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A 3-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for back and neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61395
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jensen IB
Bergström G
Ljungquist T
Bodin L
Author Affiliation
Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Box 127 18, 112 94 Stockholm, Sweden. irene.jensen@cns.ki.se
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Cognitive Therapy
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Pensions
Physical Therapy (Specialty) - economics - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Rehabilitation - economics - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of a behavioural medicine rehabilitation programme and the outcome of its two main components, compared to a 'treatment-as-usual' control group. The study employed a 4 x 5 repeated-measures design with four groups and five assessment periods during a 3-year follow-up. The group studied consisted of blue-collar and service/care workers on sick leave, identified in a nationwide health insurance scheme in Sweden. After inclusion, the subjects were randomised to one of the four conditions: behaviour-oriented physiotherapy (PT), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), behavioural medicine rehabilitation consisting of PT+CBT (BM) and a 'treatment-as-usual' control group (CG). Outcome variables were sick leave, early retirement and health-related quality of life. A cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing the programmes, was made. The results showed, consistently, the full-time behavioural medicine programme being superior to the three other conditions. The strongest effect was found on females. Regarding sick leave, the mean difference in the per-protocol analysis between the BM programme and the control group was 201 days, thus reducing sick leave by about two-thirds of a working year. Rehabilitating women has a substantial impact on costs for production losses, whereas rehabilitating men seem to be effortless with no significant effect on either health or costs. In conclusion, a full-time behavioural medicine programme is a cost-effective method for improving health and increasing return to work in women working in blue-collar or service/care occupations and suffering from back/neck pain.
PubMed ID
15911154 View in PubMed
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A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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A 7-year follow-up of multidisciplinary rehabilitation among chronic neck and back pain patients. Is sick leave outcome dependent on psychologically derived patient groups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149098
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Gunnar Bergström
Cecilia Bergström
Jan Hagberg
Lennart Bodin
Irene Jensen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-33
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Back Pain - classification - psychology - rehabilitation
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - classification - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Patient care team
Pensions
Prognosis
Risk
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A valid method for classifying chronic pain patients into more homogenous groups could be useful for treatment planning, that is, which treatment is effective for which patient, and as a marker when evaluating treatment outcome. One instrument that has been used to derive subgroups of patients is the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a classification method based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, to predict sick leave among chronic neck and back pain patients for a period of 7 years after vocational rehabilitation. As hypothesized, dysfunctional patients (DYS), according to the MPI-S, showed a higher amount of sickness absence and disability pension expressed in days than adaptive copers (AC) during the 7-years follow-up period, even when adjusting for sickness absence prior to rehabilitation (355.8days, 95% confidence interval, 71.7; 639.9). Forty percent of DYS patients and 26.7% of AC patients received disability pension during the follow-up period. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Further analyses showed that the difference between patient groups was most pronounced among patients with more than 60days of sickness absence prior to rehabilitation. Cost-effectiveness calculations indicated that the DYS patients showed an increase in production loss compared to AC patients. The present study yields support for the prognostic value of this subgroup classification method concerning long-term outcome on sick leave following this type of vocational rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19683950 View in PubMed
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A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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[8000 members want a lower retirement age back. Interview by Kaj Nyman].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209294
Source
Vardfacket. 1997 Feb 10;21(2):22-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1997
Author
M. Wenngren
K. Nauclér
Source
Vardfacket. 1997 Feb 10;21(2):22-3
Date
Feb-10-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Health Personnel - economics
Humans
Middle Aged
Pensions
Retirement - economics
Sweden
PubMed ID
9447175 View in PubMed
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Abstinence and current or former alcohol use as predictors of disability retirement in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265157
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Leena Kaila-Kangas
Teija Kivekäs
Jaana Laitinen
Aki Koskinen
Tommi Härkänen
Leena Hirvonen
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):373-80
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pensions
Prospective Studies
Records as Topic
Retirement
Risk factors
Abstract
According to previous studies, abstinence from alcohol increases the risk of disability retirement (DR). We studied whether former alcohol users' poor mental or physical health might have contributed to this result.
Prospective population-based study of 3621 occupationally active Finns aged 30-55 years at baseline. Disability pension data for 2000-2011 was retrieved from national pension records. We examined medically certified disability retirement due to all causes and due to mental disorders among lifelong abstainers, former drinkers, those with an alcohol use disorder irrespective of consumption and current users, further classified according to weekly intake of alcohol. Chronic somatic diseases were evaluated in a clinical examination and common mental and alcohol use disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Cox regression was used.
Neither lifelong abstinence nor alcohol consumption, even at hazardous levels, without alcohol use disorder was associated with disability retirement. Compared with light drinkers, former drinkers' hazard ratio for DR due to mental disorders was 2.67 (95% CI 1.39-5.13), allowing for somatic and mental morbidity, physical and psychosocial workload, health behaviour and socio-demographic factors. The respective hazard ratio of DR due to all causes for those with alcohol use disorder was 2.17 (1.49-3.16) and of DR due to mental disorders 4.04 (2.02 to 8.06).
Lifelong abstinence did not predict disability retirement. Former drinkers and people with alcohol use disorders were at a multi-fold risk of work disability due to mental disorders compared with light drinkers, thus it is important to support their work ability.
PubMed ID
25743875 View in PubMed
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Abusers of alcohol immediately prior to pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12864
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):44-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
M. Elton
J O Hörnquist
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):44-54
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Brain Damage, Chronic - chemically induced
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
In the granting of a disability pension to an alcohol abuser society is taking a somewhat controversial step. In order to elucidate the overall situation of these abusers, the quality of life of 61 abusing applicants was examined. The sample represents all 78 first-time applicants during an 18-month period in a geographically defined region in the county of Ostergötland in Sweden. As expected, apart from their extensive abuse, the applicants were in bad psychiatric-psychological condition and demonstrated severe neuro-psychological and biochemical disturbances. In addition, their social network was somewhat restricted and also otherwise rather problematic. These deviations were evident in relation to a matched group of newly pensioned non-abusers. In comparison with another more closely matched group of abusers undergoing rehabilitation, the differences appeared mainly within the psychiatric-psychological sphere. This is a report in a series from the research project "Abuse of alcohol - Disability pension - Quality of life".
PubMed ID
6613619 View in PubMed
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[Access to own health information and services on the Internet by disability pensioners and other citizens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91436
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Halldórsdóttir Gyda
Thoroddsen Asta St
Author Affiliation
Heilsuneti ehf. gyda@heilsunet.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Date
Nov-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Health Information
Disabled Persons - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Iceland
Insurance, Disability
Internet
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pensions
Perception
Questionnaires
Social Security
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study Icelandic citizens' perception, attitude and preferences regarding access to own health information and interactive services at the State Social Security Institute of Iceland (SSSI). Hypotheses regarding differences between disability pensioners and other citizens were put forward. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive mail survey was performed with a random sample from the Icelandic population, 1400 individuals, age 16 to 67, divided into two groups of 700 each: (1) persons entitled to disability pension (2) other citizens in Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 56 questions, descriptive statistics were used and Chi square for comparison with 95% as confidence level of significance. Response rate was 34.9%. RESULTS: Perception of rights to access own's health information was significantly higher by pensioners than other citizens. Attitude concerning impact of access was in general positive, with pensioners significantly more positive about effectiveness, perception of health, communication and decisions owing to services, access at SSSI, maintaining health records and controlling access. CONCLUSIONS: The study, the first of its kind in Iceland, supports previous research. The results, as well as foreign models of research projects, are recommended to be used for evolution of electronic health services and researching employees' viewpoints. Future research in Iceland should address the impact of interactive health communication on quality of life, health and services' efficiency.
PubMed ID
18974434 View in PubMed
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The actions of the social insurance agency regarding long-term sickness absentees before and after a medical assessment--a study of 384 case files.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271604
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(18):1683-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Staffan Marklund
Göran Lundh
Klas Gustafsson
Jürgen Linder
Pia Svedberg
Kristina Alexanderson
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(18):1683-91
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Retrospective Studies
Return to work
Sick Leave
Social Work
Sweden
Work Capacity Evaluation
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to investigate actions taken by the Social Insurance Agency (SIA) for long-term sickness absentees and possible associations of this with future sick leave or disability pension.
For 384 long-term sickness absentees who had had a multidisciplinary medical assessment (MMA) during 2001-2006, three types of data were obtained: (1) case file information about SIA actions, (2) suggested rehabilitation measures from the MMA and (3) sickness absence and disability pension data.
Most individuals had been subject to a range of actions by the SIA. Sixty percent had been invited to a coordination meeting, and half of those who assessed by the MMA for vocational rehabilitation were approved to get it by the SIA. Few SIA actions were associated with full or partial return to work.
Although the studied individuals had been on sick leave for a long time, the number of SIA actions related to vocational rehabilitation was limited and came late in the sick-leave spell. The information from the MMA was often not used as a basis for further SIA action and seldom resulted in return to work. The positive MMA views on the potential of vocational rehabilitation were not met by SIA actions.
Suggestions on vocational rehabilitation from a medical assessment was in many cases not used by the social insurance agency in relationship to long-term sickness absentees. Active rehabilitation measures by the social insurance agency were few and came late in the sickness absence process. Few of the activities taken by the social insurance agency enhanced return to work.
PubMed ID
25354147 View in PubMed
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Activities and sources of income after a period of long-term sick leave--a population-based prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120986
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:745
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anders Wikman
Michael Wiberg
Staffan Marklund
Kristina Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-171 77, Sweden. anders.wikman@ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:745
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - trends
Insurance, Disability - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is limited knowledge about what happens to people after long-term sick leave. The aim of this report was to conduct a prospective study of individuals who were on prolonged sick leave during a particular year, considering their activities and sources of income during subsequent years. To enable comparison of different time periods, we used three cohorts of individuals with different starting years.
Using data from national registers, three separate cohorts were constructed that included all people living in Sweden who were 20-64 years of age (>5 million) in the years 1995, 2000 and 2005, respectively. The individual members of the cohorts were classified into the following groups based on their main source of income and activity in 1995-2008: on long-term sick leave, employed, old-age pensioner, long-term unemployed, disability pensioner, on parental leave, social assistance recipient, student allowance recipient, deceased, or emigrated.
Most individuals on long-term (> 6 months) sick leave in 1995 were not employed 13 years later. Only 11% of the women and 13% of the men were primarily in employment after 13 years. Instead, a wide range of alternatives existed, for example, many had been granted disability pension, and about 10% of the women and 17% of the men had died during the follow-up period. A larger proportion of those with long-term sick leave were back in employment when 2005 was the starting year for the follow-up.
The low future employment rates for people on long-term sick leave may seem surprising. There are several possible explanations for the finding: The disorders these people may have, might have entailed longstanding difficulties on the labor market. Besides, long-term absence from work, no matter what its causes were, might have worsen the chances of further employment. The economic cycles may also have been of importance. The improving labor market during later years seems to have improved the chances for employment among those earlier on long-term sick leave.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22950458 View in PubMed
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575 records – page 1 of 58.