs on future adverse outcomes among work disabled individuals. The aims of the study were to investigate the associations between CWP and CMDs with subsequent disability pension (DP), long-term unemployment (>?90?days) and all-cause mortality in individuals with sickness absence (SA) and whether the associations were explained by familial factors.
In this prospective cohort study, 7884 Swedish twins born between 1933 and 1985 were included and baseline data were gathered from a questionnaire in 1998 to 2006. Register data were used for obtaining information regarding demographics, SA, DP, unemployment and mortality. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to calculate Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) for the associations between CWP and/or CMDs with DP, unemployment and mortality, while conditional Cox models for twin pairs provided control for familial confounding.
Having either CWP or CMDs among those with a history of SA was associated with a higher risk of DP and all-cause mortality than individuals without CWP and CMDs after controlling for socio-demographic and health factors. Moreover, sick-listed individuals with both CWP and CMDs had a higher risk of DP while those who only had CMDs had a higher risk of long-term unemployment compared to those without CWP and CMDs. The association between CMDs with DP and long-term unemployment was no longer significant when controlling for familial factors.
CMDs was a risk factor for DP, unemployment and mortality among individuals with SA, while CWP seems to be important in relation to future DP and mortality. Familial factors played a role in the associations between CMDs and DP and CMDs and unemployment.
PubMed ID
32854684 View in PubMed
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Adverse perinatal conditions and receiving a disability pension early in life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306819
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(2):e0229285
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Fredinah Namatovu
Erling Häggström Lundevaller
Lotta Vikström
Nawi Ng
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(2):e0229285
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities
Disabled Persons
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Longitudinal Studies
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Perinatology
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The number of young adults on disability pension (DP) is increasing in European countries, creating a need to understand the related risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether adverse perinatal conditions are associated with receiving a DP early in life.
This longitudinal cohort study consisted of all persons (N = 453,223) born in Sweden during 1973-1977, observed from 1991 through 2010 when they were aged between 16 and 37 years. Statistics Sweden provided linked national data on the children and their parents. We used logistic regression to assess the association between perinatal health conditions (birth defect, Apgar score, and small for gestational age) and receiving a DP, adjusting for maternal education and the sex of the child.
New recipients of DP were significantly more likely to have had a birth defect (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.74, 95% CI: 2.49-3.00), to have had low Apgar score (AOR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.77-2.52), to have been small for gestational age (AOR 1.73, 95% CI: 1.54-1.94) and to be females (AOR 1.55, 95% CI: 1.46-1.64). Higher maternal education was associated with lower odds of receiving a DP (AOR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.69-0.79) for those with high school education and (AOR 0.67, 95% CI: 0.59-0.75) for those with university education. Age-stratified analysis confirmed increased odds of receiving a DP among those with birth defects and small for gestational age, but this effect reduced with increasing age. Apgar score was significantly associated with starting to receive a DP at ages 16-18 and 19-29, but not at ages 30-33. Women had lower odds of receiving a DP at ages 16-18 (AOR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.64-0.85); however, this reversed from age 19 and upwards (AOR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.41-1.67) and (AOR 2.16, 95% CI: 1.95-2.40) for the age groups of 19-29 and 30-33, respectively. Persons with high maternal education were less likely to receive a DP regardless of age at receiving a DP.
Having a birth defect was the strongest indicator of receiving a DP during early adulthood, followed by small for gestational age and low Apgar score. Overall, the effects of the studied perinatal health conditions were pronounced in those who received a DP at 16-18 years, but this effect weakened with increasing age at receiving a DP. Our findings suggest that policies and programs geared at promoting optimal health at birth might contribute to a reduction in receiving a DP.
PubMed ID
32092090 View in PubMed
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Age, period, and cohort effects for future employment, sickness absence, and disability pension by occupational gender segregation: a population-based study of all employed people in a country (>?3 million).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310549
Source
Can J Public Health. 2019 10; 110(5):584-594
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2019
Author
Lena Gonäs
Anders Wikman
Kristina Alexanderson
Klas Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. lena.gonas@ki.se.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2019 10; 110(5):584-594
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Effect
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Employment - trends
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - trends
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The occupational gender segregation of the labour market is very strong, both in Sweden and in North America. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge on how this is associated with employees' future employment or morbidity. The objectives of this study were to explore age, period, and cohort effects on future employment and morbidity in terms of sickness absence (SA) or disability pension (DP) among women and men employed in numerically gender-segregated or gender-integrated occupations.
Based on Swedish nationwide register data, three population-based cohorts of all people living in Sweden, with a registered occupation, and aged 20-56 years at inclusion in 1985 (N?=?3,183,549), 1990 (N?=?3,372,152), or 2003 (N?=?3,565,579), respectively, were followed prospectively for 8 years each. First, descriptive statistics of employment and SA/DP at follow-up were calculated, related to level of gender segregation/integration of occupation at inclusion. Second, differences between birth cohorts (those born in 1929-1983, respectively) were estimated within each of the periods 1985-1993, 1990-1998, and 2003-2011, using mean polish analyses.
Women and men in gender-segregated occupations differed in relation to future employment rates and SA/DP. However, these differences decreased over time. Furthermore, the results show a birth cohort effect; those born in 1943-1956 remained in employment to a higher extent and also had lower rates of SA/DP than all other birth cohorts.
Differences between people in the five categories of gender-segregated occupations decreased over time. Although age and period are important when explaining the outcome, also birth cohort effects have to be considered, both from a public and an occupational health perspective.
PubMed ID
31089982 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of unemployment, sickness absence and disability pension in Denmark: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292121
Source
Addiction. 2017 Oct; 112(10):1754-1764
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Maja Baeksgaard Jørgensen
Lau Caspar Thygesen
Ulrik Becker
Janne S Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Addiction. 2017 Oct; 112(10):1754-1764
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated the association between weekly alcohol consumption and binge drinking and the risk of unemployment, sickness absence and disability pension.
Prospective register-based cohort study.
Denmark.
A sample of 17?690 men and women, aged 18-60 years from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey in 2000, 2005 and 2010 participated in the study. Participants worked the entire year prior to baseline.
Administrative registers were used to obtain information on unemployment, sickness absence and disability pension during a 5-year follow-up period. Data were analysed by multivariate Cox regression model with random effect (frailty) adjusted for cohabitation status, educational level, Charlson comorbidity index, smoking habits, calendar year and geographic region.
Among males, adjusted hazards ratios (HR) of unemployment were 1.24 (95% CI 1.05-1.46, P = 0.01), 1.28 (95% CI 1.04-1.59, P =0.02) and 1.48 (95% CI 1.21-1.81, P = 0.00) respectively, for abstainers and those with alcohol consumption of 21-27 and = 28 drinks per week when compared with individuals who had 1-13 drinks per week. Corresponding HRs for sickness absence were 1.16 (95% CI 1.02-1.33, P = 0.03), 1.02 (95% CI 0.85-1.23, P = 0.84), and 1.23 (95 % CI 1.04-1.46, P = 0.02). Male abstainers had increased HR for subsequently receiving disability pension. Female abstainers had increased HR of unemployment, sickness absence and disability pension compared to women with moderate alcohol consumption. Binge drinking was associated with higher HR of unemployment compared to non-binge drinking in women: HR of 1.21 (95 % CI 1.03-1.41, P = 0.02).
In Danish men aged 18-60, alcohol abstinence and heavy consumption is associated with increased subsequent risk of unemployment and sickness absence compared with low consumption. In Danish women abstainers have increased risk of unemployment, sickness absence and disability pension, while binge drinkers are more likely to become unemployed subsequently.
PubMed ID
28544338 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, problem drinking, abstention and disability pension award. The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study (HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133418
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jan;107(1):98-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Arnstein Mykletun
Sverre Nesvåg
Simon Øverland
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jan;107(1):98-108
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine associations of abstention, alcohol consumption and problem drinking with subsequent disability pensioning (DP), and whether previous excessive consumption ('sick-quitting') could explain some of the increased risk for DP among abstainers.
Prospective population-based study.
Data were from two waves of the Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT) linked with the national insurance database. The two main analyses included 37,729 (alcohol consumption) and 34,666 (problem drinking) participants.
Alcohol consumption was measured by self-reported consumption, while problem drinking was assessed by the Cut down, Annoyed, Guilt, Eye-opener (CAGE) questionnaire. Information on subsequent DP, including diagnosis for which the DP was awarded, was gathered from the national insurance database. Covariates included somatic illness and symptoms, mental health, health-related behaviour, socio-economic status and social activity.
Those reporting the highest level of alcohol consumption were not at increased risk for DP [hazard ratio (HR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92-1.38], whereas problem drinking was a strong predictor (HR 2.79, 95% CI: 2.08-3.75) compared to their corresponding reference groups. Alcohol abstainers were also at increased risk for DP, but among them, the previous consumers (HR 1.95, 95% CI: 1.48-2.57) and previous excessive consumers (HR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.01-2.74) were at higher risk for DP than constant abstainers.
Problem drinking is linked to subsequent requirement for a disability pension but mere alcohol consumption is not. This is partly explained by 'sick-quitting'.
PubMed ID
21707810 View in PubMed
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Annual costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Finland during 1996-2006 and a prediction model for 2007-2030.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267382
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2015;25:15015
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Fredrik Herse
Toni Kiljander
Lauri Lehtimäki
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2015;25:15015
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost of Illness
Efficiency, Organizational - economics
Finland
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay
Models, Statistical
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - economics
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major burden for the health care system, but the exact costs are difficult to estimate and there are insufficient data available on past and future time trends of COPD-related costs.
The aim of the study was to calculate COPD-related costs in Finland during the years 1996-2006 and estimate future costs for the years 2007-2030.
COPD-related direct and indirect costs in the public health care sector of the whole of Finland during the years 1996-2006 were retrieved from national registers. In addition, we made a mathematical prediction model on COPD costs for the years 2007-2030 on the basis of population projection and changes in smoking habits.
The total annual COPD-related costs amounted to about 100-110 million Euros in 1996-2006, with no obvious change, but there was a slight decrease in direct costs and an increase in indirect costs during these years. The estimation model predicted a 60% increase up to 166 million Euros in COPD-related annual costs by the year 2030. This is caused almost entirely by an increase in direct health care costs that reflect the predicted ageing of the Finnish population, as older age is a significant factor that increases the need for hospitalisation.
The total annual COPD-related costs in Finland have been stable during the years 1996-2006, but if management strategies are not changed a significant increase in direct costs is expected by the year 2030 due to ageing of the population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25811648 View in PubMed
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Are self-report of disability pension and long-term sickness absence accurate? Comparisons of self-reported interview data with national register data in a Swedish twin cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138617
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:763
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Pia Svedberg
Annina Ropponen
Paul Lichtenstein
Kristina Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. pia.svedberg@ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:763
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Insurance, Disability
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Universal Coverage
Abstract
Self-reported disability pension (DP) and sickness absence are commonly used in epidemiological and other studies as a measure of exposure or even as an outcome. The aims were (1) to compare such self-reports with national register information in order to evaluate the validity of self-reported DP and sickness absence, and (2) to estimate the concordance of reporting behaviour in different twin zygosity groups, also by sex.
All Swedish twins born 1933-1958 who participated in the Screening Across the Lifespan Twin study (SALT) 1998-2003, were included (31,122 individuals). The self-reported DP and long-term sickness absence (LTSA) at the time of interview was compared to the corresponding register information retrieved from the National Social Insurance Agency by calculating the proportions of agreements, kappa, sensitivity, specificity, concordance rates, and chi-square test, to evaluate construct validity.
The proportions of overall agreement were 96% and specificity 99% for both DP and LTSA, while the sensitivity was 70% for DP and 45% for LTSA. Kappa estimates were 0.76 for DP, and 0.58 for LTSA. The proportions of positive agreement were 64% for DP and 42% for LTSA. No difference in response style was found between zygosity groups among complete twin pairs for DP and LTSA. Results were similar for women and men and across age. Kappa estimates for DP differed somewhat depending on years of education, 0.68 (college/university) vs. 0.77 (less than 13 years in school) but not for LTSA.
Self-reported DP data may be very useful in studies when register information is not available, however, register data is preferred especially for LTSA. The same degree of twin similarity was found for truthful self-report of DP and LTSA in both monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. Thus, the response style was not influenced by genetic factors. One consequence of this would be that when estimating the relative importance of genetic and environmental effects from twin models, heritability estimates would not be biased.
Notes
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